The Ford script is everywhere!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: The Ford script is everywhere!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Weisgerber on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 11:12 pm:

I know that especially on the "Black" era T's the Ford script can be found on so many parts, it's unreal. Nice to find though. I've read that in the later years of production it was done to identify genuine ford parts, as there were by this time many makers of inferior "non-Ford" aftermarket parts.

So far I've found the script on at least 15 parts, and or, items such as the steering wheel spider, horn, brake lever...... and this is just the beginning I'm sure. There has to be at least 100 places on the average car if not more. It always brings a smile to my face when an additional script is found. It's not that I'm easily amused, I just love the car and the hobby.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed Baudoux Grayling Michigan on Monday, October 26, 2015 - 11:36 pm:

The most memorable part of our project, was standing at the wire wheel cleaning parts. Watching brand new parts come out from under the dust and grime. So many scripts!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 12:02 am:






Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 08:02 am:

In some respects March 19, 1919 is a dividing line between two production eras of the Model T. Prior to that date the name Ford in script appeared in relatively few places on the car. Primarily on the cylinder block, the cylinder head, hubcaps, radiator and ignition switch (beginning in late 1913/early 1914. Then about 1915 the name Ford in block letters began to appear on other parts, including transmission tail shaft plates and inside crank ratchets.

On March 19, 1919 the management at Ford Motor Company decided that henceforth the name Ford in script would be placed on virtually anything. One reason for the change from block letters to script was because the name Ford in script is copyright-able, and has trademark protection under the law, while the name Ford in simple block letters is not.

About 250 different Ford parts were designated as having the Ford Script either stamped or embossed on them. In the drawings collection at the Benson Ford Research Center, individual parts drawings will indicate where the Ford script should be placed on the part.

I often think of March 19,1919 as if it was line in geological strata. If the part does not have Ford in script on it, it was made before that date (sort of like lower strata in rock formations). If it has the name Ford in script on it, the part was made after March 19, 1919 ( sort of like upper stratus in rock formation. When I see the name Ford in script on the front axle or front cross member on a brass era car, I know those parts have been changed, and were made after the car was built.

Respectfully Submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Kossor - Kenilworth, NJ on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 08:36 am:

Trent, very interesting history lesson in the evolution of the Model T. Thank you for sharing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 12:35 pm:

Hi Trent, That's good to know. Thank you for bringing it to our attention.

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 04:49 pm:

Thank you again Trent B!
W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 04:52 pm:

Must be a March 19, 1919 or later nut :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George_Cherry Hill NJ on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 04:59 pm:

The GPW Jeep of WW2 is also an exercise in 'scripting '. Heaven forbid an MB (willy's made) Jeep part be assumed to be a Ford!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Bracknell United Kingdom on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 06:12 pm:

I've seen GPW parts that just have a script F.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 06:55 pm:

I think Keith was hinting at the question of: if you are judging a pre 1919 vehicle and an otherwise correct part has a Ford script on it, does it deduct points on the judging?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 06:58 pm:

I wonder if anybody has a die that was used to stamp or emboss those small Ford script's on some of the parts. I have been to a lot of old car meets over the last 45+ years but I cant recall ever seeing a Ford script die.

I wonder how they did it. Interesting!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 07:01 pm:

All over the place!
1
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 10:05 pm:

Noel, You're right. I've always thought that all front axles had either the DB on early ones or Ford script on the later ones. The front axle either had one or the other, but were never without a name on them..

Based on what Trent posted above, front axles would have DB on them into the '14 model year only and Ford script only after March 19, 1919 and no name on them for those years in between. Is that correct, Trent?

Thanks, Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 10:42 pm:

Not exactly, Keith.

The Dodge Brothers were not the only suppliers of front axle forgings to Ford. There were several others, including Transue Williams (either a "T" superimposed over a "W" or a large "W"), Cleveland Hardware (a "C" superimposed over a "H" where the two vertical legs are curved). In later years Herbrand also supplied the forgings (a "H" surrounded by a horizontal diamond), many of which have dates embossed into the forgings as well. Ford also made some of its own axle forgings (the letter "F" surrounded by a triangle).

DB front axles seem to occur most frequently between 1912 and the summer of 1914.

The part drawing for the front axle, T-202, indicates where Ford wanted the manufacturer's trademark placed.

One more point about front axles: 80% of the ones one Model Ts today are either bent or twisted. The only way to know is by placing the axle on a jig that checks that the 2 spindle bolt holes and the 2 spring perch holes are all parallel and in the same plane. Model T front axles may be difficult to break, but they are surprising easy to bend or twist. Bent or twisted front axles will not track correctly and may produce rapid tire wear.

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Trent Boggess on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 11:02 pm:

Oh, and another thing; Most if not all model T front axles have the factory symbol number on them, T-202. Technically T-202 is the factory symbol number for the axles that used 1-piece spindles. The factory symbol number for axles using 2-piece spindles is T-202B, but I have not seen a 2-piece spindle axle with T-202B on it. They all just have T-202 on them.

And... The T-100 1914 Model T's have the name Ford in script on them. That's the way the company wanted them. But these are easy to spot because the Ford in script appears on the passenger side between the spindle bolt and the spring perch, not on the driver's side like almost all production post March 19, 1919 axles do.

Some of the Cleveland Hardware front axles used in 1911 are strange drop forgings. They are normal looking from the spring perches out toward the yoke,, but the I beam section between the two spring perches is very light and skinny.

But I digress...

Respectfully submitted,

Trent Boggess


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Townsend ; ^ ) Gresham, Orygun on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 11:48 pm:

I picked up some original 1919-1922 runabout side curtains from the Fred Lau Sale. They are in pretty good shape, and at first glance were pretty ordinary...



But upon closer inspection, just to the side of the long vertical "light" sideways, is a Script F.



Then on the folded over part where it attaches to the side curtain clips on the windshield, it appears again:



There are no Ford Tags on them, but at this point, I am reasonably certain they are original Ford parts...

: ^ )

Keith


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Keith Gumbinger, Kenosha, WI on Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 02:31 pm:

Trent, Thanks for clarifying that. I really didn't think there were no symbols between '14 and March 19, 1919, that's why I raised the question.

Keith


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