1926 Model T Tudor project

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 1926 Model T Tudor project
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Saturday, October 03, 2015 - 07:32 am:

Just got this dropped off at my door. Mechanically its been rebuilt. Mostly body work and paint. It should keep me warm this winter...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Saturday, October 03, 2015 - 10:08 am:

Body work? Sheesh, I would drive the wheels off it as is!
But depending on how long ago it was painted,probably has filler popping out that is not visible in the photos.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Saturday, October 03, 2015 - 10:26 am:

Yeah Mack the pictures don't do it justice. The entire car is rough and appears it was never primed. The top wood is coming off and will get done right. The previous owners tried to put the thick window channel in and that doesn't work. They are all too tight to move without wrecking the risers. Wrong nuts and bolts throughout, but it came with many new parts. The upholstery and top kit included, spare radiator, books, tools and all brand new tires.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, October 03, 2015 - 11:07 am:

Don,
So is it yours, or a "job"? Hope the upholstery kit fits!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Saturday, October 03, 2015 - 11:34 am:

David, it belongs to Judge Richard Bayne (ret) he is a long time friend of the family. Now in his middle 80's this has been on his bucket list for some time. So the pressure is on to make it a fancy-dan'r !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Saturday, October 03, 2015 - 08:07 pm:

Mac, I thought the same thing. But Booth has been to my garage, looking over my project, and the first thing he told me was "You could fix all that, those dents would all bump out.And I thought I was almost finished.. That looks like a great project to freshen up. And for those of us good'nuf guys, we can watch the progress. Don keeps that workshop at a cozy 42 degrees all winter, this will give him some some money for the pellet stove...Can't wait to see it Don! JD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 06:25 am:

JD I would really like my Slim Whitman 8 track tape back...really~


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hap Tucker in Sumter SC on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 06:49 am:

Don,

Some of us used to have lots more time to get to our project(s). And some how after the last 40 years there seems to be less time now.... Glad you will be able to "get'er done" for him. And yes, please keep folks posted on tricks and techniques we may be able to use on our own projects.

Respectfully submitted,

Hap l9l5 cut off


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 07:39 am:

Good Morning Hap!! I'm not sure the forum is the place to test things. There seems to be a rather stiff crowd that has about as much tolerance as a preacher at a house of ill repute. I don't have the experience or knowledge to argue with those that have had a lifetime of reviving the Model T's. But I do know a thing or two about modern sealants and wood preservation. So I will try to keep things moving with this project and post what won't get me in trouble...Thx Hap


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 09:40 pm:

I like Slim Whitman!

Yeah, and you know all about how us perfectionists is. Now excuse me, while I go out and sand some Bondo on my '15 runabout.
Just had to yank your your chain a bit Don B! Looks like another one you will make beautiful. (But I really do need to go out and sand some Bondo, it should be dry by now.)
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 05:18 am:

Ok everybody!! Written proof that Wayne has fully recovered and back to normal. That's a good thing and proof there is a God. And yes Wayne bust my chops any time but turn down that dang music! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 07:55 pm:

Its coming along, and is pretty solid other than 3 spots. The top wood has to be completely redone and I won't use a glue gun like the prior did.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 07:57 pm:

I checked the numbers and they match. So that should make the owner smile...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 10:35 am:

You don't believe in wasting time do you, Don? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 11:07 am:

John, I'm the kind of guy that can't sit down...me butt has been chewed too many times throughout life. :/


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 01:44 pm:

Don B. did you sand the body or did you use paint remover to take off the paint. If the previous owner had already removed the rust and paint or whatever that would make using a paint stripper the way to go. Just curious how you did it.

By the looks of the inside of the body the car was pretty decent to begin with. Doesn't look like it was a rust bucket that some have started with. Myself included.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 03:13 pm:

John, I use the "Polycarbide Abrasive Wheels" because it will take the paint, bondo and rust off at the time. I do it outside because of the mess it creates and eye, ear and breathing protection is a must. The tighter spots I use a wire wheel on the 4" grinder. Today I'm welding in the patches on the wheel wells and one on the cowl. All in all the car is in pretty good condition just typical water trap rust.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 11:48 am:

Don, In a friend's restoration shop he uses Roloc Clean and Strip discs on his 4" grinder, are they the same thing you're using? I know his method sure works well for doors and fenders.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 01:30 pm:

John, I'm not aware of Roloc Clean but I do use "Metal Blast" for prep. And yes on a 4" grinder.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 01:32 pm:

Does anyone know what this placard would be? It is located on the driver side A pillar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 02:03 pm:

Is that a Ford numbered plate or actually related to the car? I'm not sure Ford used Philips screws to attach it. Maybe an ID tag for a company that owned the T way back when?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 03:50 pm:

My questions exactly, John. I'm also wondering if it is some kind of State of Michigan vintage auto ID tag?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 05:30 am:

http://www.harborfreight.com/4-1-2-half-inch-nylon-abrasive-wheel-94017.html


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 05:37 am:

People that use these complain of them not lasting long. The trick is not to apply pressure,but rather let the disc float on the paint or surface. It isn't easy to do because you tend to push down on the wheel as it strips which wears them out quickly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 07:08 am:

The plate seems to be much newer than the car because of the phillips screws.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 07:14 am:

Might be from '71?
Obviously something that was demanded by the local DMV in Michigan, maybe because the original engine was swapped or because it was common for new cars to have ID tags somewhere on the body than, so certainly some old car that was re registred had to have it too, according to this particular civil servant's set of rules :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 11:41 am:

Don your photo answered my question. It seems that 3M refers to their Poly Abrasive discs by the "Roloc" brand name. My son just told me that their mechanics use a 2" version to remove gasket residue and to clean surfaces before reassembling engine parts etc. They refer to the disc/airtool combination as the "Roloc".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 12:20 pm:

John I have used similar disc's and have them on hand. The Polycarbide discs leave the surface with just the right amount of scratches for the Rustbullet to adhere, which is a good thing. I'll go through about 20 or so per car and don't have to worry about media/sand blasting damage. Me likes !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Martel in Temperance MI on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 11:10 pm:

Dan,
How do they do on thick lacquer?
Do they "load up"?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Friday, October 16, 2015 - 05:10 am:

Hi Chuck, the disc's work good on everything I've run in to. The cars have had the original paint which tends to "smear" a bit but it really isn't a problem. You may have to make a quick second swipe over those areas. Also, when I get the car stripped down I wipe it all down with lacquer thinner to get any remaining smudges off. The disc's seem unaffected by lacquer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

Can anyone tell me if the 26 Tudor had a dome light? If so approximately where it was mounted and also where the switch would have been? Thanks in advance...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 06:04 pm:

No dome light on the Tudors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Monday, October 19, 2015 - 10:00 pm:

Don, what is the "Metal Blast" you referred to earlier and where do you get it? Thanks. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Monday, October 19, 2015 - 11:00 pm:

I got curious about a couple of Phillips screws that I found in my 1927 T. I Googled Phillips screws and found that they were not invented until the 1930s. They were (obviously) never used by the factory in any Model T.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Monday, October 19, 2015 - 11:15 pm:

John - That's right, there were NO Phillips screws on any Model T's.

I'm a Judge for the MTFCI and you would think that people who prepare their T for judging would know and make sure that they don't have any Phillips head screws on their cars, since they will and do lose points for that, but every year we find some T's that have them.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Mullins Spokane Wa. on Monday, October 19, 2015 - 11:50 pm:

Don I just checked some pictures of a 27 tudor I had & it did have a dome light & switch on right pillar.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 02:00 am:

Don, my original '27 Tudor has/had no trace of a dome light or switch.
The original headliner was in it before I replaced the top but was too fragile to save but there was definitely no sign of a light.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 02:24 am:

If you ordered a new Tudor at a dealer in 1927 and said you wanted a dome light like in the Fordors, I'm sure they could fix it for you if you just waited another day and didn't mind adding another dollar to the bill. But Ford didn't put them in the Tudors at the assembly line.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chuck Martel in Temperance MI on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 03:42 am:

Ditto,
Original 27 Tudor, with no evidence of a dome light or switch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 03:44 am:

David, Metal Blast is a surface cleaner prep that Rustbullet sells. Just spray or wipe it on to eliminate surface oils for better adhesion of the automotive gray.

