Rear axle bearing question/opinion

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Rear axle bearing question/opinion
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Thursday, October 15, 2015 - 07:23 pm:

How bad is too bad for the roller bearing slope?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, October 16, 2015 - 08:36 am:

Slope?
I change the outer sleeves if they have a pronounced groove from the rollers and check the Hyatts so they have stiff cages. If the Hyatt rollers looks good and measure to a few 1/100 under 0.500", they can be used.
The axles must be checked at many areas except at where the bearings ride, but if the axle looks usable and you have new or good used Ford sleeves that have run in the inner position + good Hyatts, then there's usually no problems with sloppy bearings :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Friday, October 16, 2015 - 11:42 am:

Something that should be checked is axle runout. I put together a rear end a few years back with perfect axle shafts, so I thought. There was no wear on them at all. I put the rear axle together only to find one of the wheels wobbled. Turns out apparently the car had been hit, and it bent the axle on the end. It's straight now, but I had to pull the whole thing apart and start over.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Friday, October 16, 2015 - 07:17 pm:

He is asking about allowable taper of the bearing rollers. I say none, they should be the same diameter end to end for each roller.

(Message edited by redmodelt on October 16, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Friday, October 16, 2015 - 11:29 pm:

Ok, I guess I should have described better. The cage rings at each end of the roller. Take each end of the bearing in your hand and how much is exceptable twisting side to side. bearing


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 12:13 am:

Sorry but I misunderstood your question.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 02:46 am:

I'd say none.. The wear seems to starts to accelerate as soon as the cage is loose, maybe since they then can roll on an angle relative to the axle?
Often the rollers are bad when the cage is loose, but it's certainly possible to stiffen up the cage with some welding or riveting technique if the rollers still are good enough to use.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 02:53 am:

The pictured bearing is one of the repros with solid rollers that isn't recommended to use as a pinion bearing due to several sudden catastrophic breakdowns, neither in the outer position on the axles - maybe as an inner bearing since the bending strain on the axles are lower there and the lubrication is better?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 03:14 am:

The pictured bearing has eight rollers instead of the seven I've soon on some repops, but as long as usable Hyatts can be had at auctions and swap meets I'd stick with those.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Saturday, October 17, 2015 - 10:45 am:

People have been using solid roller Model A rear axle bearings for many years. Model A run at higher speeds so it comes down to keeping the bearing lubed. While there may still be lots of original type bearings out there but what we can put our hands on that are still good is a different story. You could have a pile of 15, after you subtract the ones that have very loose cages, are worn out or pitted could put the count down to a couple. I have been there and had to use the modern replacement type.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, October 18, 2015 - 07:50 am:

Tyrone... Are you saying the cage is loose? That can be fixed by center punching the protrusion of the bar where it extends through the end of the cage.

With regards to the rollers being a smaller diameter at one end, most folks will tell you to replace the bearing and I typically replace them too. However, I have in the past simply put the worn end of the bearing toward the inside with the better end against the hub. I haven't had any issues. Most folks get nervous if the rear axle bearings aren't perfect. But the truth of the matter is that even after they're worn out, those roller assemblies will keep on rolling for years as long as you replace the sleeves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Sunday, October 18, 2015 - 10:53 am:

Yes, thank you James. The cages are loose to the point that I can twist the two different ends a 1/4 inch plus in opposing directions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James J. Lyons III - West Virginia on Sunday, October 18, 2015 - 03:05 pm:

Just peen each one at 4 locations where each bar protrudes through as I said and that will fix them. I am away from home and won't return until tomorrow night but PM me if you'd like me to send you a picture when I get home.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Niels Andersen on Monday, October 19, 2015 - 04:34 am:

As I understand it the full thickness of the bearing surfaces of the rear axle should be 1 1/10". - How much wear is too much before you scrap it these days?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Monday, October 19, 2015 - 07:54 am:

Axle OD at the bearings is 1.0625". That is 1 1/16".

When an axle gets worn undersize the real danger is that it will snap off from a stress riser at the line where the wear ends. I would not use any axles - or drive shafts - with a noticeable stress risers from bearing wear.

This thread contains a lot of good information about the solid roller bearings. I would never use one of those!!!!!! See here:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/29/47804.html


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