Your Hershey Haul (post a pic)

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Your Hershey Haul (post a pic)
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 08:21 pm:

Well, it was another great year at Hershey. The weather could not have been better Tuesday - Friday AM. I was able to see and meet some T friends from this forum and spend quality time with my Dad walking the fields like we've done for many years.

So what T stuff did you come home with? I was looking for T accessories again this year and did pretty good.

I found this fairly complete air friction carburetor (one of several I spotted during the week) at one stand, and found the more elusive hot air pipe at another. Ended up with a pretty neat display piece.



Also found this Ever Ready Auto Vaccuum with original instructions. Does anyone have more info on this item?





Most importantly, I hope everyone got home safely!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bruce Compton on Saturday, October 10, 2015 - 11:50 pm:

Hi Dan : Glad you are happy with the Air Friction pipe you got from me at Hershey. There is a very nice A.F. carb on ebay right now. We left around 3:00 pm Friday just before the downpour, and arrived home safe and sound. Hope you did too. Cheers : Bruce


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 01:44 am:

Two hundred twenty five rebuildable Model T Ford ignition coils.
1
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Deichmann, Blistrup, Denmark on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 05:12 am:

Impressive Ron, that you can keep finding so many. Around here you see sometimes just one or two and then people think they are worth their weight in gold.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 07:56 am:

That's for sure. I was at an Antique shop and they wanted $35.00 for one and I asked if it worked and he said he didn't know. Probably not. It was rough looking.
RDW


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 08:27 am:

Over the past 3 years, I have set my sights on stocking up on wearable items. My goal is to assemble enough parts so that when I retire (which according to my current plan is within the next 5 years) I will have in my possession the parts that I need to keep my T's running without having any big expenses. So, naturally, bearings are the big thing as well as timers, bushings and bands. I have been buying anything mechanical that can fail and been making sure I buy correct replacements for each of the cars I have. The fun of the search is to find them in NOS condition. The pic here is what I found this year, along with a few other miscellaneous items decided to pick up. Those front wheel bearing cups are getting hard to find in NOS condition....hershey haul


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 09:22 am:

Nice haul guys, especially all those coils! Let us not forget those boxes for the coils were made right in my backyard in Sandusky Ohio, the building of which they are slowly tearing down.

Glad to see the weather turned out so good. I remember Steve's earlier post showing doom and gloom cold and rain, and I mentioned how around here what they forecast a week out usually ends up turning out to be the exact opposite. Glad it did!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 11:12 am:

I found less than I ever have, but that doesn't matter. I see people from all over the USA that I know, and the weather was great, except for a brief thunder storm on Friday that lasted about 1/2 hour. I also got to meet Jim Lyons who posted above. We've been pen pals for a couple of years, and it was good to meet him. I certainly enjoyed the meet, and have already booked my room for next year.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, October 11, 2015 - 08:13 pm:

Larry.. It was a pleasure meeting you as well. Next year, come on down if you have the time and we can spend some time looking over the cars.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 07:34 am:

Dan B,
Restore that Air Friction carb and run it. They work well and are an interesting piece. You seem to have all the parts. There is a *hook* that goes around the exhaust manifold to support the air intake...through the hole. I have been running one for 40 years.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George Danek_ Salem, Mass on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 10:41 am:

Friday am only haul! Could not find any kids willing to haul parts around, Coker tire was able to help. Picked up parts in Chocolate fields, then RN rows to pickup block and back to day parking area, all before the weather front came thru. My groin still hurts! Only splash aprons and engine block were mine, remainder of parts for others.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 11:48 am:

I wish I would have grabbed a Coker wagon; I was one aisle over from them and didn't think. I was looking for a LH axle housing and ended with a complete axle minus driveshaft. It was cheap and had Hassler perches and swing arms.

My kid convinced me we could carry it together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 11:53 am:

Bruce - Glad to hear you had a safe trip back. The air pipe was a great find and I'm glad it was preserved long enough to be reunited with the proper carbuerator.

James - Nice job and I appreciate you sharing your strategy. That's one I'm going to adopt next year. Very smart.

John - I admit that I am curious as to how it would perform. There seem to be many of them still out there, so I'm assuming they were quite popular at the time. If you have the ability to post a picture of your setup, I would be quite interested in seeing it.

Here is an advertisement I found last night in a 1923 Ford Owner and Dealer Magazine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 01:07 pm:

Sure was a fun again Hershey! Weather was wonderful, that quick rain storm on Fri afternoon blew away and cooled down the place. Wed and Thur had to wear short pants, sunny and lots to do and see.

