Low Gear Bushing Removal

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Low Gear Bushing Removal
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, October 24, 2015 - 09:49 pm:

Searched the forum, and came up with nothing. Anyone have any suggestions on removing the low gear bushing? Its pressed in even with an inner shoulder in the shaft and i see no way of trying to press it out. The only way i see getting it out is by somehow cutting it out which i am hesitant about doing.....Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Martin on Saturday, October 24, 2015 - 11:07 pm:

John, You need a driver that fits the ID of the shaft close, but does not pass thru the bushing. The ID of the shaft in this area is 1.685-1.689". This should be larger than the ID of the bushing. Of course the bushing gets pushed out away from the gear (out towards the rear of the car).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank van Ekeren (Australia) on Saturday, October 24, 2015 - 11:10 pm:

Usually not that tight, you can knock the bush out with a drift, just make sure that it,s supported on the rivets surface and not the outer part of the drum when smacking it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Saturday, October 24, 2015 - 11:30 pm:

Thanks David and Frank,..There is very little difference between the OD of the bushing, and the OD of the sleeve it mates with, so trying to get a grab on it has been an exercise in futility...but i will try your suggestions... thank you.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kohnke Rebabbitting, Clare, Iowa on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 01:36 am:

This is the easiest way. You can use a tap, or a taper tap, or lathe threads on to a cone, that is a size to fit the bushing to screw in, and then press the the cone out the correct direction.

Herm.





Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 01:55 am:

Thank you Herm, unfortunately i don't own or have access to some of the fine machinery tools i need to complete this process..i have a hydraulic press, but nothing that compares to your setup.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 02:15 am:

Why are you hesitant about cutting the bushing? That's the only way I could do it many times - and it's easier to do in the hardened transmission gears since the hack saw blade won't cut or damage beyond the bushing. After the cut it's easy to get the bushing out with a punch.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 02:23 am:

Roger, you are probably right. That seems like the only logical way i can get it out...i was just looking for some options..thanks for your input.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Dupree on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 08:22 am:

John,

Do you have a muffler cutoff tool, one of those pneumatic cutters? If so, use the muffler cutter to cut the bushing. Works quick, and usually pushes the bushing out as it cuts.

Ron Dupree


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 12:44 pm:

There was a "special" expansion tool made by Stevens Tools just made for the removal of that bushing - makes it quite easy.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 12:52 pm:

Thanks Ron, i do own one of those cutters, that sounds like a great idea...Will give it a go and see what happens.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 02:51 pm:

I pressed the old one out with the new one.

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rick Goelz-Knoxville,TN on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 02:53 pm:

I think it was this bushing !

Rick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 04:11 pm:

John, I use a burr in my die grinder to cut a groove through the bushing. Just be careful when you are nearly through, although a mark in the gear bore is of no consequence.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Tomaso - Longbranch,WA on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 12:25 pm:

No - you can't press the old out with the new one on a low drum - it has in internal step.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By R.V. Anderson on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 01:02 pm:

I use a tap that I picked up at a used machinery warehouse. I paid $3 for it. Works beautifully.



It's not rusty, just cruddy. I'll spiffy it up one of these days.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Noonan - Norton, MA. on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 08:06 pm:

Just an update on the bushing i was trying to remove, and thanks for all the great suggestions. I used an air chisel as suggested by Ron Dupree and it worked fantastic, i had it out in less than 10 seconds. The sharp edge of the chisel was just enough to grab the slight protrusion between the bearing and the inner shoulder, and the jackhammer effect pushed it right out...Thanks guys :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 08:27 pm:

For those without special tools, I have done the following for years. Grind a taper on the end of a punch. Grind one side only. Use a small hammer to drive the sharpened punch down between the bushing and the sleeve. Keep the rounded back of the punch in contact with the sleeve as you proceed to cut through the bushing. Start from the drum side and work down to the shoulder of the sleeve. Once its cut, its easy to punch out. An old machinist taught me that. At first I resisted, thinking it was way too "shade tree" for me. Once I tried it, though, I liked it and have been doing it for many years.


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