Changing Tires

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Changing Tires
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 08:44 pm:

Am changing a tire on a 1926 T. The tires are 21Ē on wire-spoked wheels. They are nylon Universal tires and still have the nubins on them, both on sidewall and bottom. When I get the tire iron behind the bead, I get NO stretch out of the tire to pull it past the rim. I am afraid I will rip the tire/bead if I pry too hard. Would setting them in the sun to heat up help? I am not sure how old they are, but they look almost new; no cracking or road wear. ANY SUGGESTIONS?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black SC/FL on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 08:55 pm:

make sure the tire is broken loose from the wheel and push it down on the opposite side from where your tire tool is inserted. That should allow the tire to come over the rim. Just like a modern tire!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:08 pm:

Mike: I was sure it is broken from the rim; but will give that a try. Maybe it wasnít broken all the way around. Iíve changed tires before, but have not run into this. I have four to do. Thanks, Chuck




Tire_Rim

Tire_Rim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:09 pm:

21' wire wheels have a drop center. Is the tire free on both sides of the rim and is the part of the tire opposite from where you have your tire iron moving into the drop center? In order to pull it over the rim it must be in the dropped center of the wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:11 pm:

Jack: Okay, not sure what Ďdrop centerí means. How do I tell if it is drop center? Chuck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By mike_black SC/FL on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:21 pm:

If you sawed the wheel in half where it's at on your pallet, and picked it up and looked at the cross section where the tire sits, you'll see that the center of the wheel is lower than the part where the tire bead rides. That lowest part is the dropped center. You have a dropped center wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:25 pm:

Until a better explanation comes along:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Dufault on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:26 pm:

Mike types faster !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:44 pm:

Okay, thatís what I thought Ďdrop centerí was. Went out and tried again; tire does not want to cooperate and stay compressed in the drop center. So I may have to use some C-clamps to compress it. Still not much give in the tire. I actually have eight to change, so this may take some time. It is almost past my bed time, so will try this tomorrow after work. THANK for your help! Chuck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:51 pm:

Chuck, these days modern tyre shops have machines which will handle 21" T wire wheels. They can set them so that nary a scratch occurs on your paintwork and they can fit the tyres in a wink.
I have long given up fitting tyres on wire wheels when they can do it so well with no damage at all.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 09:57 pm:

Allan: Thanks, I will check with the local tire shop. Just thought they would laugh me out of the place if I brought in a T tire/rim? I was talking to a mechanic friend about this and he didnít think they could handle the T rims; but he is more the mechanic. I will check with him again. I am going to bed and you fellows down under are probably just getting up? Chuck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dale Peterson College Place, WA on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 10:11 pm:

You only need one side to fall down into the recess at a time if both will not go. Get one side all the way off then the other.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Zibell, Huntsville, AL on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 10:35 pm:

If all else fails, take it to a motorcycle shop. Their machines can easily handle 21 inch tires. They may even balance it for you using spoke weights. I use my Coats 220 manual machine for both motorcycle and T wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, August 24, 2015 - 11:03 pm:

In answer to the other question, yes. Warm tires are easier to change than cold ones. I lay them out in the sun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Benedict, Humboldt, TN on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 08:19 am:

Be very careful using some of the modern tire changers. The new ones have fingers on the bottom that move in to grab the bottom of the rim. They can bend the rim if the operator is not careful and doesn't lower the air pressure. Holding the rim from the top hole seems to be the best hold in my opinion if your using a tire changer. I just mounted 5 wire wheels with no tire irons and water on the bead with my bare 73 year old hands. Getting the bead into the drop center is the trick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 10:06 am:

Okay, I am going to try all these ideas. The closest auto shop is twelve miles; so I would like to do it myself if I can. The nylon tire just seems to have no give. They look new but could be older than I think? Thanks, Chuck


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 10:28 am:

Chuck
Look closely at Dufaults diagram and follow Putnam's instructions. That is just like a modern tires rim i.e. drop center rim.
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff Rhoads on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

One thing worth noting...

"Balloon" tires such as the 4.50 x 21 size used on the 1926-27 Fords have wires in the beads. As a result, they will NOT stretch, no matter how hard you try. That's the reason for the drop-center rims.

Clincher tires (e.g., 30 x 3 and 30 x 3 1/2) contain no wire. They must be stretched to get them onto the rims.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 02:18 pm:

I just changed two tires (30 x 3 1/2) without any extreme problems on a 1919 and 1922. These new cars (1926) are a new learning process to me. This explains a lot! Thanks again, Chuck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 10:11 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/506218/559416.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 11:03 pm:

I changed the tire on the wire-spoked wheel with the drop-center rims. This rim already had a flap around the rim; it was really hard getting the flap back in. So when I read in the above link (always read the instructions after you do something); it says NOT to put a flap in the drop-center rims. Makes sense, so should I take it out? The article says you will have all kinds of problems! Everything is a learning experience. I now also know why they invented tire changing machines!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 - 11:16 pm:

Do you mean rim liner?

A tire flap goes in the tire - it cradles the inner tube between the tire beads. You don't lay a tire flap on a rim and then mount the tire.

A flap is not a rim liner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Wednesday, August 26, 2015 - 10:25 pm:

It had a tire FLAP in it.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration