Building WWI Light Patrol Car. Any Model T Body Parts I Can Use?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Building WWI Light Patrol Car. Any Model T Body Parts I Can Use?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 09:42 am:

Here's a phot of what I want to end up with. What I'm starting with is an early chassis, early front fenders, radiator and cowl with wooden wheels. I may or may not use a metal early cowl or go with this plywood version.

Was this platform, bench seat and rear bed a total fabrication from the US Army and just put on a Model T chassis? Or are there some bits and pieces from other Model T or TT vehicles of the period? I didn't think the TT came about until later.

And, if this rear bed was a fabrication, would it have been all wood, or a metal sking over wood braces? An all wood construction would be much easier to create, but would almost look "buck board" to me.

I'll hang up and listen.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Bracknell United Kingdom on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 10:07 am:

start with this book
http://www.naval-military-press.com/light-car_patrols-1916-19-war-and-exploratio n-in-egypt-and-libya-with-the-model-t-ford.html

I would think you could find a US source for it. A very enjoyable read.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 10:52 am:

I think what you are trying to build is not anything used by the US Army, Every "Light patrol car" I have seen photos of, was a British or Commonwealth fabrication. I think for the most part, they were just stripped down Fords, made lighter to be able to travel over the desert of North Africa and Palestine. The same thing was done by the SAS in North Africa in WWII with the GPW and MB jeeps. They just removed anything that was not needed, such as the windshield, top and bows, pintle, bumpers and even cut out some of the grill slats.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Prideaux Margaret River West Oz on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 11:29 am:

This one is modeled on an WW1 Australian Army desert patrol unit


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 04:44 pm:

So, these Model T military patrol cars, wither US Army or commonwealth are just cut down "standard" Model T's? If that's the case, then what body style am I looking for to cut down? The example I'm trying to replicate sure looks like a custome made pickup type bed to me.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 06:41 pm:

Robert -- I'm about to build one as well. It seems that there were many variations in the bodies of vehicles which were used as "Light Patrol Cars", mostly based upon Model T chassis. You probably would be OK to use the cowl from an open Model T body with a wooden seat and rear "tray," or to build one like the model you've shown.

I assume you've searched the internet for info via Google. There are lots of pics of different ones there.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jem Bowkett, Bracknell United Kingdom on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 07:00 pm:

Reading the book, it seems these things were very ad hoc, probably a pickup bed knocked up on one, a gun platform on the next, a cargo/ammo box on another, I don't get the impression there was much in the way of formal design.

And don't forget to make it authentic with a broken crank arm with wire holding the engine up, and broken spokes splinted together with cut up fuel cans. Also laden with fuel and water cans, spare parts and a sun-compass. And the brass won't be polished 'cos the glint of brass would give away your position. You have to read the book to get the feel of how they operated.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gustaf in Idaho on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 07:04 pm:

The photos of the car Russell posted are of a well documented specific design. I think it was really originally designed as a utility vehicle rather than a patrol car but it was well suited for the job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:18 pm:

The first pic posted by Russell appears to show a dummy door on the right side of the body. I'm aware that Canadian RHD cars had doors on both sides. Did some made in Oz have dummy doors on the right side?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Hanson - Kingwood, Texas on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 10:30 pm:

I have a display 1917 Browning machine gun (non-functioning replica) for sale that looks like the one in the photo below. I also have the swivel mount.

I also have new 1915 fenders (right and left), hood and hood former, and a good brass radiator. I was going to build one of these scout cars last year, but other priorities have taken hold. I am open to reasonable cash offers or trades. PM me through the Forum if interested.



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 09:06 pm:

Open Express body as a starting point?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Saturday, October 31, 2015 - 09:45 pm:

Mike, I have never seen or heard of a Canadian RHD car with no driver's door. The vehicle Russel shows is most likely a re-creation, using whatever parts were available to the restorer. Perhaps the body side was part of the re-creation. It is certainly a nice vehicle.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Alan George Long on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 04:55 am:

Russell,
Is that Jack McRoberts Wife's car?
Alan in WA


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 08:02 am:

Jem B. -- Thank you for posting the info about "The Book." I have ordered one, and my Light Patrol Car education is about to begin in earnest. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Prideaux Margaret River West Oz on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 08:21 am:

Alan, yes it is. I purchased some books from her recently and she was good enough to show me the car. Lovely lady, very proud of the car. Sorry Jack passed before it was completed.
Russell


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Brough on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 07:59 am:

Mike,
I'll take you up on the M1917 and the 1915 parts. I've got some rear fenders that will work and can come up with some running boards. My rollling chassis, your front end parts and a open light express body and the machine gun, and I should be well on my way with this project.

I'll be in Moultrie, GA on Nov. 20th to see if I can fill in some missing pieces. My 26/27 cowl and gas tank will not make the project, so I guess I'll need an oval tank and some way to get fuel to the Kinston L4 carb that is on the Nov. 25 engine.

With a bench seat on the express body, I'm presuming the tank was under the seat somewhere.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 08:38 am:

If there ends up being an extra pair of '15 rear fenders in the mix, I could use those for another project.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ed in California on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 10:13 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Frank Harris from Long Beach, CA on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 12:08 pm:

The first model shown displays a woven wicker basket on the back. Those are available very reasonably at China Town in any city or some discount home stores.

Below is a picture of such a basket on our 1912 Buick Roadster.

buick


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 05:51 pm:

Mike Hanson - Kingwood, Texas your profile does not come up. I tried to email you. Please contact me reference 15 fenders and hood.
jputnam(at)wcoil.com


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chris Olsen 40 miles west of chicago on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 06:04 pm:

So, an up armoured speedster? I like it!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 08:41 pm:

Jack P. -- He sold the front fenders and hood to Robert Brough.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Boris Forgerit on Tuesday, November 17, 2015 - 01:19 pm:

Hi Robert and everybody ! I'm building a similar model (1916)and hope to finish it for 100th WW1 armistice (11 nov 2018). You could show my project at :http://fordtmachinegun.blogspot.fr/

at this time, only 2 pages,in French, sorry !


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