Should I paint the new gas tank?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Should I paint the new gas tank?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:35 am:


I guess not. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Matheny on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 10:07 am:

I never do...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 10:22 am:

Mine was galvanized


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 12:26 pm:

Don't be penny wise and pound foolish, paint it with a good rust inhibiting paint, If you have some old inner tubes cut some as cushions for your tank mounting brackets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 12:33 pm:

Steve, I do not believe they were ever painted, just plain galvanized. It will last longer than you will. :-) :-) and as a side note, paint is very hard to get to stick to galvanize ... there are special primers, ect, but I would leave it unpainted. My 2 cents worth ....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 12:43 pm:

I painted my old tank 35 years ago. The paint didn't stay but the galvanizing still looks good.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 12:43 pm:

I see no reason to paint the exterior a galvanized gas tank.

The exterior of the original, 98 year old gas tank of my unrestored roadster does not have a rust problem.

I believe it is cadmium plated, as it does not have the snowflake pattern of the zinc(?) galvanized tanks sold today.

(The straps have been re-painted because I removed the tank when I had a buddy of mine clean the interior via the tumbling method.)

If you do paint the exterior of a gas tank, you better be sure the paint is impervious to gasoline. I know someone who painted the exterior of his original tank and if gas gets spilled on it, the paint lifts.

1


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Schultz_Sheboygan,WI on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 01:37 pm:

What about the cowl tanks in the 26/27's? Were they not painted?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 02:02 pm:

I have what I believe is an NOS 26-27 tank that has a light coat of black paint on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 02:15 pm:

The under-seat tanks were not painted.
To pain over galvanizing you must first wash with vinegar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 02:47 pm:

Aaron,

I took a bath in vinegar and then went out to the shop and painted my tank but the paint still didn't stick :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brian Sullivan, Powell WY on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 04:38 pm:

Don't powder coat it either. Things melt, that should not melt (if you still want it to contain liquids afterwards).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 04:39 pm:

I guess it depends on your point of view. _Stop here. _Seriously, stop here. _While I'm new to the care and feeding of century-old antique cars (and for that reason, you should take what I say with a grain of salt)... http://dictionary.reference.com/help/faq/language/e21.html
... I do know something about keeping old warbirds airworthy in a modern context, and the question of how much to compromise with historical authenticity remains the same.

American WWII aircraft were built to be durable in the sense that they could absorb and shake off a lot of battle damage, bring the boys back home and remain serviceable over the course of little more than 100 combat hours. _For instance, because it was intended for a limited lifetime of service, the F4U Corsair was assembled with its aluminum skins spot-welded onto the frame instead of using flush-rivets. _That facilitated faster and cheaper manufacture of greater production numbers. _In a modern context, when a Corsair is restored, the intent is to make the airplane last as long as possible, so replacement skins are flush-riveted to the frame. _Such conversion is expensive as hell and a significant departure from historical accuracy, but for the purpose of longevity and ease of maintenance, restoration shops do that (and I'm not sure whether the spot-welding equipment specific to this particular job still exists, so that might be another reason).

Back in the eighties when I was involved, almost nobody finished warbirds up in correct, flat-olive-drab camo-paint because it was impossible to keep clean, couldn't be waxed and didn't last very long. _Instead, we went with glossy. _Where an airplane was supposed to be finished in natural, bare aluminum, we went with silver paint to protect from corrosion.

In the case of P-47 Thunderbolt restorations, Hamilton-Standard propellers replaced the original Curtiss-Electric props because the FAA wouldn't allow them to be overhauled (just assembled from NOS parts). _As often as not, the turbocharger system was either disconnected or removed entirely for fire-safety, reduced maintenance and easier access to the fuselage interior. _





Now, to me, that was one heck of a serious compromise because the Jug's turbo system extended along most of the length of the fuselage and was very much a part of the airplane's heart and soul—and you can compare that to replacing the Model T's flywheel-magneto/4-coil/commutator ignition with a Volkswagen distributor.

While it's true Henry's intent was to build a car that would last, I don't think he was envisioning his Model T being preserved in safe (okay, relatively safe), road-worthy condition across the span of two world wars, six manned Moon landings, way too many mood-rings, pet-rocks and leisure-suits, tickle-me-Elmo, the rise and fall of AOL and cell-phones that make Mr. Spock's flip-open communicator and tri-corder look pitiful and hilarious at the same time. _Yet, outside of attrition from accidents of absolute destruction, or total replacement of fossil-fuel, we can reasonably expect our Tin Lizzies to last another century. _As the temporary custodian of one such artifact, I must admit to having fudged quite a lot with historicity—and what with Lang's, Snyder's and Mac's catalogs full of brake-lights, turn-signals and the like, so have very many of us.

