Old Photo Postcard - Early Brass Era Touring With A Grand Set Of Wheels

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo Postcard - Early Brass Era Touring With A Grand Set Of Wheels
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 11:33 am:

Kinda Look Like Solid Rubber Circus wheels?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 02:12 pm:

Is that a chain-drive sprocket on the LF wheel ???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Hallett on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 02:47 pm:

It would appear that there is a steel ring of bolts on all four wheels. If you look closely at either front wheels you can see day light between the intersection of any two spokes and the ring. Also if you look closely at the left front wheel you can see some type of band around each spoke.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 03:41 pm:

Those wheels have a spring inside each spoke. I have seen one - never a full set.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 06:16 pm:

It could have been a smooth ride.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 07:21 pm:

I wonder what they were thinking when that wheel was designed? The internal spring idea may have merit taking some of the shock load on rough roads, but the spokes do not act alone. If one is compressed, those next to it need to move also, and the ones opposite need to extend. That would all be OK if things all move in the same plane, rather than radially, as they do. Without slop in the tubes or some way the spokes can pivot at the hub, the whole thing will be trying to tear itself apart.

Have I missed something?
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 07:27 pm:

Smooth, but noisy. I bet they clacked worse than a set of loose wood spoked metal felloe wheels!

Really interesting, cool wheels!

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Schedler, Sacramento on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 07:41 pm:

Maybe 2 springs...one on top and one on the bottom... What about dirt and water


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 10:20 pm:

Seems to me that someone attempted to make flat tires a thing of the past while maintaining ride quality.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 10:44 pm:

Royce can you tell s about the wheel you saw?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 11:17 pm:

Maybe this is obvious, as nobody has mentioned it, but altho' it's hard to tell for sure by the picture, I don't think there is any kind of tire on those wheels; I think it is all steel (or iron). Whatever the case, interesting for sure!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Phil Lawrence - Nevada City, CA on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 12:38 am:

That is a great photo of a 1911 touring, the car looks like a new car. Notice that the front doors are of the style that are more commonly seen on the smooth sided 1912 touring. The touring shown has the dashboard and filler board for the windshield typical of a 1911. The 1911 style body used front door panels that typically dipped down to the lower dash to clear the windshield filler board. The 1912 dashboard was taller and used the style of front door panel as shown that was straight without the dip. Both the 1911 and 1912 front door panels were detachable so I guess that anything is possible

Also clearly shown is the correct stripe detail on the hood, something that is rarely seen on restored 1909-1912 cars today. The windshield looks like a 1912. If you look closely at the top of the windshield support rods you will see the small tabs with holes at the hinges on both sides of the car for the shorter 1912 style top straps to hook on to however this car uses the longer top straps that run down to the radiator, again typical of a 1911.

That fellow sure looks proud of those wheels kinda makes you wonder what the heck he was thinking of.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 12:50 am:

I presume the tires are solid rubber. I see no valve stem.

The car is a very early 1912. It has the 1911 style step-side body, with straight top fore-doors, yet it has the two-piece dash and 1911 windshield. Note the car has the top straps come down to the front fender bracket (1911 style), yet it had the eyes for the top straps at the windshield hinge (1912 style).

Excellent example of pin striping.

Thanks for posting the picture, Jay.

: ^ )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 10:49 am:

Those are hideous looking wheels.

The license plate looks like Kentucky, 1921. Nice shape for an old car. The guy seems a bit over dressed. I wonder if he's a juice runner.


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