Thanks guys it sounds like it would be correct with or without the dome light. This 26 didn't show any signs of having one. Never a dull moment restoring a Model T...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 07:04 am:

The dome light would only be "correct" as in period correct and "would have been possible in those days, but very unusual" - but not "correct" in a judged by the MTFCI situation. It depends on what you want to do with the car :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 07:39 am:

"period correct" I stand corrected ... period~


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Mullins Spokane Wa. on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

I have to add the Tudor I had was all original I was the third owner I took pictures of everything
& it did have a dome light.I compared it to a original 27 Fordor I had & they were identical.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 01:58 pm:

I got the wood top kit straightened out and reinstalled today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 02:11 pm:

That cannot be beet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 07:28 pm:

Don B, You do such nice work! I would be almost ashamed to show some of the work I am doing after looking at your pictures. I don't do too badly, but it doesn't look nearly as nice as what you do!

Time to go out and get a little work done on the runabout! Maybe I'll crank up the ol' tape player.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 07:36 pm:

Thanks Wayne, you are a kind man.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 07:50 pm:

Thanks Don. Would "Metal Prep" be basically the same thing? Keep the pictures coming! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Tuesday, October 20, 2015 - 10:42 pm:

A day off on the sugar beet harvest and you went right back to work on that Lizzie, what could be sweeter than that. You didn't use a glue gun on the joints like the last resto did ya? Looking great, JD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 21, 2015 - 04:56 am:

David, yes it is and it isn't really necessary as long as the loose dirt and rust is removed. Rustbullet loves rust to adhere too so no need to over do the cleaning of the metal.

JD, you got that right ! I'll take working on the T's any day compared to that beet topping crap. I guess I lucked out that the prior owner used the glue gun because it all just peeled right off without damaging the wood. The top wood is laid in a bed of PL-S30 now and 3M 5200 was used on all the joints. She will be tough as nails and still be able to flex without snapping the joints.

I took the water pump off the engine today and found it was locked up tight. While putting the outlet back on I discovered the block threads were stripped out, I had to go to a larger thread and bolts to get the outlet tight to the block. Just another little surprise encounter.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 21, 2015 - 10:44 am:

Here is a quick made jig for hammering out the fenders. The mission is to get the fenders pressed seam back. These rear fenders were very banged up and the prior owner shaped them with bondo instead of hammering them out. Note I made the jig narrow on the left side and wider on the right to accommodate different widths. So far its working out to where I can have something to work with to get them back to the original shape. If anybody has a better way to do it without expensive special tools please tell us. This had been the most common problem with these old T's and it sure would be nice to find a easier way...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 04:40 pm:

Rust cut out and new metal welded in. It is time to immerse this critter with Rustbullet. Top is also sealed in Rustbullet. It also is bedded on the top of the body with PL-S30 and the joints along with the slats are joined with 3M 5200 Marine adhesive.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 04:45 pm:

Amazing progress for only 1 month's time!

Don, I always enjoy your restoration threads. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 05:29 pm:

Wow! You have accomplished in less than a month what took me a year to do - and your restoration looks 100 times better than mine! My front and rear fenders were quite battered, as well. I wish I had your jig - it looks like it really does the job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 06:24 pm:

Hi Don, looks like good progress. Do you use Automotive type Rust Bullet or the regular? Also. Did you end up spraying it and if so did you have to thin it and if so what did you use? Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 06:39 pm:

Thank you Mark and Jim I really appreciate your complements, truly a incentive to do good.

