Help dating this pic. Model N, S or R, and Early T are included.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Help dating this pic. Model N, S or R, and Early T are included.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 11:16 am:

This photo, courtesy of the Dickinson County Historical Society, Abilene KS, is mislabeled "1907." The T in front appears to be a waterpump car (upright crank). An Abilene Ford dealer did receive a T touring in December of 1908. Could this be that car?


Closeup of the Ford T and R or S to the upper right:


First T in Abilene, December 19, 1908:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 11:18 am:

It is a pre - S/N 3000 Model T, possibly a two lever. It would cost much more than $850 with the optional top, windshield, horn, lamps and speedometer shown.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 11:19 am:

And another Ford (NR or S) behind the first two Fords. There is at least one other NRS to the upper left, third row in the full picture.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 11:27 am:

A little editing shows the black striping on the fenders. The hood former also looks brass, aluminum, or another color. I've thought the first Model T, such as the one Henry Ford took on his hunting trip in Sep 1908, look like they have a brass/aluminum hood former, and this may suggest the same:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Watson -Florence,Colorado on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 02:29 pm:

Great Photo!

Thanks Rob




-Don


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Jorgensen on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 02:45 pm:

Is that a child's pedal car in the far lower left of the photo? If so, it is a very early pedal car.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 02:50 pm:

Don, my pleasure.
Wayne, yes, I believe it says "Rambler" on the front.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 03:08 pm:

FWIW, the car to the right of the T is a 1906 or '07 Buick model F.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 04:11 pm:

I would love to know what these 5 cars are. There must have been a very successful dealer for them in that town.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 04:12 pm:

Is that a Troy windshield? Can anyone identify the carbide generator on the Model T?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 04:45 pm:

Jerry,
My guess is Rambler. Abilene had an active Rambler dealer at the time, and as of Feb 1909 four 4 cyl. Ramblers are listed to Dickinson County owners:



Rambler on "OldMotor" site:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 04:53 pm:

I think you're exactly right Rob. The enlargement really helps. Thanks.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 07:35 pm:

i dont know much about ramblers but there a lot things that are not the same on the two cars. maybe just different years??? charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 07:56 pm:

Charley, I am beginning to think the same thing. The front springs on the Rambler are semi-elliptical and the photo cars are full elliptical. Also, it looks as if the tie rod is in front of the axle in the photo cars and to the rear of the axle on the Rambler.

When I get home I'll post an article that names all the makes of cars in Dickinson County (Abilene) in early 1909.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 07:59 pm:

I wonder what is on the banner that the two guys in the upper LH corner are holding?

banner


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:02 pm:

Sometimes even with all the push back, how fast we went from using horses to cars amazes me. Centuries of horse and cart to automobiles in a matter of 20 or so years. Sometimes you look at the faces and ages of the people driving these early cars and "who would have thought" comes to mind. Thanks for posting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Matheny on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:07 pm:

Thanks for the neat pictures, sometimes think I was born to late.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:17 pm:

Well, there's at least on "Perfectly Simple; Simply Perfect" car in the bunch. The car in the second row, furthest to the left side of the photo, appears to be an '08 Maxwell LC Tourabout. I've become intimately familiar with those. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Woolf on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:18 pm:

Rob,

I don't think the car you have identified as a Rambler is a Rambler. The radiators are different (the Rambler has vertical bars, the other has horizontal bars), the Rambler does not have a crank in front while the other car does, the front cross members are different and the tierod on the Rambler is behind the axle and in front of the axle on the other to name a few things. Great picture!

Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:20 pm:

The car second from the right in the back row may be a Maxwell too. The resolution is too poor to tell.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Les Gitts - Ferndale, WA on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:20 pm:

I see a couple Maxwells and Buicks. In the second row, (couple from left) looks like a later Buick F. 2nd row- far right looks like a Buick 17. First row, right of the ramber looks like a Buick 10. Curious what the oval radiator car is, as I don't think it's a National, as I believe Nationals had completely circular radiators, not oval.

Thanks for the great photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:34 pm:

2nd row far right looks like Jackson script to me. Pretty fuzzy but fun to guess.

Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Woolf on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:39 pm:

Les,

I think early Lambert automobiles had an oval radiator. You are correct that the early National automobiles had a round radiator.

Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 08:55 pm:

How about a 1908 Maryland?

http://www.shorpy.com/node/15027


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Woolf on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 09:26 pm:

Richard,

The Maryland auto is very close in appearance to the car in the picture. However, I think they are two different makes. The bottom of the radiators are different, there is a rod between the two frame horns on the Maryland, the front axles are different, the Maryland has the tierod in front of the axle and the cowls are not the same. I still think it is a Lambert, but can't find a picture.

Thanks,
Dan


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 10:06 pm:

This list was published in the Abilene Daily Reflector on February 27, 1909. Considering the Model T is an early T, I would think the cars should be included on this countywide list:



Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Rob Heyen - Eastern Nebraska on Thursday, October 29, 2015 - 10:24 pm:

I count five NRS, plus the Model T. A couple of cars enhanced:



Jackson on the right?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Eric Hylen- Central Minnesota on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 07:47 am:

The Maxwells made a good showing. There's two in the bottom photo with the Jackson and one behind the car with the oval radiator. That's a total of four, so far.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gilbert V. I. Fitzhugh on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 10:17 am:

I believe that the cars thought to be Ramblers, really are Ramblers, despite some differences in their appearance. Rambler made 2-cylinder as well as 4-cylinder models, and the 2-cylinders were cranked from the side.


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