Geeze, I'm so darned pedantic and verbose, I can hardly stand myself, but... having typed this much; in for a penny, in for a pound (and ain't nobody forcing you to read my gobbledygook). _Thanks to guys like Don Lang and whomever it is that actually builds the things, inexpensive, replacement drum-type fuel tanks will always be in goodly supply, so I guess there's no real reason to go to the trouble of painting a galvanized can. _Far better is it to make sure all your connections are tight and that you're not using copper fuel line.
There. I'm finally finished. _Remember: Grain of salt. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 05:51 pm:

A great response, Bob. My '27 tank is as original, and my wheels are natural wood. I can't seem to find the turbocharger though... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 10:59 am:

Somewhere along the line, Ford switched from galvanizing to zinc on the gas tanks. Anyone know when? My guess would be when they went to the oval tank, but that's only a guess. I bought a NOS oval gas tank at Chickasha about ten years ago for $100. No one would touch it. It's on my car now. Even then the reproductions were more money.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 11:10 am:

Larry, Galvanizing is is the process of applying a protective zinc coating to steel or iron, be it electrically or hot dipped. Was the process changed over the years?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 11:28 am:

Every 26-27 under cowl tank that I have ever had (that weren't covered with surface rust), were flat black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 12:27 pm:


Roger is correct. These rims are hot-dip galvanized, which means they're zinc-coated. Hot-dip or electroplated, Galvanized = Zinc.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 01:14 pm:

If you ever want to paint galvanized parts, you need to get a special primer. Aircraft primer is real expensive, but that is what I have used. If anyone out there knows of a less expensive primer, I would like to know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 01:43 pm:

Maybe a phosphoric acid prep? Just guessing. I haven't tried it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 05:17 am:

I painted the gas tank on my TT (see my profile picture) with Rustoleum Cold Galvanizing paint. Never had any problem with it. Gas didn't seem to bother it at all. JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 07:39 am:

Just put the gas tank in and fuggetaboutit. The original tanks in my '12, 14, 15 and '17 all have lasted this long with no paint. I don't see any reason to do that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 10:25 am:

Agreed. On the other hand, all my 26-27 tanks have paint on them that used to be black. I assume they came from the factory with it, so it's OK with me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 02:32 pm:

Steve Jelf, Will you quit worrying about the paint on the tank and stick the darn thing in the car so we can see if it fixes the problem . :-) :-) Now is not the time to be having a philosophical discussion about tanks being painted or not. We are all holding our breath that the tank was the problem and everything is solved, and OK in Jelf-Land. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 03:30 pm:

Yes I will, but probably not until the weekend. The sediment bowl outlet is so chewed up that you can't use a wrench on it, so I'm going to build it up with new brass and borrow the use of a mill at the juco to finish it. I'm very averse to spending $70 for a new sediment bulb just to get the outlet. Tune in again for late-breaking developments. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By kep on Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 03:22 am:

Phosfuric acid will remove all the zinc, so don't use it for painting the tank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter Kable - Kiama NSW OZ on Thursday, August 27, 2015 - 04:26 am:

Zinc can be applied to steel in a number of ways the most common way after manufacturing the steel product is to dip it into hot zinc but the sheet metal used for making tanks and other things needing a rust proof finish is done by a different process. the sheets of steel actually rolls of steel are acid cleaned by passing them through a tank and then moved through a vat of hot zinc and finally through rollers which smooth out the zinc surface producing a smooth zinc coating as shown in Erik Johnson's photo. This material is then cut into sizes to make tanks in this case. It is difficult to dip the plain steel tank into zinc once assembled if not impossible due to the waste of zinc trapped inside the tank and the risk of the trapped air expanding and pressurizing the tank.

The vinegar process is to wash off the flux (acid) that can be present on hot dipped galvanising .

Phosphoric acid is not the correct acid, zinc has its own conditioner (acid called Lithoform here in Australia) something which now has not been easy to obtain so probably not in the USA either but as mentioned it can be painted with the correct primer. You should check with the paint companies who have specifications for its painting. Many products are zinc coated and painted without any peeling taking place but you need the correct materials. All our bus bodies are usually clad in zinc coated steel panels before painting

After all that the tank does not need to be painted and wasn't.


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