Best way of applying gaskets to your engine

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Best way of applying gaskets to your engine
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 01:17 am:

There have been several threads lately regarding how best to install various gaskets, so since I have been very successful in the application of the gaskets to the engine of my 1926 coupe, I thought I would re-visit the subject and attach three threads detailing the procedure, which is time consuming and requires patience, but is well worth it in the end, if done properly.

I rebuilt my engine back in 2010 using the method outlined in the attached threads and my engine is still virtually leak free. Jim Patrick

Basic Procedure: www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/156919.html
Gasketing Complete Engine: www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/313252.html
Gasketing Hogshead: www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/121217.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:13 am:

I've used Ultra Black for a number of years in addition to the new cardboard gaskets. I miss the old cork gaskets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 09:11 am:

Good and useful post Jim. If I may add one very small point .... If you wipe down all surfaces with acetone before applying gasket or "right stuff" you will be sure of a good seal. A greasy or oily surface gives a good chance of leaks down the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 10:55 am:

Good point Bud. It's always a good idea to wipe down the painted surfaces with a strong, fast drying solvent that won't leave a residue such as naptha, or acetone to ensure a good bond. If the surfaces are bare and unpainted, lacquer thinner would be my first choice. It is also important to be sure all rust has been removed. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 02:44 pm:

i always put the pan on last!!!!!!!!!!!!.charley


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