Consumables

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Consumables
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 02:08 pm:

With half or more of the T folks using there lunch money for T parts or T tools it does not make logic to buy new parts or tools.
My bride and I with me on SS do probably twenty or thirty yard or garage sales a week end. You would be amazed at what folks give away. 3000 pound NEW power washer for 25.00 the owner could not start. A 5500 watt continues duty generator the owner did not read instructions if it got low on oil for 25.00 Young folks can not fix anything unless its done by pushing a PC button. Older folks with money just sell it for more room in the garage and buy a new one.
Went to one G sale this past weekend got 12 quarts of new NAPA automatic transmission fluid for 10.00 and an 18 volt drill with 2 batteries and charger for 5.00 Just finished painting my shop and home with good paint with no pigment 17 five gallon buckets pigmented to a color my bride likes free at Home Depot. Paint was 100.00 from a painter leaving town. With tractors, lawn mowers, kids cars, and T stuff I am not to proud to buy at a G sale.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 02:18 pm:

Agreed. I've bought expensive stuff cheap that way. Estate sales and farm auctions are almost as good.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Whelihan Danbury, WI on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 03:06 pm:

I'll do you one better. Around here we have a town dump and recycling center. Lots of the big city folks who have cabins around here (and lots more money than mechanical aptitude), throw away all kinds of great useable stuff. I've picked up outboards and lawn mowers that only needed a new spark plug or two, an electric trolling motor, gas space heaters for deer camp, metal racks, grills, and wood stoves just to name a few. And best of all: FREE! The haul of treasure is only limited by the space in my garage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 03:17 pm:

The word Recycle is really common nowadays.
But the words that more folks should be learning are, Reuse,rebuild,repair. Our dumps would last longer,more money in the pocket,and the feeling of success of repairing something or making it something else.
To be completely honest I learned it from my dad. Don't throw away much as far as metal in useable lengths and such.
If you need it,build it. If you want something expensive,buy 1 broken cheap you can fix.
I have wanted a Mantis tiller for years. It took me a while and 3 machines to make 1. But I love it for my raised beds and I think it was 20 bucks worth of parts.Plus my aunt paid me the cost of a machine I bought at the scrap yard so I would swap tines with hers,which I had a good set already from another 1.
I could go on for days.But the truth is,I know people that millionaires that do same as I do. They were raised in hard times and it is just in their nature.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Waddell sr. on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 03:53 pm:

My old mans mantra.. Use it up, make it do, or do without. Works for me. That's why I drive old cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 05:05 pm:

I know at least one dump in Idaho the folks call it the town Wal- Mart. I have at least three Mantis tillers and have given kids that many more. Just picked up a four cycle that's not as picky as the Mantis but heavier. My 55 year friend was the master at sales he passed a few weeks ago. He said always check the free box. He had crab totes in front of his shop loading them with stainless copper and aluminum pans from the free box. Once a year they were sold for scrap. Two of my cars get forty MPG. one has 225K the other 36K both are over fifteen years old. Toyotas are good cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By paul iverson freeport ill. on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 05:36 pm:

about 10 years ago when I lived near chicago I got a 2 day a week job with 1-800 got junk just for the good stuff,I dident care about the pay check. its hard to believe what people pay to have hauled away.its kind of sad when a lady pays to get rid of her dead husbands tools and treasures even family pictures


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 05:45 pm:

Sadly here in our area if it goes to the dump or refuse center it stays, you cannot pick it up or try to re-cycle it. They band is bale it and send it off NOW MATTER what it is. My older son just retired and he said there many time he would like to have had some of the stuff that went thru there land fill area. GGGGOOOOOOD STUUUUFFFF!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 08:45 pm:

I had a friend that volunteered at the local transfer station on Saturdays just so he could pick the stuff that people threw away.
He had 3-4 snow blowers, a couple roto tillers, electric cars for the kids, and all kinds of climbing toys,
One day the town fathers - in their great wisdom- said the the employees and volunteers could not take anything home.
Saturday at the transfer station quickly came to an end because they could not get help.

Our stingy officials at work!
To,use the words of you know who "They are Stupid!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 09:08 pm:

I was born in 1961 and grew up with a fascination/attraction to old stuff and old people.
Do the math .... the people who had lived through the Depression. Their attitude soaked
into me deep, but in the same breath, I hold a lot of contempt for cheapskates. There IS
a difference !