Joe, I use the Automotive Gray Rustbullet and I sprayed it right out of the can. I do open the gun adjustments to the max and I adjust the spray width to about 6 or 7 inches. I also have the pressure up to around 60lbs. Rustbullet sprays with a heavy texture but when it dries it actually shrinks to the center from the outside edges. It is important to coat the edges of what you are spraying heavier than the center. It lays down unbelievably great. I love the stuff!! Then you can go right to the "high build primer", no need for epoxy primer at all.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 07:48 pm:

Wow, that is great progress Don! Part of the secret to that fine finish work goes to the expensive professional spray tools he buys. My neighbor [Bill ] stopped by Saturday and said he saw you with handfuls of spray guns and coupons at the local HF...Don, what do you clean up the guns with, a Rustbullet product or something like enamel reducer, laq thinner, ? Looks really good...JD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 07:56 pm:

Thanks Don, I am getting closer to being ready to use Rust Bullet on my roadster--sure not as far along as you are however. I bought regular Rust Bullet in quarts--not sure if will spray OK or not? Have you sprayed the regular? Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 08:09 pm:

JD, I use lacquer thinner to clean up the guns and tips.

Joe, I'm not sure what "regular" Rustbullet is? I've always used the "Automotive Gray".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 09:16 pm:

Don, I took a closer look at my can and it does say Automotive ,so I'm all set. By the way, any problem spraying this stuff outside? Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 04:36 am:

Joe, I just sprayed this outside yesterday. The only problem I had was some slight wind blowing the spray around. But, it sure beats trashing the barn with paint dust. Rustbullet flashes very quickly and dries rather fast, depending on the humidity. The more humid it is the faster it dries. The coating will take overnight to see the final results, it lays down even more with a little time. Have fun !!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Derocher on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 10:35 pm:

Don, I don't know if you ever used the clear Rustbullet? If it is as tough as the one that you are using it might be a great substitute for varnish. Any thoughts? I see amazon has a qt. for about 44 bucks. I might try puttin a qt in the wifes shopping cart....JD


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Saggese on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 11:49 pm:

Do you do any other preparation between the polycarbide abrasive and spraying the Rust Bullet?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 04:40 am:

Michael, I just wipe the entire surface down with Lacquer thinner and let dry. Then apply the Rustbullet and then do any feathering work (bondo). After sanding the bondo recoat those areas with Rustbullet again. This locks the bondo from the steel and the high build primer which will prevent it from absorbing moisture and becoming a problem down the road. So the end result is the bondo is sandwiched between the Rustbullet.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 04:30 am:

JD, I haven't used the Rustbullet clear coat product yet. They just came out with that about 2 years ago. I have used the Blackshell and it is one tough finish that can only be compared to powder coating. I applied it to the running boards and it has held up way beyond my expectations. I also used Blackshell on Ed's Fordor wire wheels and he says it hasn't chipped or failed in any way.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 04:53 am:

I've recently been getting quite a few questions about how I use Rustbullet on the T's. Keep in mind that I follow the instructions and videos found on their website. So for the sake of clarification and future reference, this is my method of the madness. This picture is of the 26 Tudor project I'm currently doing. I first remove all the paint, bondo and loose rust. I then do all the hammering and metal work such as patching and welding. And clean the patchwork up as good as possible. This picture shows the front fender after being patched where they typically have cracks from vibration.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 04:58 am:

The second step is to coat the entire fender with two coats of Rustbullet. Two coats if you use a foam brush or one heavy coat if sprayed. As you can see the rear fenders were really banged up. I hammered them out to get the original shape back. The balance act is to not hammer with too much force as to stretch the metal.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 05:06 am:

The next step is to apply the feathering agent. In my case I'm using "Icing", which I like because it seems to sand easily. The whole point and huge advantage of using Rustbullet is to isolate the "bondo" from the metal so it will not absorb moisture and create problems years down the road. After sanding and feathering the filler, I recoat (2 coats) the "bondo" and exposed metal with Rustbullet again. This will lock the "bondo" from absorbing moisture from the topside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 05:23 am:

