POR 15 and similar products

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: POR 15 and similar products
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:01 am:

I see ads for numerous products that claim that you can paint right over rust and the problem is solved. Do these products work or will I just have more of a problem in a year or so. If so which ones. Maybe I'm getting lazy but I've sandblasted virtually every part of 2 T's and 2 40's model pickups and I'm about to start another project and it sure would be easy just to paint the frame, axle housings etc but would like to get some advice first. I mentioned POR 15 because I'm pretty sure that stands for paint over rust. First one that came to mind. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:09 am:

Corey,
I've used POR-15 for more than 15 years. It does what they claim it does. Every application I've made seems to have stopped the rust in it's tracks, and it builds up "thinned" areas and makes them stronger. However, you must use the Marine Clean and etch as they suggest. They prepare the metal to accept the top coat. In any event, I've used it on several projects and it works great.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:20 am:

James, Thanks. I'll use it then. Seems like that would save a lot of work. My sandblaster is small and it takes forever.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:20 am:

POR and similar products were made to stop structural failure on parts of ships exposed to salt water. The idea was exactly what the name implies - paint over rust. You end up with a crappy looking result, and it does exactly what it says. I've never been happy with crappy looking results personally.

If you are going to prepare the surface for paint, and you want it to look good, POR 15 is lackluster as a top coat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:54 am:

POR-15 manufacturers do not misrepresent the product as a top coat material. They offer other products to go over top the POR-15 in order to smooth out the surface. But if you have rust issues severe enough to require POR-15, you already have a crappy looking surface to begin with. So you have to use something, and unless your going to cut and weld in a completely new panel or part, POR-15 is the only solution that works.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:58 am:

If I had a part that would require POR 15, I would put it aside, and look for a better part!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 10:41 am:

I just want to paint mostly undercarriage parts. Everything is fine just surface rust but if I don't get down to bare metal, rust will pop right back through regular primer/paint. Maybe the bottom of a running board but not sheet metal like fenders or the body. Just wanted to save a little time. You would have to crawl under the car to see that my torque tube isn't perfect.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Garrett on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 11:32 am:

POR 15 worked very well on my frame and suspension. One nice thing about it is that it is far tougher than ordinary paint and resists chipping. A word of caution though - anything with the POR coating exposed to sunlight over time will discolor unless it is given a proper top coat. Follow POR's recommendations for that process.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marv Konrad (Green Bay's a suburb!) on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 11:33 am:

Am still 'in process', but Don Booth swears by the 'Rust-Bullet' product. Less flash-time, great durability, fills nicely, ease of handling, and gets harder with humidity. My own research also finds very kind utilization reports for historical projects. Has anyone else used the 'Rust-Bullet'???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 01:58 pm:

I believe I used "Rust-Mort" on the roof of Western Pacific locomotive 805A some 20 years ago. As far as I know, the paint is still holding--yes, overcoated it with Centari acrylic enamel. The area was too complex to wire-brush & couldn't get a sandblaster up there on the roof!
Just my results--oh and up there, the finish just has to hold, too many surfaces for anyone to notice roughness in the finish.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dylan Thomas Wills on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 02:21 pm:

I've used POR-15 on many areas of my families Studebakers. Seems to work quite well, have had a few "failures" but after some investigation it seemed to stem from a contaminant on the metal being coated. Overall, I really like it.

I recently began using Masterseries paints on our personal cars as well as customers. I really like it so far, and it's cheaper then POR-15 in my area. http://www.masterseriesct.com/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 04:04 pm:

Everyone with whom I have discussed POR 15 speaks well of it, but if you use it, about the only method that you can ever use for a repaint is POR 15, or sandblast the part.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Wotherspoon - Melbourne Australia on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 04:50 pm:

I used POR 15 on both my 1915 T and my Morris Mini. I found it to be excellent for items like the chassis or sub frames on the Mini as it dried to a really hard finish.
As indicated earlier small blemishes in the surface were filled and the finish came up like it had been painted in 2K.
One word of warning, don't get it on your clothing or skin. It says that on the tin, but of course I didn't take notice of that. The only way to get it off my hands was for it to wear off, and that took nearly 2 weeks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 07:50 pm:

I use POR-15 exclusively on all of my vehicles, heck even the new ones I am keeping!
Like stated be sure to use the metal prep but truth be told, the metal prep is just naval jelly dissolved in water. I mix a few tablespoons of it in a squirt bottle to achieve the same results.

Another thing is to always topcoat it like stated by others here because it will deteriorate. All you have to do is wait til it gets tacky then dust it with one layer of cheap spray paint just so your primer or topcoat has something to grab on to.

My roadster was nearly rust free when I got it with the exception of some surface flash rust but I used it to strengthen the lower body of the car. For that I use a POR-15 patch which is just applying a coat of POR-15 then laying sheets or strips of fiberglass roving or mats and dabbing them down with a paintbrush . Keep doing that til you get three sheets thick and it makes that old tin quite formidable from dings from rocks :-)
They just spring back out.