But back to the happy side of being frugal .... it was those barns and farm sheds full of
everything it took to keep anything going, and in that mix were things like old TT trucks,
just waiting for the next crank up to bring in another harvest. The furrowed brow of Farmer
Brown as he beat some red hot metal into shape for some repair influenced me away from
my 1970's peers who were all being groomed to be part of the throw-away culture. I was
a weirdo amongst my own friends, but I never cared. I preferred being out in the fields or
forests, barns and corrals to playing Atari games or drinking. A beer tasted 1000 times
better with leather gloves on and a shovel in the other hand.

Call me crazy. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Saturday, September 12, 2015 - 09:09 pm:

The high thinking of our waste management sends the garbage from Astoria, Warrenton, and surrounding areas inland over the mountains south of Portland about a hundred miles from here. If nothing else it probably keeps fifty good paying jobs. Funny there is much more area for a sanitary landfill close to home. Portland land fill mixes different colors of latex paint and sells it cheap. Only one color but who cares on an out building.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

The ultimate environmentalism is to not throw something usable away. I have yet to find a small gas engined piece of equipment that would turn over that I couldn't get running cheap. I bought my first new power lawnmower when we had been married for 38 years. The lawnmower that I had used for the past ten years was one that my next door neighbor threw away because the engine was no good. I removed and cleaned the carburetor, and for the next decade the total maintenance was to sharpen the blade and change the oil every couple of years. The deck finally rotted to the point that I couldn't find anything strong enough to weld a patch to:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 12:56 pm:

Your right John! As long as there is compression you usually can make them run easy.

With about ninety thousand square feet of lawn bordered by swamp it takes more time then I like to keep it away from my home and shop when every thing grows so fast.

My 42 inch Sears probably made by MTD has run for years free because the former owner knocked the plastic oil drain off and ruined the engine. At another sale the owner took the deck off after buying a new mower for his kids to play with It took about two hours to swap the good engine. Both mowers were free and that mower is used now.
I like your personal quote!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 01:01 pm:

I go to estate sales looking for stuff that can't be bought new any more. Recently I got 10 rolls of various grades of solder, including acid core, flux core, and even some silver solder from an estate where the guy was some sort of tinkerer. It was about ten pounds, all for $1.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 03:06 pm:

NINETY-THOUSAND SQUARE FEET OF LAWN .... WOW !

I think I have about NINETY square feet of the stuff. I use a 1915 vintage reel type
push mower that I got from a farm liquidator for the whopping sum of five dollars.
If it was ever used before I got it, there was no indication. The red and gold paint
was patinaed, but was hardly blemished. When I asked "How much?", he said
"Nobody wants a push mower anymore. How about five bucks ?" I didn't even
try to dicker. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 03:30 pm:

Back in the '60's when we bought our first house and had very little to furnish it, I lucked out on a power motor. On the annual "trash day" when you could throw out about anything and the village would pick it up, the day before, a neighbor threw out a power mower that had a bad engine. About a block away, another neighbor threw out an identical mower that looked like it had been run over by a car because the cast aluminum base was badly broken. By waiting until after dark to avoid any embarrassment, I "acquired both mowers and combined them to make a dandy little mower that I used for several years. Had a can of some kind of ugly green paint to paint the good base of the mower with in hopes that neither of the neighbors would recognize "my new lawn mower"! (If they ever did, they never said anything!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 03:53 pm:

Some times I do not like the square foot of lawn but most of the time its a blessing. Dead end street elk deer ducks geese and some critters I do not like right out my front or back door. My critters warn me if a car comes down the drive way and no curtains on the windows.
I was told after moving here that I would soon hate going to Portland --- They were right! Nice to have very low blood pleasure.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 10:09 pm:

Cut that lawn with a push mower and not only will your blood pressure be at a
healthy level, but you can give up that gym membership and save all that dough
too ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Vitko on Sunday, September 13, 2015 - 11:42 pm:

LOL! After a mild stroke its a continues argument with doctors wanting me to vegetate setting on a chair doing nothing. If they knew I was two steps up a ladder or crawling under a T it would be another test for some thing. As is I feel good and do better moving the amount I do.
I think being happy and home is the key even if it takes an hour on the rider mowing the lawn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, September 14, 2015 - 02:20 am:

I hear you. My 86-year-old mentor is in terminal decline, but seems to perk
up noticeably when I come to visit. We had an oldtime road trip planned for
last month, but the family overruled on the basis of safety. I suggested that
if I can lead a team of men around Afghanistan, I think I can handle any
emergent situation that might develop and that it might do him some good
just to get out there.

But I weigh in as just a long time friend, and family overrules. So, he'll just
sit in a chair with the curtains drawn and wait for the end to come.

I hate this getting old stuff. :-P


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