Question.. Fuel line .........steel or brass?

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Question.. Fuel line .........steel or brass?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 07:01 am:

I bought the brass fuel line a few years ago. What is the history if any on brass used for fuel lines? I have 1913 Runabout , and think it might look good but have not used it yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 07:13 am:

Robert, I have found a number of brass fuel lines on various chassis. Most appear to have been tinned rather than left as brass.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 07:37 am:

Brass works as a fuel line and is what was used by Ford on all T's. Steel will also work, but is harder to install. It's copper that'll work harden the fastest and should be avoided. Use rubber (or the original felt with soap) in the packing nuts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Peter B. Ratledge on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 07:50 am:

Bob,
John Regan wrote in the Model T Times in 1997
ARCHIFACTS.
THe question was (when did the 1909-1925 standard
chassis model T gas supply line change from copper to steel?) The answer is "It was always BRASS according to the blueprints I found in the Henry Ford Museum archives".
I have a brass gas on my 1911.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 07:50 am:

Thanks for the reply......it makes sense that if they had not been tinned we would have made it known who had the right fuel line etc......


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Martin on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 08:02 am:

Robert, The prints and info available state brass was the material, including 26-27 cars. Seemed tubing was allowed for some years as well, and had a pressure test requirement. I do not remember anything about the lines being tinned. Two original lines I have are not tinned, just simply brass tubing with a drawn finish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard E Moore Jr. Pickwick lake Tenn. on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 08:21 am:

They may have used brass in the day but I wouldn't use it on my car. A model T motor shakes a bit and brass fuel line will work harden and crack especially at the carburetor fitting. The line is to close to the exhaust manifold and any fuel leak anywhere is dangerous. Just my 2 cents.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 08:22 am:

Early parts books only list the runabout as a brass feed pipe, no metal type listed for any other body style just it's length.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 08:44 am:

I removed a "mix" of copper and rubber tubing and put brass in on my '12 resto. Looks nice too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 10:01 am:

I believe what Allan says is correct. I have a nos fuel line and it appears to be tin plated. If you buy modern brake tubing, it looks the same. For the doubters, I have a copper line on my '13 that I installed in 1962. The car has way over 50,000 miles on it now and still has that copper line, with ferrules on both ends.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 10:14 am:

Modern brake tubing now comes with a greenish black coating, no doubt cheaper to make than the earlier tin plating. I just installed a new steel line in Popeye along with a cleaned original tank and a new sweet potato so that I can forget about fuel problems for as long as I own this car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 10:29 am:

There is another option (Oh boy, will I catch it for this!)

I run a copper line over and along the frame rail terminating it at about the middle of the floor boards. It is connected to a shutoff valve attached to the frame rail and then about 12" of rubber gas line hose to the carb. A small slit is cut in the floor board so I can turn the shutoff valve off and on. In case of an engine fire I won't have to reach into the engine compartment to shut the fuel off. Also means I can turn the fuel on without raising the hood.

The short length of rubber gas line means no work hardening of the copper tubing. The small slit in the floorboards is covered by the floor mat. Very easy to disconnect fuel line for work on the carb.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 02:44 pm:

So Larry, are you going to change that copper line soon? Or will you wait until the car burns down to prove us doubters correct?


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration