Alternate use for Model T axle shafts

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Alternate use for Model T axle shafts
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kurt Baltrusch on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 10:21 am:

A friend of mine, a retired Montana judge and antique firearms expert, related some interesting information about a well-known Montana rifle barrel manufacturer. The NRA rifle and pistol championships have been held at Camp Perry, Ohio, since 1907. Way back then, J.R. Buhmiller was not satisfied with the barrels he was using, and purchased a high tech “deep hole” boring machine and a rifling machine and began producing his own barrels. His secret? A good relationship with Henry Ford who sent him Model T axle shafts that had been normalized, that is, heat treated to improve ductility and impact toughness. Mr. Buhmiller related this to my friend, who was helping him when he was 15 years old in 1942. Buhmiller was known not as a gunsmith, but a barrel maker, and his barrels are still well known today. According to Mr. Buhmiller, Ford kept this association under wraps as he did not want to cater to this type of business.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 10:38 am:

I have heard that Plomb Tool Co. of Los Angeles used Model T axle shafts obtained at local junk yards to produce the wide range of tools manufactured by them. The metallurgy was perfect and the size of the shafts lent themselves well to the forging dies used for producing the wrenches and other tools made by Plomb.

I know several local guys that collect Plomb tools and covet their collection.

Plomb Tools became Proto.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 11:45 am:

I made a seat post for my antique schwinn out of a t drive shaft. Used the rest of the shaft to make a Chuck wrench for an 18" lathe I used to run. My broken Chevy drive shaft machines differently. More grainy and harder.Ford shafts machine great; a bit milder than L-80 4140. Maybe more like ETD 150.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 11:53 am:

Don't forget about axle shafts with gears still attached being used as circus tent stakes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 11:59 am:

Have you seen that as a kid Steve? Makes sense. Could just see a old photo of a big top set up with them.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 12:23 pm:

Dexter,

I've seen that many times. Not just Model T shafts. Model A & flathead V8 era stuff too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 12:43 pm:

Ford axles were definitely a much higher caliber than other makes. !0)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 02:37 pm:

I've seen it in movies, but I couldn't tell you now which ones.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 03:13 pm:

We used them to stake down the buzz saw.Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Manlove on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 03:30 pm:

I saw them used as tent stakes up until late 70's or early 80's


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Olsen 40 miles west of chicago on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 03:46 pm:

I have used a Buhmiller barreled Mauser! Shot really well out to 800 yards. It was pretty old, I wonder if it was a T axle. Heavy barrel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bob Cascisa - Poulsbo, Washington on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 04:13 pm:

I have seen them used as a Ruckstell shifter.

Be_Zero_Be


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 04:58 pm:

I have seen many used as Steve said, for tent stakes. Almost every water shut off valve on a water line to a house or building has a flat end on top with a hole through it for locking purposes. My Dad used the axle shafts from our first restoration to make a T handle tool to open and close the valve.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Kiefer - Adams, MN on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 06:16 pm:

Horse shoe stakes.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Wednesday, September 23, 2015 - 06:30 pm:

My dad liked Plomb/Proto tools very much. He always talked about collecting as many as he could get, but never got a lot of them. I do have most of what he had, including a nice tool box with the Proto name on it. He had it as far back as I can remember clearly (about 60 years).
He told me that they changed their name because there was another major tool manufacturing company that also used the name "Plomb". They made different types of tools mostly, but there was still confusion from it. He didn't know any details about why they changed, but the other company didn't. I never have really tried to find out.

I have a few old Plomb box end wrenches that I use quite often. Interesting to think that they could have been made from a model T axle? They are good wrenches.
Thanks all.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration