What spares do you carry in your T for emergency parts?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What spares do you carry in your T for emergency parts?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Buckley on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 06:33 pm:

I'm going to put together a emergency roadside kit for my Fordor. I wanted to get ideas what others have. Some basics : Duct tape, electrical tape, adjustable wrenches, flashlight, extra oil and water, tow rope, some type of baling wire, Etc. Any helpful suggestions welcomed. Thanks


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 06:50 pm:

Cell phone and AAA number!

It ain't 1965 and I'm not 20 any more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 07:04 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/228352.html?1313207000

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/166729.html?1287762118

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/6/1665.html

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/80257/95702.html?1245267830

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/262953.html?1327783985


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Manlove on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 07:37 pm:

Spark plugs, extra timer, fan belt, tire patches, assorted tools to change the above items


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 07:47 pm:

Don, Exactly.
Failing the use of that stuff, then call AAA.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Gruber- Spanaway, Wash. on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 08:42 pm:

After hearing of Chris Bamford's experiences in the last ten days...we all need to add a leather belt to our emergency kits.
(Babbitt replacement)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 09:06 pm:

I almost put this onto Chris Bamford's thread. The one and only time I ever carried a spare connecting rod on a major (or any) tour? Was the one and only time I ever threw a connecting rod bearing on a tour. Changed it in the hotel parking lot that evening.
Moral of the story? Don't carry a spare rod.
I always figure that the belt on my waist would be sacrificial if needed. But carrying a little leather might be a good idea if you really need your belt.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 09:50 pm:

I carry oil, distilled water and also a spare coil and timer just because I already have them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 10:38 pm:

Coil, timer, spark plug, carburetor head gasket, cotter pins tools.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, September 11, 2015 - 11:46 pm:

All good suggestions - I'm just adding a classic: bailing wire :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 12:57 am:

I used to carry bailing wire in my A as a joke, then one day, while in Redding (a full hour's drive (more in an A) from Dunsmuir, the muffler fell off. Bailing wire saved the day! No more joke & always kept some with me after that!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Barker - Dayton, OH on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 04:43 am:

Spare parts: Spark plugs, coil, set of points, condenser, rotor, 25A fuses
Tools: Assorted wrenches, screwdriver, pliers, vice grips, 6" drift, jack, hammer, LED work light.
Repair materials: Duct tape, safety wire, tow strap, tarp, bungee cords, work gloves, roll of paper towels, rags.

I fit all of that into my four speedster storage compartments:

One under each seat




The trunk behind the driver's seat, and the fuel tank compartment



If all else fails, I have AAA Plus and Hagerty Plus if necessary. Good for 100 miles of towing on a flat bed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 08:16 am:

My family and I often strike out in our T for long weekends by ourselves, unaccompanied by other club members. Living in West Virginia, there are no "easy" roads. You're either going up, or you're going down... sometimes at very steep angles. In any event, since we will travel a few hundred miles in a weekend, I make sure I am prepared. Because out here, sometimes it can take hours for AAA to get to you. So here's what I carry at all times in my completely stock, un-restored, early 1915 Touring car.

SPARE PARTS:
Timer
coil
Holley G carburetor
fresh brake band
one inner front wheel bearing
one each, outer front wheel bearings
belt
complete gasket set (including copper head gasket and manifold glands)
one foot rubber fuel line
spark plugs
length of raw spark plug wire
15 feet of 14 ga. wire
Rear brake shoe springs
one Connecting Rod
assortment of fine thread ford bolts, nuts and cotter pins
30x3 tube
30x3.5 tube
magneto head light bulbs
axle shaft

CONSUMABLES:
Small can of wheel bearing grease
4 Qts oil
WD-40
Spray Carburetor cleaner
Mechanical wire
roll of black electrical tape
3 gallons of water (in a moonshine can on the running board)
inner tube patch kit
several rags

STANDARD HAND TOOLS:
wrenchs through 1"
adjustable wrench through 1.125"
1/2" drive sockets through 1"
hammer
punch
chisel
brass drift
pliers
channel locks
vice-grips
wire cutters
needle nose pliers
screw drivers

SPECIALTY TOOLS (FORD TOOLS, ETC.)
band wrench
band nut tool
band strap
Two different T-handles for pulling bands
rear wheel hub puller
Ford exhaust manifold packing nut wrench
old magnetic trouble light
flash light
fire extinguisher
modern bicycle tire hand pump

And lets not forget the side curtains!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary H. White - Sheridan, MI on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 04:52 pm:

Add: Credit/Debit card, First Aid kit, hand cleaner, big leather belt (multiple uses).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Buckley on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 06:11 pm:

You all have some good items and ideas, I hadn't thought of, that's what I was looking for with this thread. Regarding the AAA Plus and cell phone, "wouldn't leave home without it"! As a. matter of fact, my modern 2011 Ford Taurus's, transmission broke on me Again, a couple of weeks ago. First time was at about,3000 miles, this time 48,500 miles. I was lucky, as I was still in town, and had cell service, ( I don't get cell service from home), it took 2 1/2 hours for AAA, as it was around 5 PM, on a Friday evening. Luckily, I didn't have to pay for repairs, as it has a 6 year, 60,000 power train warranty. That was the only good thing, that came out of it. Thanks for all the good information!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 06:56 pm:

James - Where does it all go?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 07:04 pm:

Dan

I was thinking the same thing.
There is barely enough room for me, passengers, and some drinking water in my T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 07:26 pm:

I keep my stuff in my running board tool box. One item of interest - when I first got my 1924 cut-off pickup, I bought an "incorrect" double barrel tire pump for it, which fit in the tool box. Later, when I learned more, I traded the double barrel for a "correct" single barrel Ford pump.

Trouble is, the "correct" pump is too tall to fit in my running board tool box. Progress?? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 07:31 pm:

the most important thing James said is a fire extinguisher. I had one once and it saved my truck when a gas line broke. but I dont carry one now. I think that I will pickup a couple our t has a running board tool box that is a perfect spot


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 09:30 pm:

Dan and Fred...

Coil, inner tubes, trouble light, carburetor and two quarts of oil go under the front seat along each side of the gas tank. The brake band is in a long nylon cloth tube and stretched around the gas tank, just kind of gripping it from friction.

The complete gasket set, including copper head gasket goes under the cocoa mat where it slopes upward under the front seat.

I have a wooden tool box that is about a hundred years old bolted on the drivers side running board. The WD-40 and carb sprays go in there along with two quarts of oil, mechanics wire, and the most common tools I need to reach for routinely.

Everything else goes under the rear seat, neatly packaged with no space left unused. IT's amazing how much stuff you can pack in those T's if you pack it like you're packing a moving van.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 12:25 pm:

I'm with Fred Dimock. AAA Plus is good too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 01:02 pm:

Never really go more then 140 miles round trip but;
Oil
Fuse
Extra band
Set of tools
Coil
Fire extinguisher
Wheel chocks
Plus the one thing no one has suggested;
Extra gas :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 01:26 pm:

You want to carry grease, but the regular size takes up too much space.

The smallest can I could find with a lid was Frito bean dip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 02:18 pm:

I see a number of head gaskets listed, but no torque wrench. I carry an old beam style torque wrench. I've changed a head gasket on a tour while waiting for the trouble truck to help someone else...


Timer, plug, one band already lined, oil, one coil, water, couple of hose clamps, bailing wire, electrical wire, electrical tape, steel and plastic zip ties, tool bag, inner tube, tire irons and patch kit, cotter pins, spare battery for ignition (I use small sealed batteries). Tube of RTV, small thing of grease. Exhaust packing wrench, band wrench. Bag with assorted nuts, bolts and washers including a band washer. Rings and glands. Spare ignition key. I used to carry a spare carburetor, but since I've swapped to the Stromberg OF. I have not. If I go on a long tour I carry one in the truck and can change it at the hotel. I'll also take a spare rod on a long tour. Once I get my running board tool boxes installed I'll re-evaluate.

