Small Paint Jobs - Any rattle can work?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Small Paint Jobs - Any rattle can work?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Dachenbach on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 07:55 am:

I have a mounting plate for a speedometer that I need to paint black. I've tried a couple different black paints in a can ( Rustoleum and Valspar) and was disappointed in that the black was not a real black. Appears to have a bit of brown in it compared to the black on the body. Are there any ways to get a true black for those tiny jobs?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 08:21 am:

Depending on the size of the plate, I have been known to pour some Rustoleum (from the quart cans not rattle cans) into a shallow pan and dip the part to be painted then let it hang and drip dry I usually do not thin the paint for this application but on cooler days it may be required.:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 08:48 am:

My favorite for painting small items black is Rustoleum Appliance Epoxy enamel. Not too expensive, easily obtained (Home Depot - Walmart) and tough as nails. Only comes in black and white and the black is black.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 08:56 am:

Ace Hardware's Gloss Black is my choice.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Osterman on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 09:09 am:

Add some powdered lamp black to the glossy black Rustoleum. Thin as needed and apply with a spray gun.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 09:52 am:

The best rattle can is automotive enamel, (have to find auto paint supply stores that stock or can order for you ) after that I like Seymour gloss, engine paint, (I get it at big swap meet paint vendors) it goes on smooth and lays out without runs, good for engine, great for sheet metal and small parts. Third in the running is hardware store Rust-Oleum enamel, good black, but the other two are better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 10:15 am:

I'm with Bud, I like the Rustoleum Appliance Epoxy,

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Dachenbach on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 10:31 am:

I just ordered a can of the Nason 402-01. Had to order through CARQUEST from one of their remote stores. I'm in the Columbus, OH area. It is owned by DuPont now so I hope it is a truer black. I found that the Rust-oleum high gloss black was foggy and a bit off color when I matched it up against the rest of my car. Looked great until I put it next to the car. Hope DuPont hasn't screwed up Nason!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 10:50 am:

In the months proceeding my jumping into the Model T scene, I went to visit my friend John, who
has several. His house stunk of rattle can paint, and he proudly showed me the freshly painted
wheels he was redoing for one of his car in the basement. There on the counter were several spent
cans of black paint. It was a turning point for me, and the moment I really committed to getting a T
(or two).

See, with my 50's cars, the era was refined. A ratty finned car really looks like hell. A poorly painted
finned car really looks like hell, but a ratty, or poorly painted Model T looks downright perfect ! Even
better than a flawlessly painted example ! All I see in trying to make a T "perfect" is an anal retentive
rube trying to polish a turd ! :-)

Sure, you can make them look nice. Fix the dents, get a reasonable shine to them. But to go all "Rainman"
trying to make them flawless ??? Isn't that kind of running counter to the whole idea of owning a T ?
I was sold. No more $10,000 paint jobs and just as many hours making them perfect. No, ... just bang
'em into place, knock out the kinks, and shoot it with a rattle can of black ! Not "the right black" ???
who cares ? Get another can and shoot it again ! :-) Now, that kind of approach puts the fun back in
old cars and I can enjoy NOT worrying about scratches and wear. Cuz a fix is just a $2 can of paint away ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Douglas Dachenbach on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 11:07 am:

I love the forum. It is so much fun. Thanks everyone. Lightened my day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 12:11 pm:

Douglas has bumped into the "Black isn't Black" dilemma. Most Blacks are brown-based, but some are Blue-based. The Blue-based color makes the brown-based black look, well, brown!
I haven't painted for a while, but back when I could get Concept paint, they had both kinds, the Blue-based had a 4 digit color code, the brown was something like 99 (part of my memory says that was also the Centari black code number, but once again, not the blue-based black you are looking for!).
Now, off-topic, but when I get to doing my '16 DB touring, I plan on the blackest blue for the body, black fenders, and (as stock on DB) robin-egg blue wheels. All of this trimmed with a fawn grey pinstripe. Yeah, not factory color (Black was factory!)on the body, but with a car that expensive, I know one could order it painted however one wanted. That's my story & I'm a stickin' to it!
:-)
Paint 'em if ya got 'em!
Heh heh heh
David


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 06:49 pm:

David,
Perhaps the blue-based paint is called "blue-black" in some of the early literature? I believe the 1914 Kansas license plate background was called blue-black. I'm thinking I've even seen early cars that said they were painted blue-black.
Verne Shirk
Wichita, KS


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 07:39 pm:

I found motor high temp paint works great on chassis parts as well as other small items covers well resistant to oil gas grim whether and it can be had in gloss Matt and flat oh drys fast and very durable


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 07:59 pm:

Does the type of paint and the type of application make a difference? By type I mean lacquer vs enamel.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 08:23 pm:

Verne,
I've been wondering that too, as the T was one of those "blue-black" cars.
This is, of course not the Black-blue that IS blue, but looks black until you get it out in the sun.
Gee, this could get confusin' !
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 08:44 pm:

Douglas

Think you will like that Nason spray. My local shop closed so will have to find another supply. All out now.