Also if you have any rust holes, if you use some duct tape to patch over the hole on the exterior of the panel you can then apply a POR-15 patch on the backside then let it dry and remove the tape to give you a backing that you can use filler over. Ive done this on some of my mustangs.

Here are some pics of my car and its undercarriage when I was first rewooding the body.
Not only do I use it on metal but I also use it on wood too. If you thin it with thinner you can apply it to your body wood or top bows or spokes to make them impervious to rot. the water literally beads up and rolls off the wood once you've got several coats soaked in and cured :-)
See this link....

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/118802/171530.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 07:53 pm:

Oops... here they are.

Excuse the dust, it covered all my shiny work lol






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 07:59 pm:

Great product. We use it and abuse it all the time. I mostly use it on frames, floor boards ect. Get the part as clean as you can. Remove flaking rust but heavy surface rust is OK. Scratch the seams and corners with a screw driver or ice pick ect. Remember that you can not paint any paint over loose dirt, dust or oil, and expect anything but a failure. In seams and panels as well as behind brackets, I brush and "slop" it on and then "blow" it into the cracks and seams with a air blower. That way you get paint to where you could never paint with any other means. You can also wipe off the excess and then finish up with the normal painting you would normally do. As stated above do not get it on you, it will not come off, So wear a face shield, and cover everything else in sight, if blowing with the blower unless you like the black polka dot effect :-):-) for a few weeks. Do not ask how I know that :-). For trunk floors or other areas with pin holes in it, you can brush paint the part in the area of the holes and then paint a thin fiberglass patch over the holes. either cloth or mat is OK. After it dries you can sand smooth and all the pin holes are gone. I have never had a failure yet with POR 15. Just remember, NO oily surface , NO loose dirt, and NO dusty surface. Best results will be with a brushed on paint job, as it rubs the paint into the surface. Good luck with it, I think you will come to like it very much. Another product you should never be with out is Quik-poly but that is another story ... for later ... :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 08:20 pm:

Lots of good information, thanks. It'll be a while before I use it for what I have in mind but I have a 4 door 73 IHC pickup and the top is solid rust. I'm going to brush some on there and see if I can save it. Great truck but it must have got one coat at the factory and sat outside since 73.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Sherman Tacoma WA on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:10 pm:

Patrick, do you use gloss or flat POR-15 on the chassis?
Paul in Tacoma


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Corey Walker, Brownsboro TX on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:18 pm:

Patrick, If you use it on wood such as spokes do you sand them down to bare wood or scuff up the old paint?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Patrick Martin on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 09:39 pm:

Paul, I use gloss. I took the attached pics after I blew out the shop trying to get the bulk of the sawdust out. What you see is just dust and dirt that settled on the parts.

Corey, I put it on new spokes or old by sanding them lightly then thinning it to where its like water and allowing each coat to soak in. Works perfect!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 06:17 am:

Rust Bullet Rust Inhibitor Paint

For the treatment of rusted or corroded parts, there may be no better product than Rust Bullet—a patented rust inhibitor coating you simply paint on that eliminates the need for pre-treatment products or special surface preparations. According to Rust Bullet, the first coat penetrates rusted areas of metal, dehydrates the rust, and makes it a compact solid again by intertwining itself in the resin matrix to become whole with the coating. Rust Bullet guarantees their product will stop rust and provide rust protection for 10 years. For your next automotive restoration job, attack rust and corrosion with Rust Bullet. Rust proofing has never been easier - shop Rust Bullet at SummitRacing.com and stop rust today!
Apply Rustbullet to the metal and wood to seal. Then apply your feathering agent and recoat with Rustbullet. Doing this will lock the feathering agent from absorbing moisture and your project will last way longer then the owner.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 06:28 am:

The cars I've restored are completely immersed in Rustbullet. You can use any paint over it and it takes the place of epoxy primer. Surface prep is minimal and it sands smooth enough to use high build primer and then finish paint. Rustbullet Blackshell can be applied over it and you have as tuff a coating as powder coating is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Lebeda, Humboldt, SD on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 09:25 am:

I used POR-15 on my C-door frame. Looks pretty good, but would have liked to try Rust-Bullet? But for POR-15; keep it out of your hair, scalp, hands, etc. It is hard to remove from you skin!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, September 30, 2015 - 05:14 am:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WKh4V-5KXB4 A video to watch on Rustbullet...for the bored hobbyist.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Wednesday, September 30, 2015 - 08:20 am:

I used Rustbullet on my 24 touring body. There was no rust out, but total surface rust as it had been abandoned in a field. I lightly sandblasted it and then used Rustbullet on it. Seemed to work well.


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