Weight distribution on 1911 Model T

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Weight distribution on 1911 Model T
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By HARRY A DAW Troy, Mo. on Monday, August 17, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

Curious if any one knows the amount of weight on the front wheels compared to the back wheels of a 1911 Model T. Have a new enclosed trailer and am debating on which direction to put the T in the trailer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Monday, August 17, 2015 - 01:02 pm:

My '23 runabout was 1622.5 lbs.
813.5 lbs over the front axle
809.0 lbs over the rear axle.

A touring is likely heavier on the rear axle than the front. I haven't put mine on the scales yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Monday, August 17, 2015 - 01:44 pm:

Getting the weight information you asked about is important, but it's only part of the puzzle. I'd try it both ways and take a careful look at the effect on tongue weight. For some tow vehicles you can find a table that will convert hitch height to pounds of tongue weight. IMHO the thing you want to be really careful of is putting too much weight too far back and end up with too little weight at the tongue.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By HARRY A DAW Troy, Mo. on Monday, August 17, 2015 - 01:47 pm:

Thanks Derek. Mine is a touring.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Monday, August 17, 2015 - 05:03 pm:

Most important factor is tongue weight. Your hitch set up should give you a maximum tongue weight and I usually start with that and then lower it bit by bit by adjusting the location of the car in the trailer until I get the best towing results. Given the differences in trailers, hitch characteristics and the suspension of your tow vehicle there is not set formula. Too light a tongue weight and the trailer will fish tail. Too heavy and it will drag the tow vehicle down. I strive to get things set up so the trailer and tow vehicle are level with the car in the trailer and there is no fish tailing and that usually gives me the best results. I move the car back and forth in the trailer to get the right tongue weight and then mark the floor as I trailer several different vehicles and have a set mark for each of them. That said, I have not found there to be an appreciable difference in positioning between my Model T touring cars and the runabouts. I also recommend torsion bars and anti sway bars for the most comfortable trailering


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul O'Neil, Fullerton, CA, USA on Tuesday, August 18, 2015 - 05:44 pm:

"My '23 runabout was 1622.5 lbs.
813.5 lbs over the front axle
809.0 lbs over the rear axle. "

Gee, that's a lot higher than I thought. Somehow I had been thinking these would weigh 1300 - 1400 lbs wet.

Vintage Paul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 10:13 am:

It is fairly easy to figure out the weight of a car and the weight distribution using nothing more than a few pieces of paper, a tire gauge and a ruler.

Take pieces of paper and chock the wheel fore and aft until the paper just touches the wheel. Measure the distance between the paper and lets call it A.

Now set the paper parallel to the tread both inboard and outboard and do the same thing. Well call this B.

A times B equals the footprint in square inches.

Now measure the air pressure and call that C.
Since every action needs and equal and opposite reaction to remain still

Then, the footprint times the pressure (A x B x C) equals the weight on that tire fairly close. (The error would be slightly high as it omitted the tread pattern space).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Solak, Chicago, IL area on Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 11:29 am:

George,

I don't think the tread space would matter. The pressure is applied to the smooth wall interior of the tire. So the total load is what it is. Another way to look at it is that if you could measure the pressure beneath the tread itself, it would be greater than that measured on the gauge on the tire stem.

My only issue with the method is the propagation of error. What is the plus/minus on your paper distance measurement, and what is the plus/minus on your tire gauge?

For fun I tested a tire with three different tire gauges I had. The differences were surprising.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Thursday, August 20, 2015 - 01:58 pm:

Don't forget the other items that are additional to the car for figuring weight. Tools, gas cans, jacks, personal gear etc that is loaded in the car before you put it on the trailer.


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