So used Auto enamel from Rust Oleum, and liked it.
Got this fender for Lizzie, it was nearly NOS, with lots of shiny original paint, so just wiped it clean with thinner, sanded lightly in a few spots, and sprayed. The match to the old Dupont paint from 1981 on the body was fine....can't tell I added a new fender!





Have tried to use the Appliance epoxy, but poor results over primer. Always use an automotive primer in spray can for little parts, perhaps its a lacquer base primer, auto enamel and Rust Oleum sprays always work over it, but the appliance epoxy just crazed....had to rework a lamp housing last time trying appliance epoxy rattle can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Monday, September 28, 2015 - 10:14 pm:

I normally have used Rustoleum on stuff for years. But I ran out 1 day on a non T project and got a can of Ace Hardware gloss black and now there is some on the shelf all the time for small odd jobs. Goes on nice and drys quick.

The dipping in Rustoleum,hum,never thought of doing that.May have to try that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, September 30, 2015 - 10:23 am:

I can't imagine redoing a T without a spray can of black Rustoleum. I use it for just about all of my small chassis parts, and even used it once on a Jno.Brown sidelight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Thursday, October 01, 2015 - 09:45 pm:

The only black paint I will use any more is Valspar Gloss Black.
It's the shiniest BLACK black I've ever used so....... <shrug>


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James Chochole, Oswego, IL on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 11:40 pm:

Hey Dan,
Quick question- when you sprayed the Automotive Enamel paint- did you use primer first as a base coat, or just go right over the top with a new paint coat?

I am thinking about trying it.

Thanks,
Jim


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 12:34 am:

I use two kinds of rattle can paint.


For engine, frame, & chassis parts, Rustoleum satin black.


For wheels & body parts, glossy epoxy appliance enamel (Ace or Rustoleum). If there's orange peel to fill, I use primer. If the part is smooth, no primer needed.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 02:57 am:

I painted three of my fenders and both seat boxes with Rustoleum black specialty lacquer.



The body is acrylic lacquer Dupont Pitch which was the blackest black I could find in the 70's. Both fenders are rattle can painted with Rustoleum black specialty lacquer



This is the blackest black I could find in the Rustoleum line and even smells a bit like lacquer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 04:13 am:

I have had good luck with Rustoleum "Professional Series" spray paint. If buffed out, it has a pretty respectable gloss to it, but not like a base coat clear coat. It sure is cheaper and easier to use though! It holds it's gloss MUCH longer than the regular Rustoleum, which, if left out in the weather will start to dull after a year or so. Martin, I haven't seen that Rustoleum lacquer paint before. How does it stand up to the sun and weather? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Killecut on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 07:44 am:

Most auto body supply stores can put actual automotive paint in spray cans for you. More expensive than hardware store paint, but the real thing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman Bolz on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 09:13 am:

Dupont sold it's coatings division including Nason,
Centari, etc. To Axalta on February 1, 2013.
Axalta coating systems @ Axaltacs.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 09:26 am:

Lacquer Spray can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, November 16, 2015 - 05:23 pm:

Axalta got Jeff Gordon and the 24 with the deal.
It was strange not seeing Dupont on the car after so many years.

I got to sit in one and steer it as they pushed it out of a trade show many years ago.
Once outside they let me fire it up but would not let me drive it into the truck. They were smart about it! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, November 16, 2015 - 05:50 pm:

Axalta got Geff Gordon and the 24 along with the deal.
It was strange not seeing Dupont on the car after so many years.

I got to sit in one and steer it as they pushed it out of a trade show many years ago.
Once outside they let me fire it up but would not let me drive it into the truck. They were smart about it! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, November 16, 2015 - 05:51 pm:

woops sorry
The bartender at PDH in Atlanta interrupted me and I lost where I was

(Message edited by nhusa on November 16, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, November 16, 2015 - 05:59 pm:

Hey Dan,
Quick question- when you sprayed the Automotive Enamel paint- did you use primer first as a base coat, or just go right over the top with a new paint coat?


James

That fender was 95% original Ford baked enamel on the outer and inner surfaces. Just scrubbed with wet/dry paper on spots that were free of paint and had a tad of rust showing and softly wiped over the fender with a Scotch Brite Pad. Then wiped surfaces clean with lacquer thinner.

Sprayed rattle can RustOleum Auto enamel gloss black right on top of that 80 year old Ford enamel, worked for me :-)


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