Wheel check

AAA+


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 03:08 pm:

Don't need a torque wrench, the spark plug/head bolt wrench give enough torque to do the job, which is all I use anyway.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 05:08 pm:

The torque wrench isn't for wrench size, is so you can install the head and torque the gasket properly. I've changed a head gasket on the side of the road before, and run a few hundred miles finishing the tour after. I wouldn't install a head at home without one, don't see why I would on the side of the road either.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 11:37 pm:

Gary that is what that wrench is for, it gives the proper torque for the standard bolts used to hold the head on. Try using it some time and you will understand.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By VRayFoster on Monday, September 14, 2015 - 06:34 pm:

If you are using anything non standard, carry spares for that. No one else will be likely to have them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By WilliamThomas Forsythe on Monday, September 14, 2015 - 09:19 pm:

Since 2002,I have carried, the regular list of items covered by most members. I drive a Canadian 1912 Touring with the front foredoors and use my driver's door most of the time.Fortunately our Canadian cars are equipped with but one size of tire, front and rear- 30 x 3-1/2 on the early T's. As a result we only need to carry one spare. I managed to securely mount a new spare tire beneath the car! For those of us who don't want to mount a spare on the running board, and don't have spare tire carriers as on the later T's, this is a very viable option. First I wrapped it nicely in a heavy duty polyethylene garbage bag,(in a similar fashion to the manufacturer's wrapping),secured with a good quality duct tape, to prevent any oil that may leak from the pan, from attacking the rubber.
The tire rests on rod of the front tie between the two supports of the running boards.The front edge of the tire is against the lower surface of the pan,just foreword of the ball cap. The rest of the tire pushes up against the driveshaft and the rear radius rods.It is held up in this position by a support bracket- attached to the driveshaft,with a U bolt and clamped around the tire with a 3 inch wide flat,hinged,metal band closed with two 5/16" machine bolts.Although I have had two flats, during 23,000 miles of driving the T, my new spare tube kept under the rear seat, is all I've needed to date.My small 12 volt air compressor was obviously useful as well.Just the same, it is indeed very assuring to know that should we one day blow a tire,we need not search far for a replacement. Sorry,I tried to forward a photo, but without success! Tom Forsythe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By WilliamThomas Forsythe on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 09:22 am:

Trying again with a photo. If you look closely under the car you can just see the spare!
Tom Forsythea stop for afternoon tea


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By jeff cordes on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 09:54 am:

I was with some guys and we changed an axle shaft in the middle of the road out in west texas. There were only a few cars that went by during those 3 hours for the repair. There was an elderly lady in one of those cars and she pulled up and said " bet you broke an axle, I saw you boys playing up on that mountain." We all looked at each other and had a good laugh. So yes I carry an axle and the stuff to put it in.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 01:12 pm:

J.B.Weld!:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robb Wolff on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 02:10 pm:

A couple of years ago on a camping tour one of the Ts developed a wheel bearing problem. The car owner had a spare and the problem was easily fixed, but packing the bearing was a bit messy.

After that experience I decided to store spare bearings already lubed. The plastic box I used was a container for the fence and deck screws we used building our fence. The kit contains: left and right outer bearings and one outer cup, one inner bearing, cup and seal, left and right spindle nuts, a thrust washer, cotter keys, paper towel for clean up, a Ziploc for the bearings and nitrile gloves.

When everything is packed in the box there is still room for a couple of spark pugs and some JB Weld.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Benedict, Humboldt, TN on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 03:38 pm:

What about a volt/amp meter? I've loaned my meter out twice so far on tours. Haven't needed it myself yet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 03:54 pm:

I carry most of the stuff mentioned but I also carry a few candy bars and a couple of bottles of water and a blanket. If I get stranded I at least can eat a candy bar, drink water and keep warm.


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