Oregon or Bust!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Oregon or Bust!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 02:08 am:

Posting from Centralia, WA, three days and 981 miles into our run from Edmonton, AB to Silverton OR for the NWVS' 33rd Annual North West Classic 200-Mile Endurance Run.

This is friend Jerry and my fifth trip to the Pacific Northwest for this Labour Day event (one year we lost confidence in the car near home, and turned back to switch our luggage to my '47 Dodge sedan).

The car has performed near flawlessly this trip. So far. And that racket you hear is me knocking furiously on all wood within reach.

Every year we make a few upgrades before the journey — this time we added hydraulic front brakes, a halogen 6-vt sealed-beam driving light (our driving days are long and we usually get caught out after dark) and a second steering wheel to clear Jerry's generous knee-to-ankle dimensions.

The '24 Speedster has coils, mag, TW timer, Z-head, 3:1 rear gears and AC brakes. Loaded weight with us aboard, all our gear, full gas and spare oil, etc. is 1030 Kg/2266 lb.

We run 45-48 mph on the open road and average 25 MPG CDN, 20.8 US. Our moving average has been 39.0 mph thus far, including 100 miles on the I5 and crawling thru Seattle on the 99 during afternoon rush hour (was there ever a more inapt name??). We've had some rain every day, the heaviest was early this afternoon from the border down into Washington.

Our sole issue with the car was due to my oversight — we swapped out the spindles and spindle arms during the front brake work and I neglected to re-check the toe-in before heading out. 400 miles out we noticed the RF tire was badly worn, particularly on the outside. By happy chance we got connected with a Mr.Jack Frost of Frost T Ranch near Merritt BC, who helped us get things squared away. The worn tire was relegated to reserve status and the replacement is showing basically no wear in almost 600 miles.



The tarp extends over the windshield at night; foot pegs are a welcome addition on long drives; the odd side visor on the driving light keeps most of the spillover glare off the hood. The LH side box is an insulated cooler, the RH side box is storage.



Jerry's wheel is on the column, stock Ford wheel is locked to a bracket on the RH side.



Front brake drums, shoes and backing plates are '67 Triumph Spitfire rears. They are actuated by a Toyota Corolla clutch master cylinder hooked up to the the existing outside brake lever for the AC accessory rear brakes. While far from "powerful" the accessory front and rear are at least the equal of the Ford transmission brake. The LH spring shackle is locked to eliminate side sway whilst cornering (with a similar arrangement on the LH rear)



yikes — just a little too much toe-in!



Boogieing down the I5 this afternoon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 02:41 am:

Thanks for a great update and some awesome pictures. Have a safe trip and lots of fun along the way!

I love what your doing to the speedster!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 02:47 am:

Have a great trip :-)
How much does the front axle flex forward when braking with only a lower wishbone?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 08:41 am:

So you're driving 1,000+ miles to attend a 200-mile "Endurance Run"? Will you participate in the Run? That should be a piece of cake!

Seems to me that you could teach those other guys a thing or two about "Endurance". :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Freighter Jim on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 08:56 am:

Chris,

You two guys look like you are having a great time !

Thanks for posting ...



Freighter Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 12:31 pm:

With all the great scenery and such between Edmonton and Silverton, why did you
choose to tour the I-5 parking lot through the swamps of the wet side ? :-)

I think I'd rather chew my arm off than revisit the rain capitol of the dark world.
30 years was enough ! :-P


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 03:09 pm:

99 through Seattle is always a crawl, except maybe around 1 AM!
I'm with Burger, you're on an adventure, take the scenic routes!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 05:02 pm:

David - Actually,.....make that closer to 3:00a.m. !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 07:24 pm:

Edit: Our T contact in Merritt BC was Jack CROSS not Jack Frost. The chilly mornings must have addled my memory.

Gene: Thanks for your kind words, you and the too-early late Ralph Ricks were my inspiration for the front brake project.

Roger: Difficult to say how much, but it does rotate a bit. Jerry estimated the top of the kingpin moves forward about 3/16", I make it more like 1/8". There may be a second wishbone or similar on this winter's to-do list.

