Rear Wheel Removal on í22 Roadster

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Rear Wheel Removal on í22 Roadster
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Hoops - Burton,Texas on Monday, September 21, 2015 - 01:15 pm:

Iím having trouble getting the left rear wheel off of my í22 roadster. The car has normal 30 x 3-1/2Ē clincher rims with four lugs. I tried to get the wheel off with an old puller which looks like the truck puller labeled 2800WPTT in the 2015 Langís catalog but the threads on the hub are almost non existent. Next I loosened the nuts on both rear wheels, reinstalled the cotter keys and drove around on a rough curvy gravel road several times jerking the car around. This loosened the right wheel but not the left one so I drove some more on a chip seal road again jerking the car round to put more strain on the rear axles.

The axle has good threads on it and I hope I donít mess it up. The hub is beaten up badly where someone has hammered on it and perhaps they never got it off. I bought the car in 1986 and never needed to get the hubs off but now need to get the wheels respoked as some spokes are loose.

Looking at the same Langís catalog I see they have puller (2800WP) which can be tightened on the hub. Is this more likely to work than what I have already tried?

Any and all suggestions will be appreciated.

Thanks, Robert


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Monday, September 21, 2015 - 02:14 pm:

Robert, I've found the puller works best. I believe the 2800 BP is the way to go. The 2800BPTT is for the bigger TT truck hubs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Hoops - Burton,Texas on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 05:54 am:

Thanks Michael

I donít think the old puller that I have is for a TT as it fits the T hub and is light weight but it does look a lot like the TT puller in the Langís catalog.

I talked to a man at Langís yesterday and he told me that their T puller is really hefty and heavy (and expensive to mail). I ordered it and have my fingers crossed.

Thanks again, Robert


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 08:12 am:


I'd say it's fifty bucks well spent. I've used mine often.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 08:57 am:

Steve Me too!

I have lost track of the number of times I used mine. Makes life easy!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Milton,WA on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 09:20 am:

Every T owner should have this type of puller as a matter of fact for regular maintenance & inspection procedures !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard A Eddinger Sacrament Ca on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 09:25 am:

I agree the puller shown is great and I have used it often. A must item if you own a T. Very cheap for what it does.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 09:53 am:

If you can get a good grip on it with a hub puller, try this: tighten the lockbolt on the puller well, apply moderate pressure with the center bolt and then tap the center bolt with a 4 lb hand sledge. Don't beat on it or hit multiple times, just one medium whack. tighten another 1/2 turn or so and whack again. Repeat until the hub breaks loose.

The vibration from the hammer whack will often break things loose where simple pressure will not.

Another thing to try is using an air impact wrench set at a very low setting (torque). Again the object is the vibration, not the twisting force. Don't try that at a high setting or you will strip the hub threads for sure.

I have successfully removed threaded bolts and fasteners with an impact wrench, that would have broken off with simple torquing force applied.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 10:23 am:

I have a Ford puller that is a cone shape, with a knocker on the end. I bought it when I was still in my teens. I like it a lot, but rarely see them. They must have only introduced them toward the end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Conger on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 12:06 pm:

Robert

as other posters have stated, the puller in question is a great tool. Just be sure to take off the castle nut and replace on the axle UPSIDE DOWN and thread back on until flush with end of axle. This will keep axle from mushrooming when you apply force.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 01:38 pm:

Seems like in the past, a common bit of advice for removal of a stubborn rear wheel was that if all else failed, to loosen the nut a turn or so, replace the cotter pin, and carefully drive the car a short distance, turning both directions and preferably driving over some rough road if possible to pop the wheel loose. Surprised that advice has not yet come up on this thread,....FWIW,.....harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 01:56 pm:

Harold, read Robert's post again. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 02:22 pm:

Thanks Steve,....I carefully re-read all of the posts AFTER Robert's original post and obviously missed the fact that he had already attempted the "drive it with a loose nut" approach which he explained in his very first paragraph! Not the first time I've stuck my foot in my mouth,........harold


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Hoops - Burton,Texas on Tuesday, September 22, 2015 - 03:43 pm:

Thanks to all of you.

I believe the puller I ordered is like the the one Steve pictured. The one I have now is like the one Larry described (cone shaped). That one won't work as the hub threads are almost gone and won't even hold a hubcap tightly. I'm hoping that screw on the side of the new one will able to tighten things up enough to solve that problem.

Lang's sent an email that it was sent today so it will probably arrive around Saturday or Monday.

Thanks again to all of you and please post any other suggestions you might think of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Hoops - Burton,Texas on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 10:04 am:

Well the drama continues. I received the puller from Langís yesterday evening and
I really like how it clamps onto the hub. But Iím not getting anywhere yet.

What I now fear is that the axle key is jammed somehow into the hub. Both rear axles had thick lock washers between the axle nut and the hub (no lock washers in the T days). On the right (now loose) axle the cotter pin went into the axle correctly, the pin was centered nicely in the castle nut.

On the left (stuck) axle the there was only half of a very thin cotter key twisted into the axle. The castle nut would need to be tightened a lot more to get a correct pin in. Also on close examination I can barely see the end of the axle keyway.

Has anyone encountered a similar situation and how was it resolved?

Thanks for all your help

Robert


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 12:05 pm:

Loosen the nut a turn and put the puller on. Tighten it as far as you can and then drive around turning left turns. Leave the puller on while you drive around. Try tightening the puller again. If it still tight, leave overnight and try tightening again next day. Repeat the drive around. If it still won't work, leave the left wheel with the puller on and tightened. Leave that wheel on the ground and jack up the other side. Give a few sharp raps with a heavy hammer on the bolt of the puller. If you hear a snap, the wheel should come off. Anyway try again to tighten the puller and drive around again. Another type puller is one which you tighten on the axle shaft until it makes contact with the end of the axle. You leave that wheel on the ground and jack up the other side and rap the puller with a large hammer. Sometimes heat applied to the hub can help also. Heat with a torch while someone strikes the puller. If all else fails, replace the rear axle and left wheel!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 12:11 pm:

Robert. I find that aligning the nuts for a cotter key is a pita.
I get the nut where I want it and the slot or hole is one half space off every time.
I suspect that someone tightened the nut a ton on the stuck side and could only only get half cotter key in.

The new puller with some hammering on the tension bolt is the only way I have done it.
Maybe the puller with tension and some driving will do it.
You will need to leave the nut on :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 12:21 pm:

Install the puller. Tighten the center bolt. With both rear wheels off the ground, the axle supported by jack stands, hit the center bolt with a 5 pound hammer. This has always worked for me, but if it doesn't..............

You may have to heat the axle and hub with a torch if the above method doesn't work. Heat until the paint peels on the metal, then let it cool. Should loosen up completely with no damage to the wood.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Hoops - Burton,Texas on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 01:12 pm:

Thanks yíall, Iím going to try driving around with the puller on the hub as was suggested. If heat is needed Iím not too worried about the spokes as they are loose and that is why Iím trying to get the wheel off. If need be I plan to send all four wheels to out for respoking.

Thanks again.

Robert


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 01:26 pm:

Pay close attention to the idea to jack up the OTHER wheel, leaving this wheel on the ground, then strike the puller. You'd be amazed at how well this works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Hoops - Burton,Texas on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 01:46 pm:

Problem solved, Hooray

My hero son-in-law came by late yesterday and spent the night. He works as a mechanic in a large used car business in Houston. He brought some long handled wrenches and a large air hammer with a hammer bit.

This morning he had the wheel off in about 15 minutes. He studied this thread first and I thank you all again for your extremely helpful postings. He didnít need the air hammer but the longer American made wrenches helped. I think the main thing though was age, he is 60 and I am 81.

Thanks, thanks again

Robert


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration