Radiator Lower Tube?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Radiator Lower Tube?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 04:19 pm:

Not sure of the nomenclature, but the lower nipple on my radiator is missing a piece. Can I use it as-is? Is there a piece I could solder on to repair it? I think it's been repaired in the past. The base is iron and the end is brass.

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 04:35 pm:

You might get away with it, but I'd start saving up for a new Berg's.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 05:00 pm:

I think you can get away with it. Just use a liberal amount of black silicon to help the hose seal to the rough surface.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 05:12 pm:

As Fred said, liberal silicone seal, then run the hose up against the tank. Rather than put the clamp on the ridge put it on the smooth section closer to the tank. Too far gone to clean to bare iron as you would have to do to solder or braze.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 05:27 pm:

Thanks for the tips.

Phil


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 06:18 pm:

I'll go along with Hal. Radiators are not the place to try to save money. My T has a Berg's flat-tube and you can't make it overheat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 06:55 pm:

I don't know what is wrong with people in this hobby...where are the skills to repair? Just like the rest of the populace...if it is broke, buy a new one. A disposal society.
Anyway, there are many ways to resolve that problem as described by other members in this thread.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Verne Shirk on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 07:28 pm:

I guess I have other things that I would like to spend my money on than a new radiator. I have repaired the original on my daughter's '14 Touring by brazing the cast inlet and outlet several times. I use some donor pieces. Lay the radiator flat and fill it with water all except what you need to braze. I use an oxy/acetylene torch to braze with. By the way, we lost the grease cup/nut on that car today. I took the fan off and completed the final 100 miles of today's run without a fan. The fan isn't really needed as long as you don't let it idle for a long time. It never boiled without the fan, using an original radiator.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 07:39 pm:

The best solution is a new bottom outlet. The new replacements are brass. They can be fitted without removing the bottom tank.

I would not use silicone when there is no full shoulder on the outlet. Silicone will fill rust voids, but it also acts as a lubricant, and when the clamp is tightened it can squeeze the hose off the outlet without the full shoulder. My sealant of choice on hoses is Permatex no2 gasket cement.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Val Soupios on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 07:40 pm:

The one on my '27 was a lot worse than yours but the radiator cooled nicely so I wanted to save it. I took a piece of copper that I shaped to insert into what was left of the lower radiator connection so that it replaced the missing part and then I epoxied over it with Devcon so it was exactly the same thickness as the original connection. I ran with that for 3 years until I got a new radiator from Bergs and then I gave it to a guy who needed a radiator and he is still running it without a problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Eyssen - Abilene TX on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 09:48 pm:

Insert a thin sleeve, and slather on Lab Metal or JB Weld in layers and smooth after hardening. Leave the sleeve in place.( Similar to Val's solution.) Did it and still holding.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John T. Tannehill III, Hot Coffee, MS on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 01:07 am:

If you have a sacrifice radiator that has a good intake or as stated above buy a new intake! a competent radiator shop can easily repair that.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 07:44 am:

The fix it vs. replacement is a topic I take issue with. Not everyone has the skills or tools to fix an item--I like buying stuff like that cheap. Those that can fix things I give kudo's to. I have also seen "fixes" that were better left to die in a scrap pile. I try to fix as much as my ability and tools will allow, But I have almost no experiences with radiators. I more than likely would buy a new bottom outlet and have a shop put it on, although the sleeving idea is a good one too.

Your own experience should tell you (not someone here or elsewhere telling you) when to say when before you attempt a fix, have something fixed for you, or just replace an item. The other side of the coin is you'll never gain experience if you don't try (but consider my second sentence in the first paragraph).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 08:16 am:

Maybe you could find a bad radiator with a good lower connection and replace it I have done that on later radiators that are "Zero" pressure and have gotten good service from them. If you try that route keep the heat as localized as possible to avoid damaging the lower tank. JMHO :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 08:55 am:

Chad,
I suppose that if one has enough money it is a lot easier to buy replacement parts and hire labor for repairs. Historically model T owners were resourceful…and did not have much money. However when I started with Ts 65 years ago there weren’t available replacement (repro) parts …only junk yard stuff. And I had no money. So I had to learn how to repair and restore. Admittedly, today it is a different story. Replacement parts abound and there are all sorts of repair sources. So the issue still exists…fix it or replace it….or get somebody else to do it. Perhaps more T owners should experiment, research and learn to DIY. John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 09:03 am:

If the radiator still does a good job of cooling then I would try to repair it.
I think Val S. has the right idea.
Get a piece of copper pipe the right size to make an insert.
You could get a short piece from an Air Conditioning supply house. Looks to be about 1 1/2" ID.

Clean the cast iron as best as you can, slip in the insert and use J-B Weld to form the missing top material.

It might last longer than you think.


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