Mike: You could be right about that. And my wife says I could teach almost anybody a thing or two about "crazy".

Burger and David: We've had lots of great scenic route and it was time for some variety — and some rapid miles after a long wait at the border and taking a few wrong turns in the heavy rain south of Sumas. The 99 was for Jerry's benefit as he had never been through Seattle.
_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

We arrived in Silverton an hour ago with 1,135 miles under our belts door-to-door.

THe car must have known I was bragging up its fault-free performance last night: A couple minutes after start-up in the hotel parking lot, it began to miss badly on #1. We eventually traced the problem to apparently bad contact between the coil and the coil box terminals. It's hard to know for sure, as one cannot see in the box because of the cowl sheet metal. I'll have to take all the wires off and the box off the firewall to investigate further if the problem continues. For now, a room key card wedged in the back of the box across coils #1 and #2 does the trick.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 07:40 pm:

"...a room key card wedged in the back of the box across coils #1 and #2 does the trick."

Folks used to use Popsicle sticks for that, back when Popsicle sticks were plentiful. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 08:10 pm:

Chris,

Thanks for the update! Looks like you are having a great time. Good luck at the endurance race.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Friday, September 04, 2015 - 09:13 pm:

Harold,
I almost typed that, but I'm seldom up at 3AM, so thought 1AM would be late/early enough--I guess not! Fortunately for me, my niece lives down on 15th ST S. in Beacon Hill area, so I can get off the highway just about where things start backing up (when it's not "rush hour". Love visiting my Niece, but don't understand how folks can live everyday in such crowds.
Always good to get back home!
Barney 5-9-14 a web.JPG


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 02:29 am:

My parents left the Bay Area in 1966 for Seattle. Brilliant choice, Mom and Dad ! By 1976
our farm was being engulfed in rampant sprawl and I am still befuddled by why the notion to
simply leave did not pop into my head until I was involved in a couple wing-ding wrecks at
the hands of the Seattle Stunt Driver's School (pronounced "Daily Rush Hour").

I was done with the 4 hour commutes, the endless rain, the dark and grey, the stunt drivers,
the cheesy sprawl, the McMansion mentality ... it was time to go. I go back now and can
hardly navigate some areas .... like a volcanic lava flow, they've literally laid a second layer
of sprawl over the first one !!!!

Imagine 405 as a two lane highway. What is it today, four lanes of freeway each direction ?

I keep a brass advertising letter opener I found as a kid. It is from the Todd Feed Co. in
Kirkland. It lists all the various farm supplies they sold. The phone number was simply "2".

As Lowell George was quoted as saying ... "Thanks, I'll eat mine here." :-P


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 10:08 am:

Just below my niece's house is a hardware store, Stewarts; they've been there since 1915, in the same building! No streetcars out in front now, but pretty much the same, so there are small pockets of "sanity" in Seattle, but I'm with you Burger!!!
BTW, ain't Spokane a pretty big town now too?
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 12:54 pm:

I hope you found time to stop at Dick's for some Danger Ale and sausage while you were in Centralia. That's one of the coolest shops I've ever visited. They have a family run meat market and they brew phenomenal craft beer too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 03:16 pm:

The key differences between Spokane and "the west side" are:

1. 20 minutes in any direction and you are in the boonies. 10 in many.

2. Rain. Spokane is high desert. Rain is a pleasant break from all the sun. Seattle gets 600 days of rain a year.

3. The freeways and fitting eleventy-billion-skillion mall people into a tight mass of land, pinched between the
Sound and the mountains. As an extension of Point No.1, you can drive for hours and not escape the sprawl.

4. Stunt drivers. Yeah, we get them here too, more and more. But I've seen few places where so many people
will put innocents lives in peril because they are late for a nail appointment.

5. Real estate prices. Whole lotta swamp land over there with million dollar price tags.

6. Attitude. When I left for AFG, it was bad enough. When I came home, I could smoke all the pot I want and
marry another dude. Yeah .... those kind of "initiatives" don't come from Spokane.