So here are my 'treasures' from the hunt, checked my iPhone Health Dashboard (carry your cell phone in the pocket and each step is recorded)and 'distance in miles' traveled is displayed. On the 6th 4.82 mi.; 7th 8.08 mi.; 8th 6.29 mi. and on the 9th 4.11 mi...... for a total of over 23 miles hiking around those fields at Hershey!

You have to hunt to find your treasures :-)


Bosch front plate unit, with both gears $40 was a steal...he he. Nice ditch lamps, $20 ea, NOS small parts, shackles, brake rod brackets, low speed screw, windshield top clamp, a jack handle $5, pair of nice headlamp buckets, one with a real nice nickel shell for $20, belly pan strap for $30, and the oil lamp font in one of those $1 piles!



The tail lamp and license bracket for '24-'27 was real good find, just about NOS for $20.



But have to say the 'favorite' was the mini oil check gauge. Shorty handle to easy fit on the petcock, my arms are long enough to get there with this shorty, as those long handled ones wobble in my shaky hand and are hard to fit to the petcock....this one is fine :-)


Plus good sheet metal, NOS pieces, plus the real nice driver's side commercial '17-'23 low hood fender for the depot hack project. Already had the passenger side in this same condition.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 02:33 pm:

AAUGH!!!! There is NO such thing as a "Commercial Fender" !!!
How long will this mis-information go on???
(Why do I feel like Don Quixote?)
:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 02:47 pm:

Great haul, Dan, It's your fender, so you can call it whatever you like :-) Besides, it's the most commonly understood term.
So you're building a depot hack too, besides the Wanderwell replica?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 02:54 pm:

David its a sort-kinda half truth like a Doctor's Coupe!

I have a 24 Doctors?? Coupe with commercial?? front fenders!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John McGinnis in San Jose area, CA. on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 03:39 pm:

Dan B,
Here is a pic of the installation of the Air Friction carb. It is nothing special except for the attachment of the hot air inlet arrangement. There is a *hook* made of 1/4" steel rod with a threaded end...which hooks around the exhaust manifold and secured by a nut at the hole in the inlet casting.
TT engine


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 04:12 pm:

Dan, you are right, you have to do the leg work, be fast, and get up early to find the good stuff. Oh I forgot, and "dig deep" in the piles and boxes. Nice haul, I was not there again, but someday. On my bucket list of things to do. But I do plan on being at Chickasha, to give you some friendly competition :-) Donnie Brown ....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 06:06 pm:

John, I hadn't thought of it like that, but then I don't have a Dr.s Coupe--but I do have a Dr.s roadster! :-)
Dan, I forgot to mention, that is a GREAT haul; Hershey is on my "bucket List" I hope someday to go (and then follow it up with the York toy train meet the following weekend).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 06:32 pm:

Beautiful, thank you for the picture John.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jeff V on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 06:58 pm:

David,
I struggle with the 'commercial' fender misnomer, however, when I say "commercial fender" everyone knows exactly what fender I'm talking about as opposed to saying "that fender with the straight bead as apposed to the one with the dogleg around the splash apron", then have someone say "you mean the commercial fender?". It's a decent shorthand even though I know it's technically wrong.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 08:57 pm:

David

So instead of "that word", will use with Jeff says, "'24-'25 front fender with the wide bead to the inside edge"

.....and for the '17-'23 low hood cars, "front fender with the wide bead to the inside edge, without the lip for the high radiator apron T's" :-)





But wait, these fenders are found on TT's so maybe "that word" is OK ?




And Roger...yep working on a depot hack project too, so finding parts for it. Chassis first, so will have a place in the garage to stack the hack body!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 10:18 pm:

After years of searching, I was finally able to pick up a half-dish, two-mattress dog bed, with wet insulation. Even came with the dog ! :-)



Another item I have been after for a long time was a power sledgehammer. The manual ones really wear a guy out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 09:27 am:

Dan,

That "mini oil check gauge" is actually a radiator lower petcock opener - yours is missing the piece that bolts to one of the fender iron bolts - I'll try and get a photo of mine later today.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 10:00 am:

Steve

Realized that when cleaning it up, tried it on the radiator petcock. Works good. So will try to mount it on the T.



This one is home made, but have seen adv for commercial version.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 11:34 am:

Of minor significance as Hershey finds go, but interesting nonetheless.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 11:38 am:

I am interested R. V. Now what is it?

