What's the best way to repair pitted, burned manifold interface where the Gland RIngs seal?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What's the best way to repair pitted, burned manifold interface where the Gland RIngs seal?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 12:07 pm:

I have an early block that has the manifold interfaces where the gland rings seal that are burned away somewhat. I am considering putting the block on a mill and cutting away the burned area and pressing in a new ring of metal.... much like inserting new valve seats.

Anyone done anything similar? Anyone got a better idea? I'm open.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Will Copeland - Melbourne Florida on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 12:14 pm:

Im a fan of JB Weld. Fixed the head on an old Jap mobile years ago. Last for years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 12:20 pm:

Yes, I'm a fan of that stuff too, but the sealing surfaces could possibly compress, warping the manifold. So I was looking for a solution that gave me a metal-to-metal repair. I wasn't a fan of welding the block up because that's a lot of area to cover and there are risks of cracking. Although the recent thread of an early open valve block that was pieced back together should put that fear to rest, huh?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 12:31 pm:

Use chevy valve seats,and the mill to clean up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 12:44 pm:


My 1915 had quite a bit of pitting. I used Permatex Ultra Copper sealant under the crush gaskets. It's labeled as high-temp, but doesn't say how high.


I think I probably have a couple hundred miles on it now, and so far so good. No leaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 01:07 pm:

Steve,
Thanks for the photo's and input. Your block is quite a bit worse than mine overall, but the rear port at the back of the engine is really bad and rusted away. That may cause the exhaust manifold to bend to fit the contour of the block. But I sure like the job you did... and the buffalo nickel is great!

Jack, I was thinking the same thing..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 01:09 pm:

James,

Yes, people have done what you propose. Keep your cut shallow enough so as not to break into the water jacket. Maybe just taking a cut across the whole face could clean it up too? If you do that however, keep in mind that you're making the gland ring counterbores more shallow and may have to shorten the gland rings accordingly. You'll also move the exhaust manifold closer to the head. Sometimes there's only minimal clearance there anyway so be sure you don't get interference.

Steve's idea of high temp sealant could work, provided the condition is not too bad. Personally, I would not use JB Weld here.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 04:22 pm:

Here is what we did to a block which was severely corroded.



These inserts were held in place by the copper manifold rings
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 07:56 pm:

I would suggest having the surface faced and trued. The worse thing that could happen is that you might need to make the gland rings a little thinner but unless the car is sitting out side or creek bottom, should be good for many, many years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 11:29 pm:

The best way to deal with this is to set it up on a milling machine and machine the surface. I have not yet found one that I would have had to counterbore the port and put in an insert. That is a risky proposition. Sometimes I have to bore the core plug seats deeper. No problem as I already have the block set up on the mill and I have the proper end mill to do it. It takes about ten minutes more. I can post a picture but it will be upside down. Still working on that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Thursday, August 06, 2015 - 08:30 am:

Norman from a curiosity standpoint did you also machine the block for the freeze plugs? If so did you use a pipe thread tap? What size? Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, August 06, 2015 - 09:00 am:

Erik sent me his pictures to post. Here they are right side up.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, August 06, 2015 - 04:45 pm:

I only helped assemble the car. The engine was in that condition when it was sent to the machine shop where all the machine work was done. The day I was there, the work was already done. Those freeze plugs were in place. The engine was placed in a 26 Roadster, but I am not sure it was a 26 block. The body was also disassembled and painted before I got there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ted Dumas on Thursday, August 06, 2015 - 06:04 pm:

On the later blocks the metal there is pretty slim. I am not sure how much metal is in an early block.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Thursday, August 06, 2015 - 07:09 pm:

From the valve case it appears to be a late engine and that's what threw me the screw in welch plugs stopped being made in 13 I think.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Friday, August 07, 2015 - 03:55 am:

The engine I am looking to repair is pretty thin in that area. I am still going to have to counter bore the rear most port.


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