7. Spokane is only an hour from Montana. When you go to Montana, you can tell people you are from Spokane.
That's OK. Telling them you are from Seattle (or just "Washington") means they'll assume you mean Seattle, and
you will be welcome in Missoula and nowhere else.

Outside of some dining and entertainment possibilities, I'd be happy to see the whole Puget Sound area returned
to nature and it's inhabitants properly dispensed with. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Constantine in Australia on Saturday, September 05, 2015 - 07:35 pm:

I like the ice-box refreshment cooler you have on the back...after a long day of driving; two, three hundred miles...open it up and relax with a Drambuie or Chivas 12 on the rocks. Period correct as well.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Warwick Landy Traralgon Australia on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 03:45 am:

Great pictures Chris. Thanks for sharing. Nothing like a good long T drive shared with a good buddy!
How do you go with the spray off the wheels in the wet weather?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 09:52 am:

Thanks Warwick, I agree.

We deal with the spray by covering ourselves with it, particularly in corners.

Having said that, when I first built the car in 1992/3, I made a set of very nice fenders out of repro 1935(?) spare tire covers, cut in half. My bracketry was substandard however, and the fenders were soon removed. We've seen more rain this trip than any previous, so are contemplating reinstallation of the fenders on superior brackets.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 09:08 pm:

Well, that was fun!

The run was about 215 miles total, we came in at 4:01 this afternoon roughly mid-pack (22 cars registered, two DNS, two DNF).

Results will be announced at the banquet this evening. Penalties are assessed for missing checkpoints and coming in earlier or later than the target time. Minutes early cost double the points of minutes late.

We usually finish down around #30 or so — with a field of just 18 finishers we are looking at a guaranteed improvement!



We lined up about 8:00 AM for the start



Our rear storage boxes make a dandy photographer's platform.



One poor Model A owner had two flats by lunchtime — we had packed this period tire filler setup the morning we left Edmonton and had been going to give it a try (on someone else's tire of course)



Cylinder pressure from a running engine is used to pump air through the hose into the tire. Sadly, we could only manage 13 PSI after five minutes running.



Finishing line welcoming committee and final checkpoint



And finally, the post-run brew.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 10:26 pm:

Burger,
OK, you made some really good points about the differences. I will agree, Seattle is one strange place! I do like the light rail and the monorail though. . .
:-)
What amazed me is the drive home; didn't get out of 'traffic' until we got below Salem, OR. Was glad we weren't going north, as there was miles and miles of backed up traffic going that direction. And this was a Sunday afternoon!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Sunday, September 06, 2015 - 11:32 pm:

Thanks to Mike Hatley, Bob Rankin and all the other volunteers for their hard work putting on a very enjoyable event.

Correction: the results were announced at the banquet and I had some numbers wrong… 22 cars started with only one DNF.

Target time was 8;00.44. Team Bamfords Garage came in a bit early at 7:54:59, good for 12th place of the 21 finishers.

The oil is changed, the cups are greased, the tank is full, and we're ready for an early start tomorrow.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Elenbaas - Granger, Washington on Monday, September 07, 2015 - 08:35 pm:

Chris, I don't want to steal your thread but this seems a good spot to post this.

We were fortunate to win this year especially considering that it was only our second attempt. Last year we DNF after only about 15 miles, (just prior to the hill that took out Chris' brakes).
It was a great run with lots and lots of turns and some interesting up hills (16%) and down hills (18% with a stop sign at the bottom of it) as recorded by my son in laws phone GPS. (Some of you may have seen him driving this speedster at Cochrane where we were getting the bugs worked out of it.)

Chris, I hope you and Jerry have a great trip home and that we will see you next year when the trophy will be up for grabs again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, September 07, 2015 - 09:32 pm:

How the the TT Division race fall out ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 - 12:11 am:

Now that all u outsiders have trashed our fine city of Seattle, let me offer a couple of suggestions to make the trip thru our beautiful city a bit easier.

WE "locals" have a few secrets which I will share only because u are bretheren of the model t society.

1st going north to south or south to north never never use I-5. Going southbound take 405 at Lynnwood hop in the express lanes and cruise at regular speeds until you get to Renton, then take the 167 southbound again hop in the express lane and again regular speeds. when you reach the 512 take it to I-5 and presto you are south of Tacoma just north of Fort Lewis. You have missed all the traffic and back ups and your blood pressure is lower as a bonus.

Heading north on I-5 just past Ft lewis take the 512 to 167 north to 405 then north to I-5 north of Lynnwood. Again using the express lanes.

Now then the next piece of advice is the best kept secret of locals, timing is the most important piece of the equation, we call it T to T. Tuesday to Thursday 10 -2. Stay within those days and times and u will breeze thru.

Lets see was in Spokane for the swap meet this summer. There was a wreck in the interstate and because there is no viable alternative we sat there for nearly 2 hours while the local gestapo tried to figure out what the heck to do. I'm guessing they had never had to deal with 2 separate accidents going the same way at the same time. They were beyond their ability to get the traffic moving. There were 3 city cop cars 5 cops and they had no idea what to do, so they stood there and talked to each other rather than get the traffic moving. We could have gotten by on the shoulder but the city clowns had that blocked with their cop cars. Me thinks they need some traffic control training.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 - 12:45 am:

BCG -

Funny twist on this, but our wanting-to-look-like-bigshots news people over here
like to talk about "traffic" as if we have some. You'd think it was Seattle or L.A. at
5pm on Friday, the way they describe it ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 - 03:20 am:

Going north on our trip to Seattle we ran into a major accident on I-5, a truck apparently caught fire and the traffic was mostly stopped. This was on a steep grade, so there were 3 lanes. We were driving along (in the fast lane) when all of a sudden everyone was stopping and the truck next to me was trying to push us off the bank, Then I see an Oregon State Trooper standing next to his car in the slow lane with light flashing, not doing anything. WHY wasn't he at the bottom of the hill slowing folks down instead of watching a new accident happen?
Went past another accident on a two-lane road, Fire Trucks around, in the middle of the road and over the line, CHP cars around, and no one watching the traffic, we were basically policing ourselves, everyone taking turns getting around the mess. If one fire truck had only pulled 4 feet to one side, there would have been plenty of room for 2-way traffic around the mess.
You'd think these guys would have had some training in traffic control and basic road safety.
OK Rant over!!
Brass guy, thanks for the work around, I'll have to make note of it (although usually we are stopping in the south part of Seattle and not driving through). So what do you do if you're already in town & want to go north?
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walt Berdan, Bellevue, WA on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 - 08:09 pm:

David - Pack patience.

I agree with all Brass Car Guy said. I live near Seattle but avoid driving through Seattle and Tacoma almost any way I can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Tuesday, September 08, 2015 - 11:57 pm:

I would have posted an update last night, but our roadside motel had wonky wifi and it just wasn't worth the effort.

Anyway, Monday was another great day on the road. We made the 472 miles from Silverton OR to Kettle Falls WA in just over 13 hours including fuel, food and pee stops. Our new halogen driving light was just the ticket for the last hour of driving as darkness fell and the deer were roaming.

The car was, once again, flawless.

Today? Not so much…



Early Monday morning fog just north of Silverton.



We chanced upon this group of six Model As and two moderns in White Salmon WA along the Columbia River. They are members of the Silicon Valley Model A Restorers Club on a month-long 4,000 mile ramble from the Bay Area up to Glacier Park MT, Yellowstone Park WY and more.



Nice vintage Ford sign in Odessa WA.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 - 12:57 am:

Soon after we left Kettle Falls this morning, there was an ominous knocking at the transition between throttle-on and coasting. Fearing the worst, we limped into Northport WA just eight miles shy of the Canadian border, had breakfast, and found a sheltered spot to work on the car out of the rain.

Sure enough, shorting out each plug with a screwdriver isolated the problem to the #4 cylinder, and dropping the inspection cover revealed copious babbitt in the troughs and 1/32"-ish vertical play in the rod.

Crap.

As the cover was coming off, local old guy Bill drove by and stopped to see what we were all about. Turns out he does some leatherwork and — since none of us had any bacon rind — offered to go home and get some leather scraps and a shaving tool to make an insert.

