Question: On Coil Box Wood

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Question: On Coil Box Wood
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 07:39 am:

Did the early Ford coil box 13-14 use wood that was laminate or plywood? Or was it plank?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 07:40 am:

Looks like lumber to me, not glued plys.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary M. Wheeler on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 08:12 am:

When I restored my original coil box on my '14, Here's what I found:









almost appears like a thin laminate??

I replaced it with John Regan's Kit



finished product


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 08:44 am:

Gary thanks for posting your pictures....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary M. Wheeler on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 09:42 am:

You're welcome. I wondered maybe the original wood was not a single piece that was milled and drilled. Maybe the laminated parts were glued onto the core to create the "channels" that the spring clips fit into?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 10:48 am:

They used several different types of "wood" but the most common has a single solid core piece that typically was strips of 3/8 thick wood pieces of random width stuff glued together then a 1/16 thick veneer was applied to both front and back. The grooving and drilling operations came last from what I can tell. Pretty much the same technology as the wood dash except thinner. Some cores were dovetailed together under the veneers. Ford tried all sorts of concoctions to try and make it moisture proof. Paraffin wax soakings for varying lengths of time were tried. Then longer soakings and then shorter ones when I guess it was determined that longer didn't help much.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Wednesday, October 14, 2015 - 12:57 pm:

My First T engine ran bad for about 10 years, I did 4 valve jobs that were not required and changed the engine out for a rebuilt one. I still had the same performance and no one to ask in the 1980 era.

Then I realized there were two things that had never been changed, the coil box and the carb. Both were bad!

I painted the coil box wood with a nice thick coat of black paint to keep it dry on rainy days. It looked good, so it was not replaced. The black paint contained carbon to make it black and carbon conducts electricity. That fact allowed the coils to share sparks.

The engine ran fairly well on battery, but really wen crazy on magneto when I increased the engine RPM and shared more sparks.

Thank you, John Regan, for the plastic coil box wood that does not need painting!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 01:09 am:

You are most welcome James but one thing that is kinda funny is that Ford NEVER painted the coil box wood at all. You are correct - for sure not BLACK for the reason you stated.


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