Attaching crankcase to engine block

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Attaching crankcase to engine block
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By arnie johansen on Wednesday, October 07, 2015 - 08:05 pm:

On page 87 figure 213 of the Model T Ford Service book, two cap screws are labeled "A". I do not seem to see any lock washer listed for these bolts.
Is it acceptable to place split lock washers under these bolt heads?

On another note I measured the bolts that are a majority used to mount the crankcase to the engine and they are about 1.175 long with a .290 hex head height, and the cotter pin hole is about 1 inch from the bottom of the hex head. Are these the correct fasteners for the engine to crankcase mounting in the majority of places?

Also on the front cover there are some screws that thread into the engine but appear not to have lock washers. Is it acceptable to place lock washers under the heads of these bolts?

As you can see, I am concerned about bolts shaking loose. Perhaps that should not be a concern, but some Model T's tend to vibrate some!

Thanks,

Arnie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Wednesday, October 07, 2015 - 10:19 pm:

Lock washers don't change things much, so go ahead and use them. Your biggest concern now is alignment. Only place the two front bolts through the front cover to the crankcase loosely. Then place you ball cap on the transmission and put the two lower cap screws in loosely. The will align your crankcase automatically, providing your crankcase is straight to begin with. It's always a good idea to have your crankcase checked on a KRW crankcase straightening fixture. I failed to mention you must attach the front cover to the block to do this.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Friday, October 09, 2015 - 09:43 am:

Arnie

I remember reading somewhere that Ford never used a lockwasher on a model T. All nuts that he felt needed securing were done with cotter pins.

If I'm wrong, someone correct me please.

That said, nothing wrong with using them if they make you feel something needs a little extra securing. I use them in a few select places on my 15.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, October 09, 2015 - 10:32 am:

Bud, Ford changed practice during the 19 years of Model T production. Lock washers were used instead of cotter pins for the crankcase bolts from december 1924, but the bolts still had holes and castle nuts were still used, maybe to be able to use the same style nuts and bolts in many assembly stations?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bud Holzschuh - Panama City, FL on Friday, October 09, 2015 - 09:09 pm:

Thanks Roger - I learn something new every day ;o)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Friday, October 09, 2015 - 09:46 pm:

I have found out years ago that using a ball cap with two bolts to align the pan, does nothing.

When you put all the bolts in the block part of the pan, the pan will be pulled to the same position every time you do that, it can't help to be with all those bolts.

If it is a bent pan, it will be off. If it is a straight pan, it will be right, and a ball cap will no way put a pan in a straight position.

The only way I could see that a ball cap helped is if you had the engine on its nose and you were putting the pan bolts in and not have the pan fall and hit you in the head.

I always mount the pan when the block pan rails are up, and that can be done with out effort.

They always come out straight, if the pan is straight.

Herm.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 08:13 am:

I agree that pan can be mounted with the block upside down. It helps to have the block on an engine stand which can be rotated so the block is right side up, upside down, or on end. I put in the front two bolts loosly and then the universal joint socket (4th main) Next start all the bolts in the block. The 4th main will keep the rear of the crankcase centered over the transmission. However if the crankcase is bent in an up and down direction, it will not keep it straight with the engine in that direction. After I get the crankcase bolted to the engine, I rotate it right side up and install the hogs head. Then put it nose down and the 4th main should slip on easy and move up and down on the bolts. Tighten all bolts starting in the center of each side and work toward the front and back. If the 4th main still moves back and forth easily it is ready to install in the car.

It will save you a lot of trouble if you have access to a KRW pan straightener to check and or straighten it before installing and then having to take it off to straighten it later.
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 01:11 pm:

I used lock washers on all the pan to block/transmission except the bottom two 4th main on my 21. I found the recess machined in the block for the nut just fits the lock washers. I have found that after running a while many of the nuts on the bolts need to be checked and re-snugged up, would be a real pain to remove all the cotter pins to take up the slack.


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