The journal was still OK with some circumferential marks, but nothing one could catch a fingernail on. The cap seemed basically OK, with a bit of the edge babbit broken out and some discolouration, but still smooth to the touch.

Bill carved us an insert for the top half, I buttoned it up and all went well for the next 24 miles. The knock returned, faintly, so we dropped the pan once more and took the con rod bolts up a ways. There was still about 1/32" gap between the cap and rod, and we expected to take it up again once or twice as the leather compressed. Fortunately, the rod bolts have self-locking nuts, so there was no monkeying around with cotter pin holes being at the wrong heights.

More knocking again 60 miles later, this time louder and all of a sudden. Turns out the first insert had disintegrated, with part remaining in the top, part migrating to the cap and the rest who knows where. Worse, the cap babbitt was now compromised although the journal remained OK.

We redesigned the leather insert using a different, smoother material, and made one for the cap as well. This one included a relief for the dipper hole.

We then dawdled along at 30-35 mph for the 20 miles to the next town with a restaurant and motel (New Denver, BC) and were very happy to get out of the rain for a few hours.

Tomorrow we plan to drop the cover first thing and give the rod a pre-emptive tightening before it gets noisy. With luck, moderate speeds, and another few twists on the nuts we might be able to make it the 500 miles home without further grief.

There is a precedent for my optimism — 20 years ago this week my late Dad and I were in the Rockies in this same car when we lost the #1 rod bearing climbing up to Lake Louise. We put in a leather insert by the roadside, re-tightened it soon after, and not only made it 400 miles home the long way, but I ran that leather bearing another year and a half before getting the rod re-babbitted.

There's still hope!



Is it still a "shade tree" repair if one is sheltering from the rain and not the sun?



Babbitt bits from the troughs, and the #4 cap while it was still OK.



The journal was still OK, not so much the rod.



"Leatherman" Bill



First retightening of the first leather at 24 miles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 - 01:36 am:

Imagine the joy of doing this along I-5, .... in a pouring rain, about 38Ί, with a gaping head wound ....

Northport is a great place to break down. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 - 01:47 am:

A long road trip in a T is always an adventure.. Knock on leather you'll get all the way home - at reduced speed :-)

Still prefer this years adventure compared to last years loss of brakes going down a steep hill.. (wood bands are good for low and reverse, not so much as a service brake..)

(Message edited by Roger K on September 09, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Wednesday, September 09, 2015 - 11:39 pm:

Wednesday update: New Denver BC to Golden BC, 193 miles at 30-32 mph. There are now 207 miles on the second leather rod bearing and it seems fine — we tightened the rod nuts a half turn at 120 miles just on general principles but there has been no detectable knocking.

We are still 330 miles from home. Our plan is to set out early at 35 mph and probably bump it up to 40 mph when we get within my auto club 100-mile free towing radius from Edmonton.



First in line at the Galena Bay-Shelter Bay ferry after missing the previous sailing by three minutes, AKA "The Model T Ford: Returning oil to the ground for over 100 years!"



Always fun to see one's car from another angle (and that oil patch below the axle is NOT from this car.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 11:11 am:

This has been an extremely interesting read for sure! Thanks Chris for starting this thread and also for the "blow-by-blow" detailed accounting of your experience with the "emergency leather rod bearing"! My Dad spoke of such a repair when as a kid, he and his parents and family had a similar experience driving a Model T from Forest Grove, Oregon, back to Fergus Falls, Minnesota in 1927. I knew such a repair with leather was a way to get home (or to the next town) for permanent repairs, but I had no idea it was possible to drive the distance you guys did with a leather rod bearing! What a great Model T "experience", even if it did require "slow going" and a lot of attention to make it home! And thanks for the detailed description of how you guys did it,........harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 11:16 am:

Oh, and I forgot to say,.....great pictures too!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 11:37 am:

Thanks for this thread. One of the stories my grandpa told was from the depression era was, Grandpa, Grandma, and my Mom at 2 months old, headed to California from the dust bowl of Oklahoma. They had 62.00 cash and everything they owned in a 1925 4 door. Grandpa had worked for weeks getting the car ready. During the trip they wore out the bands and used leather belts for band material. But as they got to the California border one of the rods finally gave up. There was no more adjustment and the babitt was gone. So Grandpa used what was left of his leather belt to fit a bearing. They drove the last of the trip into Bakersfield on the leather bearing and leather low band. The brake band was worn out, so Grandpa found the largest log him and grandma could pick up. He used two fence posts wired to the back of the car for a rack for the log to lay on. When they got to a hill that grandpa thought was too steep for no brakes, him and grandma would roll the log off the back of the car. With it attached to the car with a chain, they would drag it to the bottom of the hill, and then get out and put it back on the rack, and drive to the next steep hill and do it all over again. Their stories of all the trips they made thru the years up and down old Route 66 is what got me interested in the model Ts ... Nice pictures and a great adventure ... Donnie Brown ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 12:30 pm:

Very interesting!
I got interested in T's in the late 50's listening to my soon to be father-in-law talk about T's when he was a kid.
He said he used leather a few times but never for as many miles as you, Chris.
Congrats on a job well done!
I'm going to keep a chunk of leather in my car from now on.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 12:33 pm:

Thanks for telling your story and how durable a T can be!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 03:03 pm:

I have never doubted any of Grandpas stories about their trips, but Chris's trip and their story just re-enforces Grandpas old stories. One thing I try to remember about Grandpa, Grandmas and my Moms trip is that it was gravel road all the way from Okla to California. With the exception of brick streets in the towns, there was no hard surface roads. Then the heavy 4 door, loaded to the max, makes you wonder how they made it. I was with them one time and we were driving the old two lane somewhere in the middle of Arizona, There was a stretch of road that had a hill in it. From the bottom of the hill to the top of the hill was about four miles. Grandpa pointed out that the old gravel section of route 66 had been straightened out and went straight up the hill as the two lane black top. We could see where the old gravel road went up the hill as a series of "switchbacks" we counted the gravel "switchbacks" crossing the two lane 11 times from the bottom to the top of the hill. We estimated the gravel section that had been replaced by the 4 miles of two lane was 52 miles long. It took them 10 days to make the trip in the 20s. They were the lucky ones, because they already had family in California, and they had a job waiting for them when they got there. They worked the fruit harvest for most of their lives, and traveled Route 66 from the 1920s till the mid 1980s. The trip was at least once a year. They saw the old road go from gravel to two lane till I40 replaced it, and drove I-40 some during the later years. But Grandpa even drove old Route 66 as much as he could because he hated the high speed "idiots" on I-40. Chris, try not to push it too much as you get closer to home. It will be a lot nicer story if you make it all the way home without a tow truck ... :-) be safe, Donnie Brown


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 04:27 pm:

Thanks all for your encouragement and especially Donnie for the great stories. I've been reading them to Jerry as he drives.

Interesting juxtaposition of technologies here as I attempt to post to the World Wide Web from an iPhone 5 whilst riding in a Model T Ford and relying on a makeshift leather bearing to get us home.

Home is now 135 miles away, we are cruising at 35 mpg and that remarkable leather bearing is still going strong at 404 miles.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 06:08 pm:

If you make it home without a tow, I wonder how long that miracle leather bearing will stay in the engine!

Remember, there is nothing more permanent than a temporary fix that works!

Best of luck to you both on the remainder of the trip! :-)

red


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 09:13 pm:

HAHAHA Mark you are so right -- that saying is going up on the workshop wall.

Latest update: bearing is still behaving but 50 miles out there was a BANG and I watched the right front tire roll into the ditch. The rim had split about 6" along the outside clincher and it was bye bye tire. We were on a deserted gravel road so no traffic and no particular drama. That's the first flat or worse in over two years.

Jerry is back in the saddle and we are motoring north at 36 mph.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Todd, ............Red Deer, Alberta on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 09:44 pm:

Chris, just found this thread and read about your troubles. If you're near Red Deer and need any assistance give me a call, but I suspect that you're probably going north on t'other side of the mountains, heading for #16.
fourohthreethreeonefourninefourzerofour
Problem right now is that my trailer is out of service, I'm replacing the rotted out deck. Although it would probably be possible to put a T on it w/out a deck. The cross channels are 24" apart.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Thursday, September 10, 2015 - 10:33 pm:

Chris, The leather bearing may be a blessing in disguise. How fast do you usually travel with good bearings .??? The split rim/tire coming off, may have been a bigger issue at full speed. Keep on plugging along and arrive home safe. Donnie Brown ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 08:24 am:

We got home safe and sound by dark with no further trouble. Total trip was 2,568 fun-filled miles over 10 days.

The leather bearing has now served for 581 miles and I am thinking about tightening the nuts a bit further then running it as is until the car gets laid up for other work. We'll see.

Thanks again to all the posters for your kind words, suggestions, comments and stories. Much appreciated!



Sixth vehicle passed in 2,500 miles.



If one is going to lose a tire, this is the road to be on.



We often hear that split rims are dangerous...



A Model T Ford losing a tire on a Model T road at Model T speeds deserves a Model T jack for the repair!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 08:57 am:

It's great you got all the way home :-)
How bad was the rim that gave in?
Maybe it's time to inspect all the rims..?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 09:01 am:

Glad to hear you made it!

Keep us posted on the service you get from that leather rod bearing! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 10:24 am:

Very interesting thread Chris! My 26 engine in the 22 had about 1/4 of the rear block side of the Babbitt not filled out with Babbitt to machine so no full contact with the crank. I decided to run it until some thing gave away as it was never ran before a re babbitt. That was about six thousand miles past and I usually drive 45 to 50 MPH. The 26 is a Canadian engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 05:44 pm:

"Thanks again to all the posters for your kind words, suggestions, comments and stories. Much appreciated!"
Our stories!? You're the one with stories to tell!

I have often thought about a clincher rim breaking that way, but have never had or seen one do it. Having run two or three part split rims and dealing with their well known safety issues makes me think about such things. The funny thing is, that I have had two modern drop-center rims split apart in a similar way while driving. That was also an interesting experience.

I am so glad you got it home! And with even more stories to tell for years to come.
Drive carefully, and do enjoy! W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 07:23 pm:

We've all heard stories about folks "back in the day" using leather for rod bearings in a pinch, many of them headed to Californy during the 30's. But I've never heard about anyone doing it during my lifetime -- until now.

The fact that you've got over 500 miles on it and it's still working is quite a testament to the viability of that fix. Looks like I'm going to need to add a leather belt to my tool box. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tony Bowker, Ramona, CA on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 12:55 am:

On one of the early Catalina Island tours there were stories of using a leather belt for a connecting rod bearing. Now I might even believe it....
Great story and a wonderful trip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 03:25 pm:

How thick did you make the leather insert?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Carnegie Spokane, WA on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 03:55 pm:

Not to hi-jack the thread, but here is the earliest printed version of the "Bacon Rind" story that I have seen.

http://www.antiqueautoranch.com/montana500/may2002newsletter/may2002.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 08:27 pm:

Thanks for that link Tom, great reading!

Roger, the leather we used measures about 0.040". I neglected to take a photo of the leather pads before they went into the rod, but have mocked-up basically what we used in the photo below. These leather bits are now in the tool box for next time.

The upper and lower pads are both just a little narrower than the babbitt, and neither extends quite up to the rod/cap joint.

The cap babbitt was a little rough but basically all there so we used just one layer of leather. This leather was notched at the dipper hole.

A lot of the upper/rod babbitt had gone away, so we used a second, partial, pad at the top as shown. This second pad was quick-epoxied to the main one just to keep things in place during assembly.

I've decided to run the leather until it fails or we are getting ready for another long run. This time I won't baby it with low speeds, so it may or may not last very long. I dropped the cover this afternoon and took up the rod nuts almost a half turn, just because it seemed like a reasonable thing to do. Mileage on this leather bearing is now 586.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Bamford, Edmonton AB on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 08:30 pm:

Forgot to mention... after giving the rod nuts a half turn today there is still a gap between rod and cap of maybe 0.030". The shims were discarded when the leather went in.


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