Have a chance to buy a TT

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Have a chance to buy a TT
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Benedict, Humboldt, TN on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:28 am:

I have a chance to buy a TT with a Ruxstell and a Warford trans. I know the rearend will not fit my 26 coupe but will the Warford bolt up? The asking price in $3500. Thanks, Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:37 am:

Is it the 26 TT on craigslist? If you JUST want a Warford for your coupe (you're not interested in the TT) buy a new KC Warford for $2800. The KC is far better than the original ones plus you don't know the condition of the unit in the TT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Benedict, Humboldt, TN on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:50 am:

Yes it is the same one. I figured I could pull the warford and then sell the TT for $3K after some TLC.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:57 am:

Bob -- You don't just "pull the Warford." Removing it will leave a 12" gap in the truck's driveline, which will require the replacement of the driveshaft, d/s housing, and radius rods.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 10:31 am:

Ditch the coupe and drive the TT ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 10:37 am:

Mike is, of course, right. Also, if the coupe didn't previously have a Warford you have the mirror image of the same task installing it. The radius rods, drive shaft and drive shaft housing will all need to be shortened.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Benedict, Humboldt, TN on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 01:41 pm:

As Burger suggested.....I believe I'll ditch the TT idea and drive my coupe. Thanks Burger you stopped me from making a serious mistake. Bob


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 01:45 pm:

That's not exactly what Burger suggested, but it'll probably work out for you. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 08:24 pm:

I am in serious withdrawal from driving my TT. Had a sewer failure that has
caused me to initiate a total replumbing of my house. 30% of the walls are
torn open. What a mess ! I plan to take the old iron offline tomorrow and move
over to the new copper before the end of the day, solving some serious problems
of freezing pipes every winter. Getting real sick of working 15 hours a day and
not having any fun time. :-P


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 10:02 pm:

My guess is the TT would have a cast iron Warford. I would want the aluminum case Warford. Lots lighter. You might want to check to be sure it is an overdrive gear on that TT Warford.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Plank - Three Way, TN on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 10:56 pm:

Bob, you need a TT. Go ahead and buy it. That way you can occupy another space in the T barn and you can go on our TT tours with us. We could even have slow races. I'm sure your wife won't mind. I'll even ask her for you!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Barrett in Auburn Ca. on Wednesday, September 02, 2015 - 11:11 pm:

Buying a TT truck is rarely a mistake. Pick it up and enjoy both of them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 12:32 am:

Burger and erik got it RIGHT haven even got mine one the road yet and found it be a super fun project and made a lot of new friends and met a lot of old ones who been more helpful then ever once they found out I had a TT


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Benedict, Humboldt, TN on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 08:15 am:

Dennis....Don't forget to remind her that her Lincoln will be sitting out in the weather all winter while the TT will occupy her spot in the garage. Lot's of luck to you with that idea. I figure I have a couple of years to go before Ricky's new T barn is ready for occupancies.
It's strange how wanting to buy another T can be influenced by the garage space of the wife's present car. I sometimes wonder who is really the king of this house. She's always told me I can be the head of the house and she will remain the neck, where she turns I turn. Love her bunches.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 05:27 pm:

That is one of the wonderful things about a TT! There is a less of an expectation for it to be kept "pristine". Therefore, It can be stored outside, covered as needed. Radiator drained if cold enough. Hose it off, good to go. Doubles as yard art and transportation.
I had a TT about 30 years ago. I may yet have to get another one.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 06:03 pm:

Bob B.'s comment about garage space hits a nerve. My TT takes up the wife's car space in our garage. While it's true that a TT can get away with that rustic look, I've always been reluctant to store it outdoors. It still has 100% original wood stake bed and cab (what's left of it). Most of the paint is long gone. Letting it sit out in the weather would just assure it would soon be a pile of rotten wood. It's been just as it is my entire life and I'm trying to keep it that way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 08:24 pm:

Just how much longer (or taller and wider???) is a TT than a T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 09:04 pm:

My TT measures 86" to the top of the cab. This is a closed cab truck. I do not have a C-cab
on a frame to get a measurement for comparison.

Length varies with frame extensions for the auxiliary transmissions and special uses each truck
was subjected to. I can measure my 26 for length. It is probably a good example of the shortest
length an all-stock TT would be with an uncut frame and "Ford Truck" bed. Maybe the express
boxes were shorter ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 09:37 pm:

Wheel base of a stock tt is approx 2 feet longer bed and other this change this


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 10:15 pm:

Constantine,

The widest part of my TT is the front fenders, which are exactly the same as a regular T. I'm not sure what the overall length of my TT is, but the bed is 5' wide and 8' long. Reserving the right to be an inch off I think the length of a TT, axle center to axle center, is 120" while a regular T is either 99" or 100", I can't remember which. The wheel base (width tire center to tire center) is the same for a T and a TT. They use the same front axle.

I can't speak to height. My TT is an '18, and so the cab/bed were not built by Ford. The early trucks with custom cabs could be anything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, September 03, 2015 - 11:20 pm:

OK, ... official, real time measurements of a 26 closed cab TT with no frame
extension, fitted with OE "Ford Truck" stake/flat bed:

Bed: 100-1/2" (from leading edge against cab to outside edge of rear stake pockets)

Bed-to-leading-edge-of-front-tire: 86-1/2"

Total: 187", or 15' 7"

Widest point on truck is bed at 65-1/4" from outside edge of stake pocket to
same on other side.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 06:31 pm:

Thanks Henry and Burger,

Any idea how much heavier a TT rolling chassis (with engine, springs, front and rear axles, etc.) is compared a T rolling chassis?

Also, how rare are TTs with a roadster type top? I cannot remember seeing one for sale in recent times.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 07:06 pm:

I don't know the comparative weights, but a TT is probably a couple hundred pounds heavier.

I haven't seen a TT with a roadster body in quite a while either. I do like them and would certainly consider using one if I were putting together a TT. I would imagine they are fairly uncommon since roadster bodies are so desirable for other uses, but there are a few around.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brass TT on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 08:18 pm:

To answer Constantine in OZ, "how much heavier?"
BLOODY heavy ! Once you have a T rear axle assembly disconnected, average man should be able to hold it with one arm & easily walk with it in 2 hands. A young, fit adult male will struggle to lift a TT rear assembly, forget walking with it. A TT Ruxtel axle is a 2 man lift. From memory when i shipped one, 180Lb without brakes etc. TT frame would be 3x a T frame in weight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 08:35 pm:

According to Bruce's book, the 1917 car chassis weighed in at 980 lbs, while the TT chassis was 1,450.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 08:37 pm:

Note to "Brass TT" above: That's an odd username, since Ford never made a brass TT.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 08:59 pm:

There was a lot of early t truck conversions to turn your car into a heavy duty truck
But I thing biulding one if money permits


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 12:18 am:

Oh God ! I am in the process of building a high speed Truckstell. Have a couple in
the shop. They are STUPID heavy ! Rear wheels are 10x as heavy as the fronts (common
to the cars). And let's not overlook the rear springs ! 8^O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 12:31 am:

I have just sold set of solid rear rubber wheels wood spokes weight about 5 lbs steel rim with rotten rubber tired the scales at 86lbs each


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Lovejoy, So Cal on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 12:42 am:

I made a special steel table just for my TT rear end when I rebuilt it - heavy is right


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 12:56 am:

Speaking of heavy, ... those springs *might* squash down under a heavy load,
but they sure don't flex to take out the jar of a bump in the road. They will toss
even that heavy rear end (lying loose on the rear bed) up in the air like an empty
milk jug !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Brass TT on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 - 08:28 am:

FYI, for 'moderately comfortable' motoring on sealed roads, you only need the 1st 2 leaves, main plus the next one, put a teflon shim between them, then fill the space where they bolt into the chassis cross member with either a machined to fit block of steel or extra hardwood, soaked in hot oil prior to fitting. I've never seen a restored TT loaded with real weight yet.


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