Starting after overhaul

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Starting after overhaul
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Sam Mendenhall on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 04:10 pm:

I just recently put together a 1914 with new engine. How is the best way to start it up, we are using coils and mag, no battery. Jack up the rear wheels or pull it down the road. It is to stiff at this point to fire, got good coils mag is new. Thanks for any suggestions.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Scott Owens on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 04:52 pm:

The last motor I did I left the plugs wires off and pulled it down the road a few miles. I had oil and water in it. The motor got nice and warm. It pulled started fine after that. Scott


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 04:55 pm:

It will most likely be stiff and I would not be comfortable with a new mag so I would disconnect the mag and attach a 12 volt battery.
Next I would use a modern with a long strap and the ignition off to tow it,and fire it up by switching to on and pressing the low pedal.
Jacking and cranking could make you wish you had eaten more Wheaties. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 05:17 pm:

Short of a tow the battery is a must especially if you're going to try to hand crank a tight motor. You'll never get enough juice because it's going too slow. I would pull the mag wire too.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philip Berg on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 05:18 pm:

I used a 24v adj volt power supply to start my freshly built engine. Took me about an hour of tinkering to get it to run.

I followed the recommendations for 1-1/4 on the mixture and slightly past TDC for timing. In the end it was 2 turns on the mixture screw and moving the timing slightly. Once I hit the sweet spot she would start up easily, even got a few free starts.

Next I tried starting on mag only and it took some tinkering also but she started on mag. I think my mag is not up to par even though I recharged the magnets. Will have to do some more investigating.

Just make sure your left arm is ready for the start. My engine was on an engine stand for it's first start.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 10:20 pm:

Tow it a mile or two in high gear
But if you doing by yourself set the rear up on stands in high gear on 12v bat and I suggest using starting fluid and be ready for a workout


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Menzies on Sunday, October 25, 2015 - 11:48 pm:

Over time I have assembled several engines and in each case each piston is inserted in each cylinder to assure a friction free fit, the piston should "fall through". Each ring is inserted in to the cylinder and pressed down to ensure no binding and to confirm the gap. It is imperative that all the carbon is removed from the ring lands when using old pistons. When each piston is installed and the connecting rods are attached the engine should be rotated to ensure no binding. When the assembly is complete the engine should rotate manually with no binding. With a good quality fit the engine compression may be somewhat higher, however it still should be able to be manually started with relative ease. I must admit many years ago I assembled a 6 cylinder Dodge engine and had to moderately tap the pistons in the cylinder and when assembled the starter wouldn't touch it. I had to tow it for several blocks sometimes with the rear wheels skidding I was very proud of the "tight" engine.
I was in high school at the time and told my shop teacher the story his first question was did you remove all the carbon from the ring lands, I said what carbon? I disassembled the engine removed all the carbon from the ring lands with a carbon removing tool and reassembled and the engine started on the starter and ran perfect. I was 16 or 17 at the time and this was my first engine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tyrone Thomas - Topeka KS on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 12:25 am:

I lube all moving parts especially the piston rings and bearing well. I have use STP. Leave out the spark plugs, turn over by hand about 20 times to get oil to throw. Jack up rear wheels. Put plugs back in and fire it up. Leave it run low idle (about 5-7 notches) for 20 minutes +/-. Listen for abnormal sounds and for over heating. Do the 20 minute thing a couple times, than go for a slow ride some 10 plus miles. Keep the speed low for the first 50 or so miles


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 07:47 am:

What did they do in the Ford factory? I seem to recall seeing footage of them driving off the assembly line. No towing necessary.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tom Miller, Mostly in Dearborn on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 08:05 am:

I believe they were started with a motorized drum similar to a wheel dynamometer. You can spot it in some of the movie footage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 08:26 am:

Tom

Correct, here are some photos, 1914 era.

First the engine got its bearings 'burned' in on these large electric motors, that freed up things considerably.



Then when assembled in the chassis, wired up to the magneto, oil, and gas in the tank, the operator checked performance, with starting and running on this setup.



Without those machines to help, have used the towing method, pulled around the block, touching low pedal some to turn the motor. Then when ready flip the switch and get 'er started!


Chain on my back ready to lace to the hack and tow to go. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 11:49 pm:

I think the motors were run in my large electric motors long befor they were installed


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 03:46 pm:

I did the tow method on a friends T, with hood off and towing real slow. Just step on the low speed pedal and watch the fan blade, if it starts your first reaction is the right one, let up on the pedal the tow vehicle will be no problem.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 06:02 pm:

I'm told that when running them in with the electric motor, they were run until the load on the motor dropped to a certain point, indicating the bearings, rings, etc. had mated well enough for operation. Sometimes referred to as "burning in the bearings." At that relatively slow RPM, the Babbitt could "work around" without wiping it out--mostly reducing the high spots in the bearings.
I will probably be corrected by following postings!
:-)


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