Shimming a Crankshaft Pulley

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Shimming a Crankshaft Pulley
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 09:50 pm:

I've heard of 4 methods (without welding and lathe work):

1. Brass shim
2. Aluminum shim
3. Steel shim
4. JB Weld

Are the brass and aluminum shims to soft? Will they deform and loosen up? Will the JB Weld fail with all the vibration?

Any comments from those who have done this with success?

Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Bender Tulsa Oklahoma on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 09:58 pm:

Never have used a shim. I always lay brass into the bore and than turn it out to the size needed.

Shims may work but just not my choice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Baker on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 10:04 pm:

I bought the aftermarket aluminum pulley but I decided I'm not banging that spring pin into my crankshaft. I don't want to damage my crankshaft or the original bearings on my crank.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 10:06 pm:

Any of the first 3 will work. While brazing will work if you have the tools. You need to find out what the clearance is then half that number for your shim stock example if you have .006 clearance then you need about .003 shim stock.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 10:08 pm:

Point the hole straight down and back it up through the hole in the pan.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By JohnH on Wednesday, September 16, 2015 - 11:06 pm:

I used brass shim which worked well for a while - a couple of years I think. When it failed, I bought the adjustable aluminium pulley which works perfectly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 12:44 am:

I have used brass shims there, and steel shims there, both with long term success. I use J B Weld for a lot of things. But would NOT use it there other than maybe for a "I hope I get home" patch. I would consider using a soda can aluminum shim before J B Weld there. And my experience with soda can aluminum shims in most shim applications has generally been disappointing at best.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary London, Camarillo, CA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 03:51 am:

I just cut a piece from a beer or soda can; it holds up for years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 07:08 am:

Here is one you will laugh at but has worked for over 7,000 miles. I used the Right Stuff, and it is still tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 07:26 am:

Any time I hear of this loose crankshaft pulley problem, I think of what I read in one of my two volumes of "Tinker'n Tips". Can't remember the authors name, and I'm not home right now to look, but a lot of the old-timers here on the forum will remember him:

Also can't remember the exact wording he used, but basically, he said to take the loose pulley off, and turn the engine over a few times with a pipe wrench, and the pipe wrench jaws will "bugger-up" the crankshaft enough so that if you force the pulley back on over the raised metal on the now "buggered-up" crankshaft end and the pulley will stay tight!

"Tinker'n Tips" is full of humor as well as good information, so I've never been sure if Ted was kidding or not! Funny thing is though, I think such a crude "fix" would probably work! FWIW,....harold
P.S. I remember the name Ted",....was it Ted Ashcroft?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 07:30 am:

Ted Aschman.
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/259734.html?1326679056


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 07:35 am:

Thanks Roger,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 10:43 am:

Years ago, my dad pressed a steel sleeve over the outside diameter of the pulley hub. It had the effect of closing down the worn inside diameter of the hub. He may have even had to take a small cut on the inside diameter to get it just right. Anyway, it's been maybe 35 years, still snug, no rattles. (You've got to be careful not to get the sleeve's outside diameter too large as it has to fit inside the cranking spur.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Warren on Friday, September 18, 2015 - 09:12 am:

Use a shim if one will fit and use locktite. If it is not to sloppy just use the locktite. Use the high strength or a bearing/bushing mount. It is amazing how well it works, and if you need to remove it later, just heat it up and it will come free.


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