Question Regarding Re-wooded Wood Felloe Wheels

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Question Regarding Re-wooded Wood Felloe Wheels
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 01:54 pm:

This question is only for folks who have had wood felloe wheels rebuilt.
I am preparing to have four wheels rebuilt and have some questions: What constitutes an acceptable rim for rebuilding? How do you check for a good rim.
Can anyone explain the status of what they sent in for rebuilding and the final outcome?
Any real world experience you can supply would be helpful.
Ron Patterson


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 03:22 pm:

My unfortunate recent experience was that I failed to notice one of the rims I sent Stutzman was warped. After he told me that I was able to find a good one to send him. Lay each rim on a flat surface and be sure it lies flat all around. Of course, you also want to be sure none of your rims are sharpened by rust damage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 03:56 pm:

I spoke with George Garrigan some time ago. He is the fellow who respokes wheels in California He straightens rims that are bent before he installs the wood felloes and spokes. He also turns the front hubs as they are often out of true. The rears are usually OK. He also explained how to make the copper sleeve that the valve stem comes up through. Interestingly he has no antique cars but has built scale rail cars that are impossibly complicated and detailed. He was a wealth of information.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 03:56 pm:

What Steve said, plus checking the clinch for flattened or bent spots.

If you have a rim or two that won't pass muster, and if you can't locate a nice replacement, then get a new one. Spendy for sure, but dirt cheap compared to the cost of an accident. Wheels and brakes (and/or the driveline, since in a T it's part of the braking system) are no places for compromise. Economize somewhere else.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 04:03 pm:

Here is the check list from the old days.



As Steve noted, be sure the rims are rust free, this rusted away on the clincher edge, gone edge, will wreck a tire. The rolled clincher edge must be smooth radius and at least 1/8" thick.


Forget about this used and rusty rim, flaked away metal from rust leaves the clincher edge too thin.


Good to use.

Got new non-demountable rims placed on set of wood felloe by Anderson Wood wheels, that's the best results.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill in Adelaida Calif on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 08:59 pm:

If the rim is still mounted to the old wheel you can spin it to get an idea of how true it is.
I had two wood fellow wheels rebuilt by Johnsons in OK and supplied them with one rim, bought 1 new rim and supplied 2 new rear hubs that I happened across at an opportune time. They said those were the first two hubs that they had seen that were true!

Bill


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Perry Goble on Sunday, September 27, 2015 - 10:00 pm:

Years ago be four rims were reproduced or just impossible to to find like 28/3 s . We repaired the knife edge in this way . The best repair bead material is tie wire you can get from a lumber yard . It is the wire that holds bundles of re bar together. It is soft and the wright size to make a new bead . You place the wire on top of the rim were the knifing is and mark along side the wire . cut along the line and remove the material with the sharp edge . Then weld in the tie wire . I have pictures of the process , but do not know how to put on here .


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