What Type of Nut Is This

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: What Type of Nut Is This
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 02:19 pm:

I reluctantly began the process of taking the top wood off yesterday. Holding down the carriage bolts to the body were these type of nuts. I have never seen them before and I do not have a tool to loosen them. Can anyone tell me what type of nuts they are and what type of tool I need before I modify a slotted screwdriver? Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 04:11 pm:

My '27 Tudor used these also. I've never seen the specific Ford tool used on them. I think I made a tool by grinding a piece of sheet steel to fit.

They're kind of a neat fastener. I may make a run of them if there's enough interest.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Stan Howe Helena, Montana on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 05:01 pm:

Several years ago I made a dozen or so of those from brass for a friend that was working on a Saxon. He had looked all over and couldn't find any of them. We didn't know what to call them either so we decided they were slotted tapered nuts. His were IIFC 12/24 thread.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 05:25 pm:

I like them. They were used in my '25 Tudor to hold the top to the front pillar on each end of a L-shaped threaded stud. They were referred to in a previous thread: "What made the job totally miserable are those carriage screws the heads of which are unaccessible without removing the entire interior and the stupid tapered, slotted, nuts (I got every one of them off!) that secure the wood to the body."

I haven't been able to find a name for them either. I would add "round" to Stan's "slotted tapered nut" description.

Removing them without destroying the wood is difficult. Installing them with a homemade tool is fairly easy.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 05:34 pm:

Coach building washers of the same shape, usually made of cast iron, are called an OGEE washer, don't know when threaded, may be a ogee nut?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 05:40 pm:

They are also used in Model A Fords.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 05:51 pm:

I have never run into those on a model T. But for something similar, I used the pointed jaws of a pair of needle-nose pliers to remove and tighten them. Worked okay.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis Melnick -Waterford , Pa on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 06:00 pm:

I modified a slotted screwdriver to remove them from the old top wood in my 27 Tudor.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 10:09 pm:

I managed to salvage every one when I re-wooded the top for my '27 Tudor.
Re-used them too....... :-O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Shore on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 10:12 pm:

I used a 5/16 socket 1/4 inch drive and ground the sides until I had the two points.Then I was able to use a 1/4 in ratchet for better leverage. The problem is when they are real rusty, the bolt well turn.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, September 26, 2015 - 10:39 pm:

If you use a screw driver or make your own tool, make the sides parallel not tapered to fit the slot. Same idea as when working on carburetors, the better the fit the more likely NOT to bugger the slot up.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 01:20 am:

There are "security" type bits available for apex drivers that would work nicely with these
nuts. Mine are made by Klein for the specialty electrical tradesman, but I see generics for
sale all the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 02:36 pm:

About half of the ones on my car were rusted to the carriage bolts, so I had to take a cutting tool to get them out. I called Langs and they do not carry a bolt/nut kit. Any idea where I could find these nuts?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 03:08 pm:

Jim, I picked up several of those nuts and bolts on Ebay a couple of years ago. I knew I was possibly going to need them, so I bid on them. Got them for a song, I was the only bidder. I guess no one else knew what they were for. That's the only place I've seen them, and that was a one time deal. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 06:45 pm:

I was thinking that these type of nuts were used on most of the closed T's.
My 24 Coupe and the 25 Fordor I use to have has these type of nuts in the front door pillar.

I was careful not to lose them when I restored my 24 Coupe.

These could be made fairly easily out of a piece of round stock of the same diameter as the widest
part of the nut.

Cut a piece of round stock the same width of the nut. Drill and tap to correct size. (1/4 or 5/16"
cant remember for sure).
Cut the slot with a hacksaw and then hold it with vise grips to carefully grind the taper angle.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 10:03 pm:

These are simply called round slotted nuts. There are several suppliers with listings for these, don't know if the cone style are still available but wouldn't really matter. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Page on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 11:23 pm:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/179374/241469.html?1319586929



Regards, John Page , Australia


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