Google eBook

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Google eBook
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve H. on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 06:04 pm:

I found this ebook: "The Model T Ford Car, Truck and Conversion Sets: Also Genuine Ford Farm Tractor, Construction, Operation and Repair." at https://goo.gl/fjOAmR and thought others might want to download their own free copy.

I'm new to the forum and have been enjoying the posts. Thanks to all the contributors for their information sharing!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve H. on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 06:11 pm:

This version t looks to be the same without the Ford Tractor information: https://goo.gl/SY9pZh


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 08:08 pm:

Over on archive.org you can find (and download) countless books on automobiles, motorcycles, Ford, telephone, radio, early electronics before the word was probably coined ... and books, magazines and movies on just about any subject you can think of. Nothing on picking winning lottery numbers though :-(

Regards,
Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 09:08 pm:

Steve,

From your profile this looks like your first 2 postings. Welcome to the forum. Thank you for sharing your find on the books. Some of the more recent booklets published by the Model T Ford Club of America are often a little better for restoring certain parts such as the rear axle, etc. But the early books also contain a lot of good information. And if only we could still purchase new parts at those prices.

Please let us know if you are new to Model Ts or if you are an old head with Model Ts but just new to the forum. It helps folks know how respond better to your postings. For example if you have been driving and working on Ts for years, we don't need to warn you about many of the known safety issues the Model T has. But if you are new to Ts they can save you a lot of expense and possibly pain if you read about them rather than discover them first hand. If you are new to Ts, recommend check out the saftey information on the thread at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/541535.html

See: http://www.mtfca.com/clubpages/chapters.htm and http://www.modelt.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=5&Itemid=15 to find one of the nearest chapters. They can be a real source of encouragement and help you as you learn to maintain the car.

Steve Jelf has an excellent set of books he recommends for new owners on his web site at: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/ with the T section at: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG52.html and the recommended books listed at: http://dauntlessgeezer.com/DG80.html

Note there are also other free “how to books” on the internet see: Ford Service at: http://mtfci2002.readyhosting.com/manuals/Model_T_Service_Manual/mtsm.html and does include the starter equipped cars and even the 1926 -27 “Improved car” features.

The owners/instruction manuals are at: http://www.mtfca.com/books/bookmenu.htm and the 1921 would work great for your 1922 car. Also the Ford Instruction Course on that same page the link is: http://www.mtfca.com/books/Course.htm

And to help you with parts identification etc. I like Lang’s Old Car Parts on line catalog (you can also down load it as a PDF) available from: https://www.modeltford.com/download.aspx 16 mb so on a slow connection start the down load when you are going to do something else. Many of the photos are in color. Many but not all of the part numbers are the same as those used by Ford. They also have some helpful tips in the catalog. They are also great folks to deal with.

Have lots of fun with your Ford and welcome to the forum. And if you are new to Model Ts also -- welcome to the hobby.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve H. on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 09:31 pm:

This version t looks to be the same without the Ford Tractor information: https://goo.gl/SY9pZh


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve H. on Wednesday, August 05, 2015 - 09:41 pm:

I'm not sure how that got posted a second time. It wasn't what I typed but anyway... Thanks for the info Garnet and Hap Tucker. I will definitely check out your links.

This was my first post and I'm new to the forum. I'm not exactly new to Model T's but do have a lot to learn. The Model T in my profile picture was sold new by my grandfather and later taken back in trade. It was then passed down through my uncles to my dad. So, most of its life it has been in the family but for the last 30 years it has been in storage. As a kid I helped Dad maintain it and was allowed to drive it, but it has been a long while.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, August 06, 2015 - 09:08 am:

Neat car, welcome to the forum! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve H. on Thursday, August 06, 2015 - 12:41 pm:

Thanks Mark Strange


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Thursday, August 06, 2015 - 07:41 pm:

Steve,

Depending on what condition the car was in when your Dad put it in storage -- it could be as easy as adding gas, coolant, changing the oil etc. and it might be ready to go. For items to check see the article “How to remove a T from mothballs” by Milt Webb is at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/8538.html -- scroll down to Tom Mullin’s posting the third posting from the top. That is probably more than you need to do – but includes a lot of good things to check.

Or if your touring was like Blackie, my 1915 (see profile picture) -- the reason my Dad put it up on blocks is it needed (and still needs) just about everything. Our 1918 was in a lot better shape so we moved the good tires from the 1915 to the 1918 so we could drive more and work less on the T.

That is great that you know the history of the car back to when it was originally sold. Very few of us are that fortunate. Looking at the photo in your profile I think your touring probably is a 1923 - 1925 model year car "IF" the top bows and windshield are original to the car. And if the front fenders are original and do not have a folded over lip -- i.e. they look like the ones below, then it would be a 1923 model year T. (Thank you Martin Vowell for posting the photo!)



Or if the fenders are original and have the lip like the ones shown below, it would be a 1924-25 model year car.



Of course many Ts had many items change out over the years. I point out that if you date Blackie by the front fenders it is a 1924 or later. And if you date it by the rear axle it is a 1915. But in general Blackie appears to have started life as a 1915 with upgrades along the way. It really isn't that important until you go to order parts like a top etc. when the one man top is different from the two man top etc. Bruce's (RIP) book "Model T Ford" covers a lot of those details and is available as a soft copy book from the club at: http://modeltstore.myshopify.com/collections/frontpage/products/model-t-ford-the-car-that-changed-the-world or you can order the two CD set that includes a lot more from:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/333725.html?1357665853 (the shipping went up to $6.25 back in Mar 2015).

See also the posting on 1917-1923 cowl width verses 1924-1925 cowl width at: http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/202420.html

Again welcome to the forum -- and have fun with the T!

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off

(Message edited by Hap_tucker on August 06, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve H. on Monday, August 17, 2015 - 09:53 am:

Thanks for all the great information Hap Tucker. I'm pretty sure Dad said it was a 1921 but Mom thinks it is a 1923. My uncles didn't worry about what & how they changed it. I remember him saying the wheels were not correct (my uncles wanted bigger ones), that the tire rack on the back didn't belong on it and the hood was wrong. I believe he got the top from a friend in the 70's. I can't remember if that included the bows or just the fabric. I have more pictures of Lizzie and the front lip/fenders/radiator at https://goo.gl/photos/1roVw1B3EpJ6zDEy8 If you have a moment and can take a look, that would be great. Maybe it isn't a 1921 after all. Thanks.The Front End


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - 09:08 pm:

Steve,

It is getting late, but "IF" the body and slanted front windshield are original to the car, it is a 1923 model year car. It could have been sold between September 1922 to July 1923
ref: http://www.mtfca.com/encyclo/1923.htm





(side note: That straight cut style top was used on the early 1923 tourings. But you said the top had been replaced so that probably is not the original top.)

Note it has the slanted windshield and one man top bows that were introduced together with the 1923 model year cars. I'm 99% sure it has the 1921-1923 style body since it does not have the steering column bracket on the dash and appears to have the narrow firewall size of the 1917-1923 cars. It also has the 3 piece rear seat tub. And it does NOT have a bracket for a two man top to attach to on either side of the front seat.

The 1921-22 cars had a straight up and down windshield NOT a slanted one. The 1921-23 cars (also many earlier cars) had the top brackets on the sides of the front seat.

To make it 100% sure that I have the correct width of the firewall/dash please take a look at the photos below and confirm which one your firewall is closer to in size. I'm 99.9% sure it is a 1917-1923 width firewall -- but you can measure it and know for certain. Ford did not supply a wooden 1924-25 firewall but someone could have made one.





If you shared the engine serial number that is located over the water inlet on the driver's side of the engine, I missed it. Please share it again. That could provide a good clue for better dating the car.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


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