Old Photo - 1915 Rural Street Scene

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - 1915 Rural Street Scene
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 11:40 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 03:54 pm:

you have the Horse and buggy, The trolley tracks, and the Model T in this picture. Only 100 years ago. Things have sure changed, haven't they?

Notice also the open wire telephone lines on the multiple crossarms. That is how they did it before the cables.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 05:01 pm:

That is one cool picture! Keep 'em coming Jay!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Matheny on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 05:20 pm:

Love the photo, thanks Jay


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 05:29 pm:

Actually, Norm, what you see there is likely power. You can tell by the size and shape of
the insulators. Telephone was much smaller and without the flared skirts. However, I temper
my comment with the possibility that this is Postal Telegraph, as they liked the six pin arms
as well. The construction style is also classic early power transmission (note lack of any
transformers to indicate distribution). The pole at far right is power distro.

The bunched up wires down low, without insulators is some sort of early aerial telephone
cable. Looks too heavy for single twisted pairs, but the detail is too fuzzy to say for sure.

Hiding in the darkness of the far left are the RR telegraph/signal lines.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 06:05 pm:

Sad that public transportation was better a century ago then now. The street that I live on had trolley cars in 1915. Not even bus service today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 06:39 pm:

I see the signs of our trolley system (removed with a fanfare burning
of the trolley cars at Nat Park in 1939) all over town and love to pour
over old photos of the period showing how widespread this form of
public transport was.

But something happened. When I was a kid, the bus system was large
(Seattle area) but riding it was a bit sketchy. I never had problems, but
a fair number of the riders were wheezers and those unfamiliar with soap.

The bus system in Spokane is lightly used, and the terminal is a great
place to score illicit drugs or hook up for some man-on-man lovin' in the
rest room. Who the hell wants to use public transport unless they absolutely
have to ?

WTF happened to America ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Horlick in Penn Valley, CA on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 07:24 pm:

Was this taken in Pennsylvania? Looks like the Brass on that T has been painted black... all except the right sidelight font.

TH


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Sunday, October 04, 2015 - 07:44 pm:

I retired from Pacific Telephone and I recognize the cross arms. They would not have used that many circuits for electric power. The arms would also have been spaced farther apart for electric power. Notice also the wood pins below the cross arms? There was one circuit on those pins and three circuits on each of the cross arms. Could have been telegraph or telephone. Most likely telephone because the telegraph would not have used multiple circuits. Even with 10 circuits, those were probably party lines.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 01:19 am:

Roger that. I would still contend that 1900-1910 power construction looked very
much like this. Here is a shot I captured in Butte, MT. showing this same early set
up on the two upper arm ... basically two delta circuits on a single arm.


1910 vintage phone had graduated to 10 pin arms on all AM TEL lines, but were still
using CD 121 toll insulators on Long Lines and 102/106 kind of ponies on distro on
construction as seen here:



The bell-shaped insulators such as the CD 152 and 154 did not become Western Electric
standards until 1912 and 1921 respectively. By the time they were developed, 24 years
had passed since Ma Bell had ordered the upgrading of all lines to their standard 10 pin
arm design.

Western Union would join the move to standard 10 pin arms in 1910 and most of their lines
were upgraded by 1920. Only Postal stuck with six-pin arms until they were absorbed by
WU in 1943. Independents would be the only wild card that I can think of for phone, but this
line looks too "standard" for the typical independents.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration