Local Town's 250th Anniversary Parade

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Local Town's 250th Anniversary Parade
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 02:03 pm:

Today was the 250th anniversary of the founding of Linglestown, Pennsylvania; a small town just over the mountain from where I grew up. For reference, it is located just about 15 minutes from where the antique auto show takes place in Hershey. It is an example of the great small towns that still can be found if you look in the right places.

I drove the Model T in the parade and it performed wonderfully.


The main street through town, year unknown.


The same street today (opposite direction), with a view of my T from the windshield of my brothers '54 Chevy.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ken Kopsky, Lytle TX on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 02:27 pm:

Looks like a fun day. 250 years? That's quite young for town in the Northeast US. Does that include "settlement" time? I was curious about San Antonio's start and found out it's over 320 years old. Most tie the start to around the battle of the Alamo in 1836 but it was around for 145 years by then. But Lytle has been around for a short 133 years.

I'm fascinated by local history. There were many Indian battles in this area and Northwest of here. It's not uncommon to still find arrowheads around the creeks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dave Wells, Hamilton Ontario on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 09:13 pm:

The car looks great Dan. I'm sure you really made the parade as Model Ts always do.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 09:28 am:

Another neat historical photo. And a nice car Dan.

Is it me, or does it seem like the majority of old photos of towns seem to be taken when the leaves are off the trees?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 10:59 am:

Tim,

Here is a link to 3500 street photos from 1880-1940.

http://www.insulators.info/pictures/?op=list&folder=57

You are right, many are taken with the leaves off the trees. Probably to show the town
better. But many have the background obscured by big, leafy trees.

Being originally from the Seattle area, I was always taken by how "it never rained" back
in the old days (based on old photos of the area). It's a place that gets 600+ days of rain a
year !!! Judging by old photos, it might as well have been Wells, Nevada (only with a lot of
greenery) !!!

With all this talk these days about "global warming", I think the photographic evidence
you point out shows we came from a period of perpetual winter (supporting the global
warming theory) and the photos I am talking about show a serious increase in climate
change as well .... from lots of nice sunny days to 600 days of rain a year ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 11:01 am:

Has anyone else noticed how damned ugly we have collectively made our streetscapes since "back in the day" ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 01:01 pm:

Thanks all for the compliments.

The history listed on Wikipedia seems to conform with several other accounts.

"In 1765, Thomas Lingle purchased a parcel of land in what was then "Paxton Township," so as to develop a 90-plot living, working, and studying community for newly-arriving European settlers. He called his new settlement "The Town of St. Thomas," after his namesake "St. Thomas," the Christian Apostle. The sheepskin document on which he drew the plan for his village still exists, showing in great detail the village's name, each of the plots, their plot numbers, and all street and alley names. The county deed recorder's seal and record information is visible on the bottom left corner of the document.

In 1811, Mr. Lingle died and was buried in the Wenrich's Church cemetery (now St. Thomas UCC), at the east end of the village. Soon thereafter, village and area residentes began calling his village "Lingle's town," and the name soon took on its current name, Linglestown."


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