1927 Sedan Top Weatherstripping Question

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: 1927 Sedan Top Weatherstripping Question
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 02:09 pm:

When I pulled off the top wood on my 1927 Canadian Tudor last week, there was a layer of hardened rubber between it and the body. I would guess that it was no more than a 1/16 think and went around the perimeter of the car, with the exception of the door opening. I couldn't find it in Lang's catalog and, when I called today, the ladies didn't know either. Is this something the vendors sell or will I have to find it at the hardware store? Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Harper - Keene, NH on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 02:19 pm:

Hi Jim,

Could that rubber be a Canadian only feature?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 03:31 pm:

It could be, Bill. I am hoping that more guys chime in who have rebuilt their tops and perhaps answer this question.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 04:41 pm:

I once replaced a top on a '27 two door sedan. It had the remnants of a tar paper-like material between the wood rails and the top material, on the sides where the rain gutters attached.

It was also a Canadian-built car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 05:23 pm:

Mike:

I would concur; however, this stuff was thicker than tar paper. There were also paper strips on top of the wood, as well. What did you replace it with or did you?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Spaziano, Bellflower, CA. on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 05:37 pm:

I did not replace it.

I simply stretched a piece of unbleached muslin cotton material over the wood as a foundation, covered that with upholstery cotton, and then covered the cotton with the top material.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 07:02 pm:

I've sealed the perimeter with Loctite PL-S30 roof flashing sealant on the closed cars top wood. It cures to a rubber like substance and can be cut with a razor blade. It will adhere to just about anything and isn't pricey, plus it cleans up good with mineral spirits. It still allows for plenty of flexing and remains attached to metal and wood. Just FYI..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 09:02 pm:

Don:

It sounds perfect. Where did you get it? Did you put it on with the wood or separately? Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Kelsey on Monday, October 05, 2015 - 09:36 pm:

Don:

It sounds perfect. Where did you get it? Did you put it on with the wood or separately? Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Patrick on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 - 02:50 am:

I'll bet "The Right Stuff" black rubber gasket sealant would work. It has the consistency of and spreads smoothly like cake icing and cures into a waterproof rubber. I have used it to make original looking rubber feet for my Edison and Victor phonographs where the old rubber feet hardened like rock. Jim Patrick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 - 04:41 am:

Jim it can be found at Home Depot, Menards, Lowes and just about any lumber yard. Good stuff, I also run a small bead of it under the cobra grain as it gets tacked down. I do this to prevent water from wicking up and also to provide a bit more holding power on the soft top.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 - 07:08 am:

I always laid a thick bead on the inside edge of the metal. Then put the wood down and made sure the sealant squeezed out all the way around the top. I then took mineral spirits and a putty knife to clean up the excess and smooth it out for a water tight seal. Allow it to dry overnight and you have about a good of seal as you can get.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 - 06:11 pm:

Don, do you treat the wood with anything before you install it? Boiled linseed oil, water seal, etc. I'm gathering up supplies to replace the top wood and covering on my '25 coupe. You have given me some good ideas, keep them coming! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 - 06:28 pm:

Hi David, I've been sealing it with "Rustbullet". Yup, the same "Rustbullet" you'd use on the metal. The reason is it seals the wood as good as any other kind of sealer on the market. Now as far as the top wood against the metal goes...I use the Loctite PL-S30 on the bare wood laid down on Rustbullet painted metal. I then seal the wood and the PL-S30 with Rustbullet. This allows the best adhesion to the wood and by sealing over wood and PL-S30 it will lock it all together. It is just my way of doing it but I have yet to have any failures of the seal or any water damage to the headliner or inside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 - 06:36 pm:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 - 11:00 pm:

For the record when I replaced the entire original top on my '27 Tudor there was nothing under the top wood framework.
If for no other reason I'd PUT something there to help prevent squeaks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, October 06, 2015 - 11:34 pm:

Thanks Don! Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, October 07, 2015 - 02:24 am:

Don, which one of the Rustbullet products do you use? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 07, 2015 - 05:36 am:

I use the grey automotive Rustbullet. I also use the Blackshell in combination with the automotive. The Blackshell I use on the undercarriage and also on the running boards. It is very tough and may be equal to powder coating.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 07, 2015 - 05:46 am:

A good test of the Automotive gray and Blackshell was done on Ed Baudoux's Fordor. We used them on his wire wheels. Ed has driven his car down many gravel roads and in all kinds of weather. So far no chips or any sign of failure anywhere. My Fordor running boards I did almost 5 years ago and there are no signs scratching, chips or wear anywhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 07, 2015 - 06:05 am:

I used the PL-S30 under the top wood, cobra grain, rain gutters and hide-um. As you can see in this picture I still had some cleaning up to do. But it sealed the entire top up and any left over didn't show on the cobra grain.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, October 07, 2015 - 03:02 pm:

Thanks again Don. This is all uncharted territory for me. The top on my coupe had been replaced in the early sixties on the original wood. It wasn't sealed and the wood rotted all around the outside. It's a shame that original wood was destroyed.I think the rest is OK. Where do you get the Rustbullet? Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Wednesday, October 07, 2015 - 03:20 pm:

www.rustbullet.com or Summit Racing website sells it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Thursday, October 08, 2015 - 06:14 am:

David, I have the dimensions of the top wood. I made the top wood in the picture above. The total cost of the ash was around $65.00 or so. You can PM me if you need any help or information. That is a '26 Coupe roof.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, October 08, 2015 - 03:50 pm:

Thanks Don, I'll keep that in mind. I have the '25 coupe wood drawings coming from Ron Buckley and I think I found a place to get the ash lumber(Baird Hardwoods) once I receive the plans and know what sizes I will need. I really enjoy your posts, keep 'em coming! Dave


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