Add front end weight

Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration
Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Add front end weight
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Sandberg on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 02:16 pm:

Need to add several ,?, pounds to front end of 26 roadster to improve steering caused by increased eight added to rear end. What is best way to add without harming the looks of front end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Zachary Dillinger - Charlotte, MI on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 02:24 pm:

Can you pack some lead weights in the frame rails?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 03:10 pm:

How much weight did you add to the rear? The reason I ask is that my 16 touring with two passengers in the rear steers fine. Just wondering if there may be a more orthodox way to improve your steering.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 03:37 pm:

Get a heavy front passenger.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Derek Kiefer - Mantorville, MN on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 04:00 pm:

Unless the weight was added behind the rear axle cantilevering weight off the front, I can't think of any good reason why it would need more front weight to steer properly.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 04:03 pm:

Don, just funnin' about the passenger. Would the metal weight that are used as counterbalances for commercial Bar-B-Q pit lids work? They are over a foot long and kind of skinny and may fit inside the frame rail channel. Another alternative would be to buy the longest, largest diameter iron pipe that will fit in the frame channel and fill with concrete. When dry, slide in frame rail and secure with Zip ties.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 04:07 pm:

Don,

As others have said, just how & where & how much weight did you add to the rear? It really shouldn't affect steering unless you've done something extreme. Rear engine Model T dragster?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 04:07 pm:

Just a thought:
Perhaps the thing to do is add a leaf or two to the rear spring instead of adding even more weight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 04:53 pm:

Ready, fire, aim! I'm just thinking Don might want to fill us in on the problem first.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 05:12 pm:

I carry a 500 gallon vat of mayonnaise on the front valance.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 06:25 pm:

Burger, he's got a 26 roadster, so the answer is simple. Use 26 front bumper brackets to support a bumper. He can make the bumper as heavy as he wants or needs.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 06:40 pm:

Sounds good, but when he needs to make a ham sandwich out on the road and
doesn't have any mayo, he's gonna wish he'd taken my suggestion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Pharis on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 09:56 pm:

I hear RAJO overheads are pretty heavy:-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Terry Woods, Richmond, Texas on Thursday, October 22, 2015 - 10:41 pm:

Kevin, Any cast iron OHV heads are heavy.

Burger, I believe he cooks hot dogs in his manifold cooker.

He must have likes my bumper solution. He's advertising for some front bumper bar brackets in the classifieds.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, October 23, 2015 - 12:30 am:

Ever notice the front bumper on a '32 to'34 Packard? Ever hear or read the story behind it?
As I recall, designers came up with this stylish, beautiful car, with sweeping fenders, slightly aerodynamic body lines. The whole car was beautiful! The prototypes were built, and test driven, when a problem was found. At certain high speeds, the steering became unstable. Production had begun and a panic to find and quickly fix the problem followed. Turned out, the aerodynamic design coupled with the size and shape of the front fenders began lifting the front end above a given speed. They found that about eighty pounds of steel added to each end of the front bumper stabilized it just enough.
You can usually spot a '32 to '34 Packard by its front bumper.

Just a little useless thread-drift disguised as trivia.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Semprez-Templeton, CA on Friday, October 23, 2015 - 12:48 pm:

Packard wasn't the only auto manufacturer with aerodynamic/weight balance problems. The first generation Porsche 911's ('63-'68) had the same problem. At speed (over 100 MPH) the front end lifted to the point of instability. At first, Porsche added two heavy cast iron weights inside the front bumper. In 1969 they lost the weights, extended the wheelbase by a few centimeters, added a second battery in front and carefully redesigned the fender flairs. Evidently these changes brought things under control.

I'm still perplexed by Don's problem, one that may never be known.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Friday, October 23, 2015 - 01:24 pm:

John,

The VWs were supposed to have the same problem with speeds over 100 mph but it could not be proven because people could not find a hill that was long enough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Friday, October 23, 2015 - 04:27 pm:

I think everything in the front axle and steering should be carefully checked before adding any weight to improve handling.. All kinds of things happen to almost 90 year old cars - when mine started to feel looser in the steering after some use, I found the steering gear case had loosened up where it's riveted to the column. A piece of hack saw blade tightened it up and made quite a difference - and it holds up fine after some 500 more miles. Some checking should be done with a helper - one shooks the steering wheel and the other looks and feels if there's any play in the joints.
Ok, should have mentioned caster and toe in first - they're #1 to check for good handling.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerome Hoffman, Hays Kansas on Friday, October 23, 2015 - 05:15 pm:

100% sure caster is correct?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Friday, October 23, 2015 - 09:22 pm:

Liquid in the tires is what we did on the farm.
Maybe it would act like Dynabeads to also balance the tires!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Friday, October 23, 2015 - 09:55 pm:

I put sand bags on mine. It goes so fast, the front end lifts.


Posting is currently disabled in this topic. Contact your discussion moderator for more information.
Topics Last Day Last Week Tree View    Getting Started Formatting Troubleshooting Program Credits    New Messages Keyword Search Contact Moderators Edit Profile Administration