Wood bands

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Wood bands
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 02:08 pm:

My new motor has wood bands and I would like to know what to expect.

I driven with cotton bands and had Kevlar long enough to learn about the multiple adjustments required when first using them.

They are in the car and it is a 27 motor with wide drums.

I have already sprayed for termites, and it is too hard to take them out to be used for firewood!

What should I expect with wood bands and are there any tricks I need to know.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 02:19 pm:

This is my experience in one of my Model T's with wood bands. I have driven the car for 20 years with the same set of wood bands and have been on quite a few week long tours. After seating and a few initial adjustments they rarely need adjustment. I use Rocky Mt. Brakes so the brake band gets little wear. The reverse does tend to chatter a bit. With use of Ruckstell, I can back up by setting the gas just above idle and pushing down hard on reverse without slipping it. That way I minimize the chatter. I don't have chatter in low.

Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 02:29 pm:

To me, wood and good Scandia no difference...just keep in mind I never feather on an upshift (use the sticks (plural) to handle the load speed change. I also drive like I have no brakes, and pulse my brakes when I am stopping.

I'm told by others that wood bands tend to chirp...but I have never had that happen to me on several cars and suspect that any chirp that comes is from a band that was bent like a pretzel on a through the door band change.

My '19 hack has them and I recently re-did the '15 with Jim Guinn wood bands and that was a hogshead off of course and the 'sound' of stopping sounds nicer :-) (How's that for typical Model T objectivity :-)) The '25 chassis is still Scandia, and the '26 is Kevlar...

I'm probably inside out upside down and backwards...thinking about it now and deeper, I think I drive them all as if they were Kevlar...lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 02:51 pm:

Two of my "T's also have wood bands and I think they are great! I honestly feel that I am easy on bands as I do everything possible (I think) to minimize slipping the low band, and I pump the brakes to "oil cool" the brake band. I would add one thing to what has been said above about the advantages of wood bands. They are very easy on drums as opposed to Kevlar, and they never cause lint to plug up the oil pipe like cotton or Scandinavia bands often do. FWIW,.......harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 02:56 pm:

Thanks Norm and George!

It sounds like I am in for a treat!

My dad taught me to never slip the low or reverse band and drive like there are no brakes.
He also taught me to throttle back when going to high.
When I do use the brakes I pulse them when possible.

I am adding AC brakes (small drum 1919) to help the stopping.



If it begins chirping I will feed it sunflower seed oil! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 03:01 pm:

Wood on the low band works just fine for me. I've read a couple of stories on the forum about those with wood on the brake band who has suddenly lost the brake on a long downhill grade, so I have Kevlar on my brake band. I'd rather risk having to change the brake drum from overheating than loose my brake when I need it the most..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 03:02 pm:

Fred - There is one other thing that I feel will greatly extend the life of your bands, however, I really can't recommend this as it's illegal! I can tell you that to start out from a dead stop, you MUST "slip the low band" at least a little or you will kill the engine. However, I can tell you that a "California stop" can practically totally eliminate any slippage at stop signs and such,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 03:19 pm:

Harold - Your are right -
I was taught to press hard as soon as possible - not let it slip.

Once my dad saw me spin the rear tires as I started off in my 41 Ford.
I tried to explain that I was using the clutch like he told me to drive the Model T - no slippage.
He did not buy my story and I was in trouble! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Thursday, September 17, 2015 - 04:56 pm:

I built an engine for a guy with wood bands. The engine is without mag, but I installed pop up pistons. He is running a warford tranny. It is a speedster and it is powerful off the line and fast. He adjusted the band three times now and runs great.


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