Little Model T Tricks and Tips

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Little Model T Tricks and Tips
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Monday, September 14, 2015 - 05:01 pm:

I just added a little video to Steve's "What did you do today?" thread. On thinking about it I wanted a whole new thread where everyone can post little tricks they have thought of to make Model T use and maintenance easier and more enjoyable.

My trick makes adding oil a bit easier in the cramped Model T engine compartment.

Just click the following link and turn up the volume ... sorry about the loud hood ... when you are done watching, or just plain tired of it hit your return button to get back to this thread.

The Amazing Oil Bottle Funnel

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Monday, September 14, 2015 - 05:33 pm:

Terry, it is a great tip. I have several "bottle funnels" around as I never can seem to find one when I need it, LOL. But I never thought to put it on top of another qt of oil for safe keeping. Good Tip.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Weeds on Monday, September 14, 2015 - 05:35 pm:

This thread should be a great read Terry and I'm looking forward to all the tips.
Great oil filler idea.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 12:16 am:

Terry thanks it's nice seeing rusty again hadn't seen him since you came over the hill to buy him


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 03:05 am:

Terry, that is a cool idea. I used to do the same thing years ago, but I haven't seen an oil jug made that way for years. I think they quit making the long spout to save room in their warehouses, at least around here. The jugs that I have seen here have no spout and a large hole to pour out of. Makes it very hard to pour into an engine without spilling without a funnel. JMHO.Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 10:59 am:

Not sure if this "a tip" or not, but maybe just what I consider a good habit. I always push both "rabbit ears" (hand throttle lever and spark advance lever) all the way up as far as they will go, every time I shut the engine off. I admit that I like the sound of the exhaust at full spark retard and engine idle for a few seconds, but leaving the car in that condition when shutting down helps to preclude the likelihood of a possible "senior moment" problem when next starting the engine by either hand cranking (possible injury) or electric stater (possible starter/bendix) damage).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 11:23 am:

I've used a cut-off bottle like that before, but I never thought of sticking it on a full bottle. Excellent.

PS
Speak up, Terry, I can't hear you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 02:34 pm:

Almost rear-ending a loaded hearse because my shoelaces somehow got looped over the brake pedal was a bad thing.



Now I tuck my shoelaces in my shoes so that won't happen.



No, it wasn't really a loaded hearse I almost rear-ended; it was just a regular car. _But hey, that's not good either. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 03:03 pm:

When teaching a grandchild how to drive a "T" make sure no one has tried to teach them on a stick shift. My granddaughter had a very hard time wrapping her head around the fact that when you push the "Clutch" all the way in the car moved forward! (She is doing much better now):-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 08:45 pm:

My best tip is to tell people to not eat yellow snow.

Unless it is a lemon snow cone.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joe Fedullo, Milford MI on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 09:36 pm:

Bill Elliot taught me one at Old Car fest. For those of us with carbide generators, put a plastic bag in between the screen and the bucket to catch the mess that drips down. When you are done, just take the plastic bag out and the mess is cleaned up.

A different T guy told me to epoxy a thimble on the bottom of my gas cap under the hole (small hole in thimble) to act as a baffle and prevent gas splashing out on turns. I added two washers within the thimble to further baffle things and have never dripped a drop of gas since.

-Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay's a suburb!) on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 10:01 pm:

-G.R.- Saw this on PowerNation, but it ties in to what you were saying. (My daughters had to learn the manual shift before being allowed to move on.)

Trying to steal a car, but can't drive a stick shift!
http://www.powernationtv.com/post/teens-try-to-steal-car-get-hung-up-on-stick-sh ift


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay's a suburb!) on Tuesday, September 15, 2015 - 10:44 pm:

-Terry & others-
Neat trick for an old bottle, and to carry it in the emergency box! I've used a device for years, but can't recall where I found it. Probably a K-Mart, Wal-Mart, etc. It screws onto a quart bottle, and the quart cap will in turn fit the device for storage. Made of plastic, but a 'butterfly valve' seals everything off until opened up. Also efficient and no mess, besides matching my bottles of Pennzoil.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dick Lodge - St Louis MO on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 08:58 am:

Not sure it qualifies, but the story of the teens and the stick shift made me think of it. I know T guys who park their cars and leave the keys in the ignition. When it's pointed out to them, they shrug and say, "No one can drive it, so they can't steal it." My answer to that is, "They may not be able to steal the car, but they can still steal the key."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Schmidt ..... Seattle on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 05:23 pm:

Mike McGinnis gave me a tip. After unloading car from trailer, if there is something you must do before driving tow vehicle and trailer, he ties a piece of cloth to the steering wheel.
This reminds him when he jumps in that he must check trailer.
Secure ramps, lock door or remember to load wife and dog before heading out.
Now if I can only remember why I tied my hanky to the wheel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 11:30 am:

Here's the oil filler accessory I run on our 15 Roadster Pickup. It works great!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Coiro on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 05:31 pm:

As for the teens who couldn't steal a car because they couldn't drive a stick-shift: Everybody seems to be laughing about the situation, including the victim. _The news anchors treated this like it was a human-interest story. _Folks, let's not forget that these thieves stuck a GUN in the face of that nice old lady. _Let's not forget they threatened her life. _I sure do hope that when they're caught, the judge throws the book at them.

Okay, I'll get off my soapbox now.

Some of our cars have these large, nasty cotter-pins that can catch a car-show spectator's clothing and ruin their (and your) day. _One way to lower the odds of that happening is to cover the sharp ends with soft model airplane fuel line (also known as medical tubing.) _Leave about a half-inch of it hanging off the end. _This stuff can be purchased at your local hobby shop.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 05:39 pm:

Bob:
The hardware stores sell a little rubber fitting that can be used also. One end is sealed. I believe they are actually for covering exposed bolt ends or tubing, and come in different sizes and colors There is a name for them, but it escapes me at the moment.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By george house . . .caldwell county, TX on Sunday, September 20, 2015 - 04:07 pm:

My best tip is to not expect those brass lamp covers to maintain your brass in show condition thought the years. Years ago I bought and installed a full set of these OD green canvas outers with soft terry cloth inners for a brass non T 1910 car. Before and after a show I shined the brass brilliantly and covered them. Now, in preparation for a tour I removed the covers and found my carbide AND kerosene brass lamps tarnished and FULL of mud dauber nests. So, now I spent a week shining everything up and place the lamps in the house in a china cabinet. Now it takes only tightening 7 set screws to install prior to a tour or show. I'll only use those covers on a tour when the car is left in a tour HQ parking lot.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, September 21, 2015 - 12:25 pm:

Tim are you talking about Vacuum Port Covers?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Monday, September 21, 2015 - 01:00 pm:

G R: That may be what they are called---will swing by my hardware place and see how they are sold.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 09:31 am:

G R -- they are called screw protectors where I buy them. Come in one of the "variety pack" type plastic boxes. Regards, Tim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Erik Johnson on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 10:37 am:

Bob Coiro:

1) trim the leather strap so it is shorter. There is no reason for it to be sagging like that. It should be parallel with the top socket.

2) get the proper shape and length pins from RV Anderson. The one pictured is WAY too long and the eyelet is not the correct shape. Or, at least cut them so they are shorter and dress up the ends with a file.

3) chuck that plastic tube


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert G. Hester Jr., Riverview, FL on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 11:05 am:

If you drive in parades always set the lever in neutral. That way, if your foot slips off the pedal the car won't lurch forward and stall the engine or knock over a couple of boy scouts or whatever. Also, you can take your foot off the pedal for a few seconds and let the kinks start to unravel.


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