Rear end rebuild shopping list

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Rear end rebuild shopping list
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 07:50 am:

Hi everyone. I have decided to take my rear axle apart and check the thrust washers. Well, I didn't decide this as much as my research has pointed me in that direction. I have a whining in the transmission, or at least that's where it sounds like it's coming from. A lot of people suggest it's actually in the rear end, and I have never had it apart to check the thrust washers anyway, so I now have a project.

My big question is what all I will need. I plan on buying a gasket kit, bronze thrust washers, and a jug of 600W oil from my usual parts supplier. Is there anything else I should consider ordering or inspecting?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Goodheart, Edwards, NY on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 08:03 am:

When I took mine apart I replaced the 10 bolts that fasten the ring gear to the differential case, mostly because all were loose and two were broken, also replaced the 3 long bolts that bolt the two differential halves together.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Paul Levans - Lafayette, Indiana on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 08:06 am:

Be sure to order a copy of Glen Chaffin's book on the rear axle. You will find it to be invaluable!

https://www.modeltford.com/item/RM7.aspx


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By William Goodheart, Edwards, NY on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 08:22 am:

Yes, by all means "get the book". I couldn't have done it without Glen's book.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 08:29 am:

I'd go ahead and order the modern pinion bearing kit. You'll almost certainly want new bearing races, as well. Do you have the tool to remove and install them? If not, that's another good investment. There are apt to be many things you will need when you get inside and inspect everything. I ended up with two new axles and a new drive shaft. Although the gears had a little wear, they were quiet and I re-used them. (They are still quiet).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 09:01 am:

I'm another who will always use the Fun Projects pinion bearing. But you'll need to wait until you have the spool out to send for a core.

Yes, definitely, on the book and the sleeve puller. Also neoprene oil seals. You'll find out what else you need when you get in there and start checking things. The book will tell you what to look for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 09:26 am:

You need a big drip pan and a bag of kitty litter. Take it apart, then you will need to clean and inspect all the parts.

Except for the Ford shop manual I would not buy anything else first. You may need everything, or (unlikely) just a gasket set.

I just took apart the rear axle for S/N 904. It had its original Babbitt washers in perfect condition. Other than a pair of bronze thrust washers and a gasket it needed nothing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 09:32 am:

It can certainly vary a lot how much can be reused when repairing the rear end from almost nothing except the outer halves and the driveshaft housing to almost everything, so it's best to split and clean it first before making your orders.
But I'd suggest you add the modern neoprene seals that is put on the inside of the outer axle bearings. They'll stop the oil inside from mixing with the grease in your outer Hyatts, so you can likely get by with felt seals on the outside.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Gould, Folsom, CA on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 11:38 am:

My typical RE rebuild means
1. New axles and diveshaft
2. New ring and pinion
3 Better Hyatt RE roller bearings
4. New sleeves (for sure the outers)
5. New DS sleeves inner and outer
6. New DS Hyatt bearing (still have NOS)
7. New bronze thrust washers
8. New washer(s) between the axle ends
9. Neoprene seals
10. New brass upper DS bushing
11. Better ujoint
12. New or better nuts and bolts as needed
Bottom line is I reuse the axle housings, usually the differential cage, usually the DS thrust ball bearing. That's about all.
Problem with original axles is there are so many potential areas where wear/bends can be excessive. Its just plain hard to find one that is good in all areas. I've had much better luck finding good used DSs.
All of my REs have been early using the enclosed DS spool. If I were to do a later style with the open spool I'd opt for the modern roller bearing set up as decent late spools are very difficult to find.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 02:40 pm:

If you don't know what kind of thrust washers are in your rear axle, that alone is enough reason to "have a project." Years ago I rebuilt the one in my '16, and, as I was broke at the time (a common malady around my house), selected the best out of a pile of Babbitt thrust washers. Although the rear axle has yet to be used, I will take it back apart and put in Bronze--there are way too many horror stories out there nowadays--and one just happened on the tour last weekend! My '25 barn-fresh is sidelined until I do that change (and add the AC brakes, and some other repairs it badly needs).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 02:43 pm:

If you don't know what kind of thrust washers are in your rear axle, that alone is enough reason to "have a project." Years ago I rebuilt the one in my '16, and, as I was broke at the time (a common malady around my house), selected the best out of a pile of Babbitt thrust washers. Although the rear axle has yet to be used, I will take it back apart and put in Bronze--there are way too many horror stories out there nowadays--and one just happened on the tour last weekend! My '25 barn-fresh is sidelined until I do that change (and add the AC brakes, and some other repairs it badly needs).


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 02:45 pm:

Sorry, dial-up hiccup apparently.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 04:25 pm:

Jared,

Don't get too anxious to spend money. Take it apart and see what you've got.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 04:54 pm:

I agree, you have to disassemble it all first. I had a '26-7 rear we rebuilt as a club project about 4 years back. I told the ones that helped I never wanted to open it up again. It was almost a $700 bill in new parts when I was done--and my parts were in decent shape mind you.

A few things I am glad I did were new axles, modern inner and outer seals, obviously thrust washers, and Fun Projects adjustable bearing.

Piece of mind is what I got in return after it was all said and done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 05:39 pm:

I'm just trying to get the ball rolling on an order. Won't have time to tear into it until this weekend, so right now I'm just getting some research done. I have the books, and I will reread them before turning the first bolt. I know I will need new gaskets and fresh oil no matter what, and the thrust washers are a given as they are most likely what I'm needing. If I get it torn apart and find I don't need them, I'll cross them off my list.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Noel D. Chicoine, MD, Pierre, SD on Tuesday, October 27, 2015 - 07:03 pm:

and whatever you do, when you get it apart and replace the thrust washers, put a metal tag under one of the outer bolts with the teardown date and the statement that the thrust washers were replaced so the next custodian of the vehicle won't wonder if it has ever been done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jared Buckert on Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 01:01 pm:

I jacked up the rear end and checked the end play at the wheels. The passenger side moved very little, if at all. Might have been more like the car rocking than the wheel moving. The driver side moved significantly more. If I had to guess, it was close to 1/4 of an inch. I also stuck my finger in the fill hole to get a sample of the oil. It was very thick. Thicker than axle grease. Is this normal? Or is my teardown a little overdue?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Wednesday, October 28, 2015 - 01:17 pm:

1/4" movement is bad news - well the whining was already. You may need a new ring gear and pinion plus plus - but let's see what's inside :-)


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