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Andy Loso St Joseph, MN on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 12:03 pm:

Stapler


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 02:20 pm:

It must be a Model A stapler, since it has the Ford logo in an oval. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 02:27 pm:

NOW I know why I find petcocks with a hole drilled in the handle! I wondered what that was about.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 05:34 pm:

David D, A lot of earlier cars, like large one and two cylinder motors that had to be hand cranked, used a "compression release" to make cranking easier. The petcock used by Ford for so many years was exactly like the valves used for many of those compression release valves, except that those were often drilled for a handle to reach out where you could easily grab it and turn it to open and close for starting the engine.
The 1910 Fuller I used to have had those. It had a two cylinder Davis engine mounted cross-ways in the chassis like a Maxwell engine was mounted. On each side of the radiator, at the bottom, was a little "L" shaped steel wire handle. You were supposed to turn those handles 90 degrees to open the valves make cranking easier. After the engine has started, it whistles and pops loudly, then turn both handles to close the valves. Many, many, such cars used the same little valve, only with a hole in the handle for the handle extension handle.
More detail. Some of those compression release valves had smaller handles, barely large enough for the hole for the extension handle. I have seen enough original engines with the larger handle like a model T used to absolutely believe they were both types used originally. I have seen and have enough with the larger handle also to support this idea. A valve with the small handle with the hole would have been originally intended for some sort of remote release, whether compression or cooling system water or other. Larger handled valves with a hole drilled in them could be either drilled later for replacement of damaged valves, or after-market change, or have been drilled originally for similar use.

End thread drift.
Continue Hershey score reports.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 05:01 am:

RV


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 11:02 am:

Yeah, I do. What are you gonna do about it?

;<)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 12:13 pm:

You need to watch the movie :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 12:17 pm:

I think the last newly released film I saw was "Gone With The Wind." Or maybe it was "The Wizard of Oz."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Rosenthal in Cincinnati Oh on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 07:25 pm:

Hello RV:
Sent you a PM.
Thx,
Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Fuller on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 09:08 pm:

Here's my "Hershey Haul". May not be as exciting as everyone else's finds but I'm happy.








Hey Dan!
"Looks like somebody's got a case of the Monday's!"


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 09:12 pm:

Hi Ed - What's the tool at the bottom of the lower picture?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 09:44 pm:

Band clamp.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 09:51 pm:

It holds the band springs compressed on the shafts while you drop the cover in place. I have one; it took me awhile to figure out how it works but once I did, it sure made a snap of getting the cover back on. Now it's one of the easier jobs in an engine re-assembly. Nice find.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Fuller on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 10:14 pm:

Jack and R.V. beat me to it.

Yes, as R.V. said it squeezes the band ears together. I have been looking for a while and finally found this one. I actually walked away from it a couple times but I was fortunate that it was still there when I went back! That usually doesn't happen at Hershey.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 02:48 am:

ED: Better watch it, "You could get your a$$ kicked for saying something like that." :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 04:11 am:

I have one of those and didn't know what it was used for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Everett on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 07:16 am:

Dan, what movie is that?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 08:48 am:

Bill: Office Space


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 12:23 pm:

Actually, it doesn't squeeze the band ears together. That's what I thought for so long, and why I couldn't get it to work. It compresses the SPRINGS and holds them in place while you drop the cover on. Once I figured it out I was amazed at how it simplified the job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Hatch on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 01:56 pm:

RV: Try plastic Wire Tie Wraps. Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 03:29 pm:

I do use them around the band ears. With the ears held by the ties, the cover really does drop into place with the springs compressed and held by the tool. If I were tech savvy I'd make and post a video.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 03:52 pm:


OK, now that I've unloaded, here's mine. Early 1911 radiator; 10 coils (They tested Good) for $7.50 each; a new spare 30 x 3 tube; two rear hub pullers; 92 pages of accessory ads from teens issues of MoTor; scissors; points file; fifty ball bungees (they grow legs and walk off, like needle nose pliers); NOS spark plug cores; three X plugs; two ammeters; 1914-1915 oil cap; three petcocks; gas cap; hood clips (teens); coil box insulators & hardware; pair of Phillips bits; six clamps (they hide with the bungees and the pliers); tire irons; NOS differential case with a little surface rust; two bronze pre-starter Holley G bodies; sediment bulb parts to make a couple of good ones; five sheets of brass cloth; a couple of spare work lights; box of nuts, bolts, & other hardware ($1).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 09:58 pm:

Great haul, Steve.

One more item I forgot to mention. Picked up this drain pan. Only the second one I've ever seen. Finally did some research on it and found out that it was produced for the federal government by I. H. Lawson Co. for WWII Army jeeps. It was not stored on the jeep but issued by the motor pool when needed. 4 gal capacity, stamped Federal stock # 41-p-125 on the bottom.

Works great for draining the radiator. The screen keeps the antifreeze from splashing up all over the front end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dean Yoder, Iowa City IA. on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 10:25 pm:

21" TT wheel,ECCT. Eisman Mag tester, 26/27 rear coup/roadster fenders,2 TT tail light brackets . r


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration