Winter is almost here!

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Winter is almost here!
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 01:01 am:

I would like to thank everyone on this Forum for being here when I needed help. I read the Forum many times a day. I wish I would have paid more attention to my Dad when I was growing up about the Model T. He never restored any like you guys do. He had his on shop and worked on model a and t fords. I got interested in Tees about 5 years befor he passed on. Now I`ve had to depend on you guys for a lot of help. I think we get sideways from the forum and what it`s here for.It`s nice to let off alittle steam among friends. Spring will be here be for we know it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 01:27 am:

For reasons beyond my understanding, 1950's American cars are hugely popular in
Sweden. They have a special interest in big fin Mopars, so I am exposed to this directly,
as I am a long time Forward Look owner.

Anyway, I got a visit from a group traveling the States, looking for cars and parts and
as I had a captive audience right there, I asked them "Why ?" I mean, why not Saabs
and Volvos ?

The response was that Saabs and Volvos were boring, and big American cars are un-
deniably awesome. But what really hit me between the eyes was the followup .... they
said that with 13 months of winter every year, what better way could a guy spend his
time than locked up in a nice shop, welding and painting his big finned beast, and when
spring comes, the car is ready to go cruising !

Well, cruising and car shows aren't my bag, but the idea of a nice shop to lock oneself
away in for the cold months was an epiphanal moment for me. Do your heavy work while
the car is laid up for the winter months and be ready to hit the trail when the good weather
returns. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 01:54 am:

I drove up through Sweden in the fifties.
They had a lot of American cars. Norway too.
I even saw five guys in a model A in Denmark during the evening commute traffic.
I think they built De Soto trucks and cars in Belgium and shipped some north with other Chrysler names on them. I know Plymouths sold well in England but they were called Chryslers.
In the fifties the SAAB was a two cycle three cylinder little car and the Volvo was not very big. I saw a few SAABs with a window sticker calling them a TROLHATTEN MOPED. Trolhatten was where the SAAB was built, they also said, "Buy a SAAB and that's what you will do". I saw so many Chevrolets and Fords from the late thirties and Ramblers and Nashes from all years. The new '57 Chevrolet seamed to be poular with them. I guess I was there in '58.
They drove on the left side of the road in those days.
They also had Pobaeta (sp) a cheap Russian car as well as Citroens and VW. Oh, and rear engine Mercedes sedans, the 130 and 170 from before the war. Sweden was a neutral country during the war..


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By rick howerton on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 07:10 am:

My shop is 24x24 just the right size for heat and cooling. I have satellite TV, radio. I love it out there during the winter. I`m finishing up on a 27 touring. It was ment to be a ratrod with squire tubing frame with wheelbarrow tub cute in half for the fire wall. I changed it all out and back to the regional state that is in now. My 26 sedan that I built from the frame up it seats in the front garage ready to go. I`ve been known to take a nap or two out there. I have been gather parts for a early speedster. I call the T shop. I like keeping my friends wondering whats going on out there. I like to see them put back on the road.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 09:25 am:

For me, the winter hobby work season starts the day after Thanksgiving, and runs till the Chickasha swap meet in March. I work all the rest of the year on family projects and honey-dos. I have told everyone for years that after Thanksgiving, they had better be on fire or in a med flight helicopter, if they ask Dad for help. :-), I have all my wood stacked and ready to heat the shop, and have a new wood stove built and ready to go. I always look forward to the time in the shop. The worse the weather is outside, the better I enjoy the time in the shop. I get 90 percent of my Model T work done in the winter. Here in the Ozark Mountains of Arkansas winter is close ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 10:25 am:

How much snow do you get in the Ozarks ?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Donnie Brown North Central Arkansas on Friday, October 30, 2015 - 07:27 pm:

Burger, We can get a foot or more in a single snow storm. We usually have about 4 snow "events" having anywhere from 1 inch to the foot. Although I remember a few snows of as much as two foot. But usually 4 to 6 inches is the norm. The real problem is "ice storms" (freezing rain" Several years ago we had a freezing rain storm that had 3/4 inches of ice on the trees and power lines. 1/4 inches is where the problems start. Tree limbs start breaking and power lines start to brake. 1/2 inch of ice will break off tree trunks and power poles. That one bad storm with 3/4 inch of ice, broke off over 22,000 power poles in north Arkansas (that is not a typo) 22,000 poles is a lot of poles. There were tracts of land where every single tree trunk broke off about head high. We lost 1/2 of our old growth hickory, oak, and ash trees on our 38 acres. We were out of power for 18 days. The other problem with ice, is even 1/8 inch of ice, will "shut our world down" you can not even walk on it, let alone drive on it. But that does not stop the "good ole boys" from trying. :-). We keep enough supplies for at least a month on our own. (always have since I was a kid) May not need it, but we are always ready. We had a ice storm last year that was not as bad, but the man who builds all the repro gas tanks for Langs, Macs, ect was not able to get to his shop for over two weeks. That is one of the main reasons for the lack of gas tanks for awhile. So Arkansas weather even affects the Model T hobby. Donnie Brown ....


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