Lesson of the day....

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Lesson of the day....
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William L Vanderburg on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 02:44 pm:

Do not move the timer and touch the spark plug wire to get a better spark while setting the timing. lol


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 02:59 pm:

It seems to bother some people more than others. I simply cannot stand to get shocked. I hate it and I'm careful not to (although it still happens occasionally). My grandfather, on the other hand, was one of these guys who would stick his pocket knife up into a spark plug wire boot and say "OK, turn it over. Yep, that one's gettin' fire".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 03:32 pm:

Dad used to tell me that my Uncle Jack (Dad's older brother) was not only a heck of a good mechanic, but Dad said that nobody that knew him would go anywhere near him while he was working on a car with the engine running. Dad said he'd grab a spark plug with one hand and reach out with his other hand and grab your hand. Apparently, the "jolt" never bothered him,......???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 04:09 pm:

I was fortunate? enough to have a Dad who was not bothered by spark. Maybe that's why it bothers me. He would lay his arm across the head of a flathead six to stall it out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donald Manlove on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 05:28 pm:

I started my T the other day after it sat outside for a few minutes. Turned on the coils, heard a terrible screech and a squirrel fell out from under the hood. Bet he doesn' t do that again.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Coco - Winchester Va. on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 05:38 pm:

My non-T 1910 Hupmobile (hey, it has Model T spider gears in rear end, a near perfect fit!) has a Bosch DU-4 magneto. I'd had it rebuilt, so was very hot,. Mounting it to car, I grabbed front end and turned shaft to make timing...YIKES! My left hand knew EXACTLY what my right had was doing!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 05:47 pm:

Remember, Magnetos can be even worse!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 06:17 pm:

When I was a light truck mechanic (Jeeps to 5 ton) in the Army we had a mechanic that would stand away from the truck and hold a spark plug wire in one hand and watch the spark jump from a finger on the other had to a mirror, windshield frame...whatever.
We always had to be careful walking by him when he had a motor running, he'd let a spark jump to the back of your ear as you'd walk by.
I've seen him grab all six wires at once on a straight six Chevvy staff car and kill the engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 07:43 pm:

Don, back when I was in high school I remember dad turning the key on the Buick, heard a thump, squawl (by then dad turned off the ignition) only to see our gray cat flying out from under the hood minus quite a bit of fur! He was laying on the fan in front of the engine keeping warm overnight. After that when we even walked toward the car if that cat was in the garage...zooom!- off he'd fly as far as he could! Feel sorry for your squirrel!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 07:59 pm:

Richard, that was worth waiting to download on dial up! ROFL!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Justin H. - Western PA on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 08:10 pm:

I used to work with a guy that would put a hot plug wire on a bee sting. He claimed that the shock neutralized the venom.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill dugger on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 09:03 pm:

I remember when we lived in South Central Missouri the older guy's would wire a coil somewhere in the care with a toggle switch and if you got near their car or came up to talk to them they would turn it on. If you did not have any idea what the noise was and took hold of the door handle you would get the shock of your life. You only did that once. When you saw that guy coming up close to you would stand clear or if the car had running boards you would jump on them so your one foot and one hand was not in contact with ground and the car.
Anyone that has happened to will know what I am talking about!!!!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 10:01 pm:

I have used electricity many times as a training tool for the neighborhood animals. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Martin Vowell, Sylmar, CA on Monday, October 12, 2015 - 10:23 pm:

Been there, done that, got the burn to prove it too. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 12:53 am:

I have been zapped so many times over the years. Not really crazy about it. But it doesn't bother me much either.
And yes Richard E and David D, I bought an external magneto at a swap meet once, walking around, carrying it, thoughtlessly spinning the armature----? Oh yes. The mag still had life in it. Richard E, I laugh out loud every time I see that picture!
I have been hit accidentally by running car's ignition several times over the years. And deliberately a few times for quick testing, or on a dare.
My dad knew an electrician that tested hot circuits by touching them as a daily way of doing his work. I have actually done that a few times. ---A WARNING TO FOLLOW!!--- I have done so on both 110 and 220 circuits, but prefer to usually use a meter for such tests.

WARNING coming up!

Electricity is funny stuff. IT CAN BE VERY DANGEROUS!!! Or not.
Automotive ignition is very HIGH VOLTAGE! But very low current (low amps) (also low Watts) (actually, to use the word "Watts" that way is a misstatement, but you get the point I hope). Generally, it may hurt? But probably won't do harmful damage. Lower voltages with higher currents can kill you. I have allowed myself to be shocked with 110 or 220 volt household type currents. But only under carefully controlled circumstances, and knowing HOW to touch the wires. Household currents can do serious (even fatal) harm, depending on circumstances. 110 is more dangerous than 220. 220 likely will blow you off. PROVIDED you survive the initial shock? You would likely recover just fine. Again, circumstances vary, but 110 has a nasty habit of causing fingers and hands to close (clamp) onto a wire and fry the person holding on. That is why we are taught to use a piece of dry wood or other insulated item to push or knock a person off of an electric shock. If you were to grab someone with your hands in an effort to pull them off, you also may be caught.
So, while allowing oneself to be bit by automotive ignition may sound crazy? Provided you do not have a (known or unknown) medical condition making you abnormally susceptible to harm from shock? Automotive ignition "probably" won't hurt you. But that doesn't mean that there aren't other sources of electric shock which could do to you serious harm.
One should always have a healthy respect for electricity. Although it can be fun to zap unsuspecting bystanders.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 02:07 am:

One of my exercises involved a kitty getting on and in my Dodge. Cats are tough to get because
they jump, and don't usually touch your electrical source AND ground to zap them. Dogs just walk
up and piss on the wheel ... You get a sure hit every time as they light up their privates ... Hehehehe !

.... but with Mr. Kitty, it took a long time of waiting and making sure the connections were good. Then
one day, it happened. That tell-tale screech of a cat and a blurred shot of something moving at light
speed with a curl of smoke trailing off.

I never saw Mr. Kitty around my cars again. I like that. Problem solved, ... problem STAYS solved. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John C Codman on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 10:15 am:

Please do be aware that some of the modern car ignition systems are capable of putting out significant amperage through the coil secondary windings. Being bit by a T or even a 1960s ignition system can be annoying, but some of the later, transistorized systems can ruin your day.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 01:19 pm:

220 is just t 110 wires and a ground so unless you are touching both it is only 110.
We taught A/C service and had a wise old fellow said he discharges run capacitors by wetting his finger tips and touching both terminals, he hasn't been right since doing it in a class with a large unit.
Be careful around any electricity.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Dillinger - Charlotte, MI on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 01:54 pm:

When I was 17, I touched the business end of the coil of my '79 Datsun 280ZX while the car was running. My hand clamped down so tight I couldn't let go and I screamed for my dad to help me and he threw one of those big old blue Motor manuals at my arm, knocking my hand free of the coil. My forearm was sore for several days, both from the electricity and the big bruise on the back of my arm where the manual drove it into the idle adjust screw on the air intake.

To this day, I'm still extremely careful around anything running, although I did once get a spark plug poke from my T. It wasn't nearly as painful as the Datsun coil.

(Message edited by zdillinger on October 13, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 02:00 pm:

I will admit to putting my tongue on 9v batteries to check them when we're in a performance at the theatre, and a mic battery needs changing AND the meter is upstairs & I'm downstairs. That's about as much risk as I care to take, although I have been known to work with hot house circuits, but very carefully and with insulated tools! In spite of my carefulness, I have blown a few breakers; so much for avoiding power interruption on that circuit!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 02:06 pm:

I will admit to putting my tongue on 9v batteries to check them when we're in a performance at the theatre, and a mic battery needs changing AND the meter is upstairs & I'm downstairs. That's about as much risk as I care to take, although I have been known to work with hot house circuits, but very carefully and with insulated tools! In spite of my carefulness, I have blown a few breakers; so much for avoiding power interruption on that circuit!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 02:07 pm:

Augh, dial-up interruption strikes again! Sorry!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Norman T. Kling on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 02:18 pm:

I used to work for the telephone company back in the days when they still had open wire leads which parallel the high voltage electric circuits. When a telephone is connected there is a hum on the line, but when there is nothing connected those wires pick up induced current from the parallel electric lines and can give you quite a kick. Anyway it's a good idea to be belted onto the pole whenever you touch those wires!
Norm


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Tuesday, October 13, 2015 - 04:46 pm:

Years back when the mechanical street sweepers had the Chrysler flathead 6 we'd all get a good laugh when Tony, one of the district mechanics, would stall the engine by putting his fingers on as many of the exposed plug wires as he could reach. The sparks would come out of his belt buckle and jump onto the fender.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 12:34 pm:

My dad ran a garage and we had a guy, when I was a kid, would check to see which cylinder was not firing by grabbing the spark plug. It was 6 volts then. When 12 volts came out, he grabbed ahold of the plug and that was the first time I heard him swear.
RDW


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 02:21 am:

The Army trucks had 24 volt systems.
you get the same shock no matter what the system is.
A coil only puts out enough current to ionize the gap.
if you hold the wire you get less shock than if you let it jump to you.


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