What kind of wax for original Ford paint?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What kind of wax for original Ford paint?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 02:11 am:

I have a 1934 ford sedan and a 1939 Ford sedan both cars have real nice original paint. I'm looking for a wax that has no abrasives in it. The paint on the 34 is getting thin in spots and I want to preserve it as long as possible. Meguires 26 yellow wax does a nice job, but still takes some paint off. Any ideas? Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 02:21 am:

Talk to the guys here in Huntington Beach at Mothers. I am sure they can recommend the right wax. They have supported our hobby at many events.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 07:12 am:

Mothers (and others) sell a pure Carnauba wax. That is pure wax with nothing else.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 07:48 am:

I have an original paint 1937 Ford and have used Meguires products without a problem. We have a local Meguires dealer that has put on a couple of seminars for our Early Ford V-8 chapter. They were quite informative. I was concerned about rubbing the paint off with an abrasive on the '37. I don't wax it. I just use No. 7.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 07:54 am:

Kim, I use Auto Tech SLICK SHINE on my T. It does
not have any Silicone in it and is not abrasive.
I put it on a couple of times a year. I also use another Auto Tech product called WOW to maintain the paint. It is a very good spray detailer that does not turn white.
My 11 T has never had any wax on the paint. The paint is 20 years old.
I am a dealer for Auto Tech Products.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 07:55 am:

Wax for an old Ford??

I use Marvel Mystery Oil, but I am just trying to keep the rust from progressing.
A friend says that the military did a study that shows WD-40 is better than the expensive stuff at protecting metal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 08:16 am:

Maybe the binder that holds the pigments is degrading from exposure to light, so some pigments are lost by just touching the paint while applying the wax?

I think Ford offered metallic paints in the late 30's - a local collector used to have a 1938 convertible with original paint in green metallic. Don't know what kind of wax he used, though, just wondering if any of yours, Kim or Verne are metallic?
Pictures would be nice regardless of paint type :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 09:30 am:

They say not to use wax, but polish. I switched from McGuires Gold Class which I used (and really still do) swear by to Wizards Shine and Protect I think it's called. Plus I use their Mist and Shine in between polishing, which really only needs once a year anyway. Great stuff.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 09:34 am:

Roger, neither of my cars are metallic, and are always stored inside.
Vern, I have used number 7 and I like it but it takes a lot of paint off.
Gene, I have contacted meguires and will try mothers as well.
Royce, I thought that pure carnauba was the answer, but still had the same issue.
Pete, I'll look into auto tech. Thanks for all the comments.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 10:27 am:

For any original paint I use Simoniz. It has to be the old style brown wax in the can though. I bought out a supply from a local parts store that had NOS cans of it. I don't believe that it is made anymore but it will not remove paint. It is a lot of work though. It will bring up the shine of old paint and keep it up much longer than most of what you can buy today. I know that woodworking shops carry products very similar to it if you can't find Simoniz brand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 12:15 pm:

I also occasionally use the old, Simoniz straight wax.

You can still find cans of Simoniz wax from the 1920s-40s orange can to the 1950s-60s can at estate sales and swap meets. Much harder to find is Simoniz Kleener (which my dad prefers above anything else) which is a very fine/mild polishing compound.

If the wax in the can is crumbled into small pieces, it can be melted and smoothed out so it is as good as new. Set the can, with the lid off, in a sauce pan of simmering water on the stove. I've done this with a few cans - works out slick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 01:17 pm:

Kim,

Here at work, we use Trewax on varnished wood. Dark brown, no cutters or abrasives. Pretty sure you can buy that at places like Ganahl Lumber or any non-big box place.

Many years ago, (60's) My brother used a product called Klix Twenty Grand, or something to that effect. It was a light blue color and also was guaranteed void of abrasives. straight carnuba.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 01:20 pm:

Correction, "Blitz" Twenty Grand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R. S. Cruickshank on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 03:27 pm:

I was entered in a concourse show a few weeks ago with my 1913 hack. In the goody bag was a bottle of Groits wax. I tried a little on one of my cars and thought it was pretty good. Anybody else tried it?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kim Dobbins on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 05:57 pm:

I got a reply today from Meguiars. They said there #26, gold class carnuba wax, ultimate wax, nxt tech wax 2.0 and deep crystals carnuba wax are all non abrasive.They also said any rubbing motion with any wax product will produce some paint loss. Thanks to all for there comments.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 08:08 pm:

Roger, my '37 does not have metallic in it. It is Washington Blue. In the photo it is the one on the left. Dad & I had "twins" at one time. Mine had a hot-rod Flathead motor with Edmunds speed equipment and a Columbia (original to the car). After dad passed away, I put the Columbia in the original '37 and sold mine. The '33 in the photo is black with a red metallic. It was a while before I noticed that it had the metallic in it. The car really "pops". I think it is because of the metallic.

I'm not a paint or wax expert. I got started on Meguiars when we had a 1981 Dodge Station Wagon that was maroon and had paint problems (oxidation). It was explained to me by the Meguiars people that the No. 7 was meant to go into the paint and replace the oils that were missing (at least that is how I remember the terminology they used). It is hard stuff to put on and take off so it will look good. I've also used No. 9 which seems to me to be a little lighter weight No. 7 and much easier to put on and take off.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 08:34 pm:

Cream separator oil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 09:47 pm:

That Wizards polish I posted earlier above is actually called "Master Shine"..in a purple bottle. You can get it online or use their website to find a local retailer. Luckily I have one but 7 miles away. Great stuff. Kim, this would probably work very well on your cars. I'd try it. About $15 a bottle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 10:24 pm:

I would certainly think that Meguiars #26 is a great choice for off the shelf wax. I use Duragloss 952 but, it is getting expensive and hard to find. I now have only one mail order source from out of the country at more than $100.00 a bottle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Thursday, August 13, 2015 - 10:34 pm:

The idea of wax is that it coats the existing paint with a coating. This is then the new surface so it is exposed to rain, dirt grime etc and the paint does not get touched.

Paint is a coating with or without pigment that will be attacked by the elements. If left untouched it will breakdown and oxidise. This is always happening but if the paint is offered protection from the harmful weather conditions it will have a longer life.

First up keep it out of the weather by garaging it. keep it washed and clean covered up with a cover and that helps more, wax coat the surface as well cover it, garage it and things get even better.

Fail to do any of the above or expose it to harsh conditions such as strong sunlight or just out in the open in atmosphere with lots of pollution no washing or cleaning or any sort of wax or polish and it deteriorates quicker.

The Carnauba wax coating required a bit of elbow grease to smooth it out and coat the surface. As is usually the case everyone wants things to be easier so the companies make products to make life easier.

Silicon wax is one of the most successful it is easy to apply, repels water great but the coating is thinner and not as good at protecting and requires more applications than Carnauba and it can be a real pain if you want to repaint the surface as it repels the paint into what is termed "fish eyes"

Best senario is to apply wax to new paint after the recommended curing time and after 3 applications the recommended time apart wash the wax off with wax and grease remover and repeat the process over time. Keep waxing over and over leads to the wax blocking out the true color as it is usually has a yellow tinge.

Lots of work, you have to be keen, some owners are, others go to less trouble some do nothing and it depends on the type of paint as some need more attention than others.

Whatever product you use check what it is intended to do, the ones with abrasive in them are designed to clean the neglected paint of its oxides and get back to good paint. Use those long enough and you will remove the color to the primer.

Best bet always is to wash clean and wax, keep the car in a good storage situation covered until needed and the paint life will be massively increased.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Friday, August 14, 2015 - 02:49 am:

The question is right up there with "what oil"....... :-O

I tried this and am very pleased with it.
It's like a lotion and goes on very easily and even better, once dried, comes off easily too.
Steve Jelf would appreciate the price too....... :-)

http://www.walmart.com/ip/Meguiar-s-Cleaner-Wax-Liquid/871743


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Friday, August 14, 2015 - 07:04 am:

Craig, I've used that also in the past, and indeed very pleased. It's great because it removes any previous wax (which of course will yellow over time) as well as mild dirt, But I'm sticking with the Wizards now, doesn't remove the paint, and shines like heck. One polishing a year is all it needs. Then with every "dusting" I spritz a bit of the "Mist and Shine" and use the micro-fiber cloth. They also have a mild scratch remover which also works very well, even on clear-coat. Just my two cents worth.


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