I repeat the feathering and coating of rustbullet until I'm satisfied with the shape and surface. The piece is now ready for "High Build Primer". Rustbullet takes the place of epoxy primer, so no need to spend your money on it. This is the method I use for the entire car. I also paint the wood with Rustbullet to stabilize it. It is wood and still needs to breath or it will rot from within. I'm not going to say this is the right or best way to go while doing a restoration. It is up to each restorer to decide that. This method is a option which I find has advantages. The big advantage to me is it eliminates the need to sand/media blast the metal. Which means there is no threat of damaging the metal or warping due to a bad sand blasting job. It should be noted that the rustbullet on the two Fordors I have done actually filled the top wood nail holes completely to the point they could not be located afterwards. I actually had to drill new nail holes in. So it works great on heavy rusted metal with pin holes and it will fill most of the smaller pits in. I don't have any connection with Rustbullet other than being a customer but for our hobby it is about the best thing I have found and makes life much easier. The thought of doing all the work to restore a car and a few years down the road the bondo rears its ugly head and starts to undo all your labors, well this will hopefully eliminate that from happening.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Joseph A. Stearns on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 09:35 am:

Don, thanks for the update and story on how you do it. Sure looks good. You are faster that a speeding Model T !!!! Have fun. Joe


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 10:07 am:

Thanks for the tutorial, Don.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 11:18 am:

I would really like to get some feedback from all those trying it out. Good or bad it would serve quite a few forum members. I realize I have hyped it up for a few years now and I appreciate those willing to give it a try. A few years back a forum member (MG Restoration) stated "Its the best product for our hobby" and I agree. I can only hope others do also. So, Mike, Joe, Tom, Marv and Mark please tell us what you think when you get a chance. Thank you!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 09:15 am:

This is a picture of the radiator apron on this Tudor. I have not seen this on a apron before is this original?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 10:15 am:

That Thimble is really bent up.I have straightened out a few myself.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 10:52 am:

Some good pictures here, click on each small pic to bring up a larger version:

https://www.modeltford.com/item/3977EBQ.aspx

:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 11:03 am:

Thanks Mark, another surprise for me....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Wednesday, November 25, 2015 - 11:06 am:

Here is what that thimble should look like on the '24-'25 apron.



'24-'25 apron


'26-'27 apron w/ hole for round head screw and washer to keep the apron on the late engine/spring clamp mount with the threaded boss.

Subtle differences between the '24-'25 apron p/n 3977 and the '26-27 p/n 3977E apron.


Missing thimble on 3977E


Replacement thimble and replica one


Installed on Improved Car


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, December 01, 2015 - 10:09 am:

Thanks Dan, I've straightened this one out. Still have to do a couple spot welds on it but I think it will be just fine. Thanks for the information...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Butch Reif on Friday, December 04, 2015 - 09:28 pm:

Very nice car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Saturday, December 05, 2015 - 09:29 am:

It isn't bad Butch, but there is one thing that tends to bother me about this car. One might think it has a "curse". The original owner had the car for a few years and rebuilt the engine and drivetrain. He then decided he was going to restore it and bought a interior kit, top kit and several smalls to do the entire car. He just started on the project and died suddenly. His bother took on the project and before he could get anywhere on it he died unexpectedly. So it went back to the original owners daughter who wanted to have it restored, she died shortly after arranging a restorer for it. So, I'm hoping I'm ok because I don't own it...but it makes one wonder just what is the history of this old tudor???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Saturday, December 05, 2015 - 07:28 pm:

I hope this curse is not contagious!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Saturday, December 05, 2015 - 09:16 pm:

Not to beat a dead horse, but Phillips-head screws were invented in the '30's. No model T ever had any from the factory. One of the first things that I did to my '27 touring was to purge it of the half-dozen or so Phillips-head screws that I found in it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Sunday, December 06, 2015 - 05:04 am:

John the plaque has been removed along with the Phillips head screws. I'm planning to use correct nuts and bolts and screws everywhere. That was the only problem with this restore, they were all missing and what was there were incorrect. Fun stuff ~


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