OT- Any Dodge Guys Here?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: OT- Any Dodge Guys Here?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 09:50 pm:

Was thinking about looking at this 50 Dodge that caught my eye, but never owning a Dodge before was wondering if anyone has experience with these....Any thoughts?

http://boston.craigslist.org/sob/cto/5163142347.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 09:56 pm:

John,

That is a beautiful car & the price seems fair.

Flathead 6 ?


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 10:17 pm:

Jim, i think it has a 230 C.I straight 6..kinda weird that they didn't post any pics of the engine compartment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 10:41 pm:

I have a 2012 Ram pickup. LOVE it


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 10:46 pm:

John,

Simple durable engine probably w/ oil bath air cleaner.

Beautiful paint job.

Seems to be a motivated Seller.


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 10:59 pm:

Thanks Tyrone..:-)...Jim, it looks very clean from the photos, hope it looks that good in person.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Lay,,,,,,,,,,,,,,Lancaster Ca. on Saturday, August 29, 2015 - 11:41 pm:

I had a 49 Plymouth much like that Dodge and it was great. I was told they had an issue with overheating and warping the cyl. Head but I did not have that problem with mine and live in the desert. If the drive train is as good as the rest of the car looks I would jump on it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 12:05 am:

Thanks Scott, appreciate your input..I love the body style especially being a coupe.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 12:59 am:

Known as "Keller's Three-Box Styling, the '50 Dodge is "right in there" for that
transitional period between the slippery 40's fastback look and the more upright,
big glass theme of the mid-late 50's. K.T. Keller was Walter P. Chrysler's personal
pick to succeed him in the company leadership, because of his practical mindset.
Keller was a big "hat guy" and pushed for a roofline high enough that one could
enter and exit the car without knocking their hat off, and this car is a great example
of Mr. Keller's desire.

They are still on the "mechanical" side, in terms of driving. But anyone hip to a
Model T would have no issues with one. I hear late-50's Mopar guys bellyache
about how they drive "like a truck". By '56, Mopar was building some really nice
riding/driving cars.

Contact the WPC Club for good parts/maintenance contacts.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 01:27 am:

Thanks Burger, never owned a Dodge before, but will keep everything you said in mind when i look at it...thank you for the info.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 02:21 am:

John,

You just do not see very many Dodge cars from that time period - I don't think I have ever hauled one come to think of it.

I like the look & that green color !


Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 04:10 am:

I owned a 48 Desoto for years (similar running gear), bit thirsty and not a lot of grunt for the fuel cost but very reliable. I used it for towing 4wd's on a trailer to Rally's and it done well. This car looks very nice, good lines and very presentable and sounds a good price. My Desoto was the best car I've ever owned for driving on Gravel roads especially if I pushed it hard.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Parker on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 10:06 am:

Yes, John, I have had experience with a '50 Dodge. Mostly good.

I had a 1950 Dodge four door sedan with the fluid transmission. You could start off in high gear but it took a while to catch up with the traffic. Sort of made you feel you had an automatic trans I guess.

I believe I would be more excited if it didn't have that fluid trans. Also, any oil burning would cool my desire quickly. Dodges were rather notorious for that.

Great ride, nice wood grain, etc. I took it to college in 1959. It was a good car but a challenge to keep oil in it. Threw a rod in Kingsbury, Texas, in 1962. Oil won, kid lost and Uncle Ernst sold it in his car lot on Nogalitos St., San Antonio.

Ken in Texas


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 10:20 am:

Pretty sharp. The over heating condition with the 6 concerns a water tube that ran front to back in the engine on the valve side. Originally made of steel they rot out and over heating is the result. Their still available in steel and brass. Believe you pulled the rad. & water pump to get to it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 10:22 am:

I had a 1940 DeSoto 4-door sedan back in the 70's. It was my daily driver, and I liked it a lot. It was really comfortable cruising on the highway and a very dependable car. Mine had a 3-speed stick with overdrive; I don't have any experience with the Fluid Drive tranny.

I like the shape of the top on that Dodge coupe. It's a nice-looking car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Nicholas Lingg - Tarboro, NC on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 10:36 am:

DO NOT buy one with the Fluid Drive You'll get to dislike it. IMHO


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 10:39 am:


My 1951 Dodge rides and drives like a truck, but it's a solid old thing, and mighty handy. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 10:54 am:

1950 Dodge Coronet had a 230 Cu. In. flathead six that was pretty-much bulletproof. The engine was slightly larger then the Plymouth six - but the same design. The little Plymouth was a bit faster accelerating due to the Dodge's cool, but power-absorbing fluid-drive transmission that is shifted with a foot pedal if my memory is correct. In that era, Chrysler-built cars had all sorts of different transmissions. All were reliable, but with the exception of the straight three-speed manual, service will require someone with specialized skills. The Centerplane brakes are - well, interesting. A little bit of a pain to service, and prone to squealing, but they work well enough. You will need a puller to remove the rear brake drums. I believe that electric wipers were an option. I had a '49 Plymouth and the build quality was excellent - way better then the cars of today. My Plymouth had the best manual side window regulators of any car I have ever seen (including Rolls-Royce). About 1 1/2 effortless turns would completely raise or lower the windows. If that Dodge is as nice as it looks, I think the price is reasonable. One tip if you buy the car - Mopar sixes of that era were notoriously hard to start in wet or foggy weather. A good set of modern, insulated spark plug wires will solve the problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 10:58 am:

I forgot to mention that Mopars of that era had right-hand threads on the left-side wheel bolts, left-hand threads on the right.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 11:13 am:

My grandmother had a 1950 Meadowbrook 4-door sedan and later my dad bought a 1951 Coronet 4-door sedan. I drove the '50 occasionally and the '51 was our family car when I got my driver's license (took the test in it, in fact).

I have observed that there is often some confusion about "fluid drive." Both our Dodges had what Dodge called "Fluid Drive" - a fluid coupling in the drive train that essentially meant that you could come to a complete stop with just the brake and not stall the engine. The '50 had a standard three-speed column shift. (Because of the fluid coupling, my grandmother only used second and high for driving.) The '51 had, in addition to Fluid Drive, Gyromatic, a semi-automatic transmission. It was also a column shift, but a little different. Reverse and neutral were the same, there was nothing where low would be on a standard shifter, where second would be was Low Range and where high would be was Drive Range. For ordinary driving, the shifter was put in Drive Range and left there. From a stop, stepping on the gas started you off in the equivalent of second gear in a standard three-speed. When you reached speed (20-25 mph), you released the gas pedal briefly until you heard a click. You were now in the equivalent of high in a standard three-speed. A lot of people back then used the name "Fluid Drive" to mean "Gyromatic," but they were two different features.

P.S. When they were shooting the movie "Game of Their Lives" in St. Louis, the year was 1950 so they had scrounged up a bunch of late forties and 1950 cars. I knew the guy who organized the cars and he asked me if I would be a driver. One evening, I ended up driving a 1950 Dodge around a single block downtown for several hours. I had forgotten how many turns a 1950 Dodge steering wheel has from lock to lock (74, I think... :-) ). In any case, my arms were tired by the end of the many, many takes of that scene.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 11:15 am:

John,
Great looking car, and loaded (clock, radio, etc.) and the woodgraining looks good. You couldn't restore one for that price, IMHO. Yes, the one (ok, two) weak links on that engine is the water distribution tube & rod bearings. There's supposed to be a restrictor in the oil system to get more oil to the rod bearings (it's been too long since I worked on one to remember all the details). I have an unrebuilt 51 Plymouth engine in my '53 Dodge P/U that I checked the distributor tube (mine is brass) and put new rod bearings in it. I have 40 lbs oil pressure on a cold engine, and it runs great.
The fluid clutch has been recently worked on and sealed, so you should be good to go. Very reliable drive train, average gas mileage for the time period. Dependable Dodge is how they were sold. OH, and keep that woodgrain out of the sun, the clear coat likes to go bad with UVs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 11:16 am:

It's the other way around, John. LH lug nuts on the driver's side through 1970. Chrysler went to all RH thread lug nuts starting in 1971. I always had to warn the tire shops about the LH lug nuts when I took in my 1969 Dodge Dart Convertible, 1969 Plymouth Valiant 2-door sedan, and 1970 Dodge Charger in for new tires. My 1971 Plymouth Barracuda convertible and my 1971 Plymouth GTX both have RH lug nuts all the way around.

Here's a link to a page explaining Chrysler's reasoning for the LH lug nuts:

:-)http://www.moparmax.com/columns/magnante/v_5-1.html


gtx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 02:20 pm:

It's not a dodge but a plymouth and I love it
the dodge looks like a good car from the photos


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 02:44 pm:

If you do buy it and need parts, beware of the highly advertised snake in Massachusetts (not Roberts, the other guy). He sent me the wrong parts, which I returned, and he stiffed me for the dough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 10:42 pm:

One of my Model T mentors was a life-long mechanic by trade. When I had my '40 DeSoto, he told me that if you take off on a trip in a Ford or Chevy, you'll probably need to work on it before you get home. When you're in a MoPar car, it'll get you there and back. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 11:27 pm:

I'm not a Chrysler person but I've wanted to build a 1951 Chrysler 310 for a long time. Don't know why. I just like the look of the Ghia body. It was so advanced and modern. Not to mention an early "muscle car". I have a 1951 Chrysler Imperial with the first year Hemi to use as a chassis and parts.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 12:11 am:

That '50 Dodge is very similar to my '47 Canadian Dodge, other than the fluid drive transmission (mine has three-on-the-tree). I've had my car since 1992 and its been my year 'round daily driver the past couple years.

Since 2008 my good friend Jerry and I have driven it to 35 US states, three provinces, and all four North American coasts. It has been astonishingly reliable.

Photos below are: on the Ice Road to Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories (furthest north one can drive in Canada), in the Utah desert, and at the Packard Motors plant in Detroit.






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 12:32 am:

Oh my! That last picture takes me back a few years. That '47 Dodge strongly resembles our '41 Plymouth. Except for the color of the tarp, that looks like our car on its way to the mountains.


I'm the guy in the striped shirt. This is before Dad made a luggage carrier to go on top of the car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 12:58 am:

John,

If you can handle the mechanical feel of a T, you'll be fine with the Fluid Drive and other details
of this car. As mentioned earlier, most complaints I ever hear about cars of this period are from
people who expect them to perform like modern cars. If you go into it expecting an old car
driving experience, you will be handsomely rewarded and have no disappointments.

Incidentally, I hear people say Model T's are too much of a hassle to drive, and that post-30
cars are the "only way to go". I guess it is all about the experience one seeks. If I wanted a #@!
Acura, I'd buy one, you know ? Those guys can keep their modern this-n-that. I am looking to
escape the modern experience forced upon me in most things I have to do these days, thank you. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 09:46 am:

Steve, I'm not surprised to hear that the Canadian Dodges of that era (designated D25, vs the American D24 models) were actually badge-engineered Plymouths with the same sheet metal and the shorter wheelbase. Hence Canadian Dodges, being essentially Plymouths in disguise, were not available with the Fluid Drive transmission.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 09:52 am:

Chris that looks close to my 1946 but mine is a coupe and yours has suicide doors


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 09:57 am:

What I like about this forum ...

On most days - there is a seemingly endless supply
of interest & positive comments on topics that are
a bit off the subject of a Model T ....

And I really enjoy that !

I learned to drive on a 1950 Dodge stake bed truck
that my Dad had to deliver furniture in the family business.



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 10:26 am:

C'mon now, Jim. Check your "car guy card". Says right there that one is to harbor a deep
bias against all cars but the ONE company you happen to like. There shall be no liking of multiple
makes or interest taken thereof. Choose ONE, all others are to be discussed as if made of feces.

Please, make a note of it. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 11:05 am:

One of my memories of that 41 is Dad driving it down the steep road from Mineral King with Mom sitting beside him holding up the shift lever to keep it in second gear.


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