How to Bench Test this Generator?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: How to Bench Test this Generator?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 05:56 pm:

Hey Guys,
Please be nice here, I am not getting any reading on my ammeter while driving but it will show a discharge with lights on. I pulled the generator off the '27 and want to test it. I can get it to spin with a 6v charger but want to test and see how to adjust the output.

I have the MTFCA electrical handbook- but being electrically ignorant on these things, I could use a little help.

What is the best/simplest way to measure the output? I do own a voltmeter.

Thanks,
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 06:54 pm:

I would pull the gear off and replace it with a pulley then turn it with a 1/4 or 1/3 hp motor. It should read up to 30 volts. Some times oil leaks through the seal and contaminates the commutator. I have used a swab of ether, gasoline or alcohol on the commutator when it is running to clean it and it usually works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 07:13 pm:

Silly question- but which part on the generator is the commutator?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 07:35 pm:

If you want to spin it to check the output...just use an electric drill/variable speed/cordless, etc. Connect the drill chuck to the generator gear with duct tape-type coupling... No need to remove the gear or set up any elaborate motor drive system.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 07:48 pm:

I assume then a voltmeter: (+) on the large terminal and (-) on a case screw? Would that work?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 07:48 pm:

The commutator is the center piece that turns. Just for info, the stator is the winding that are fixed and the cutout the little metal can on top.
You can spin it with an electric drill, it turns clockwise front he front. Best connect it to a battery though not essential. When spinning it should generate greater than six volts on the top terminal, with or without the cutout in place.
You really should read the MTFCA Electrical book and take the time to understand. If I offered a million bucks, you would learn it word perfect, so it is matter of will power. That works on the grand kids, so it should work on you....
Have fun.....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Sunday, August 30, 2015 - 08:18 pm:

Okay, I took John's idea and spun with a cordless drill as fast as it would turn. Here are the results- see pic.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 12:20 pm:

Is your meter reading 12 volts or .12 volts? I bench tested a 6 volt generator off a later car and it put out 40 volts. If 12 volts is your out put I would suggest it is adequate to charge a 6 volt battery with a proper functioning cut out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 04:21 pm:

Those cheap digital multimeters can show erratic results in electrically noisy environments, so I would not trust the reading. Try an analog meter, the results will be valid.
Of course the reading MAY be valid......
Using a cheap digital voltmeter even on at the battery when charging with an alternator will give incorrect results. The reason is a combination of the signal from the alternator, which is far from DC and the signal converter in the meter requires an steady signal during the whole time of the conversion. It is fairly easy to add a few components to the meter to fix the problem, but then the cost would be more than $5...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Monday, August 31, 2015 - 05:25 pm:

If the generator has residual field and is turning in the correct direction, it should load down the drill as it generates into the field.
Otherwise there is a problem.


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