Fuel line question.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Fuel line question.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Weisgerber on Saturday, October 31, 2015 - 11:07 pm:

I will be changing out the copper fuel line that was installed on my 25 Tudor by a previous owner. Other then copper being susceptible to cracking at the compression fittings the line itself has so many curves and bends, never mind the small dents and kinks, it has to go.

I'm fortunate to have both of the original fuel line clamps still in place although they are not being used at the moment...who knows why, now for the question. I'm thinking of using stainless tubing so would I have to use stainless compression fittings as well....correct? I'd think I would, but I just want to verify it for sure. I will also try to follow the original path of the line while keeping it a safe distance from the exhaust pipe.

All thoughts and comments are welcome.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Saturday, October 31, 2015 - 11:18 pm:

I use steel brake line tubing. Comes in a variety of lengths and is easy to work with, forms easily and is inexpensive. Most auto part stores stock it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Saturday, October 31, 2015 - 11:32 pm:

I agree with Jack on the steel brake tubing. The " OD size fits Ford Part #2910 on the sediment bulb perfectly.


I route mine under the exhaust pipe to keep it out of the heat.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 05:08 am:

I do not believe the fittings onto which the packnuts on the fuel line screw are machined to accept compression acorns, and thus a good seal will be difficult to achieve. Rather, they are as cast, and the seal needs to be capable of bridging flaws. String will do the trick, but I use modern fuel hose.

I cut a short piece of rubber fuel line, about 3/6" short, and then cut the outside layer off. The inside layer is a neat fit on the fuel line, and the packnut will fit over it. This will compress with the packnut, and will stand repeated re-fitting over time.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robert Skingley ......Westland, Michigan on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 08:01 am:

For posting a picture on a subject.......that is a great picture Steve..........


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 08:41 am:

Alan

Same here. Use of the neoprene fuel line hose is the best bet. The old felt method won't last as long, the compression fitting cannot be repositioned or reused and can cause trouble.

Ford originally used a cylinder of felt as the gasket on the fuel line in the bore of the nut. That material compresses OK but will degrade. Neoprene fuel hose is a modern replacement for that seal. Cut the hose 3/8" long (hose of 1/4"i.d. and 3/8" approx. o.d.)

With the shakes and vibrations of the T engine, any firm connection will take some fatigue somewhere, the engine shakes and vibrates at speed, twists in the frame and generally gyrates when running. :-)

So a 'flexible' seal is better at the fuel line and carb or sediment bulb IMO. Have taken off many compression fittings that have about cut through the brass or mostly copper lines. Brass or steel lines, neoprene gasket inside Ford type gas line nut is the way to go for worry free fitting.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan Treace, North FL on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 08:43 am:

Oops, I didn't to spell your name right, Allan.
Thanks!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 09:40 am:

I am currently reworking the fuel line on my 1915 Runabout and here is some helpful data I can add to Dan's information.
The original type elbow shown above is 1/8 NPT on the male end going into the carburetor. Ford used 1/2 X 18 thread for the other male end of the elbow to accommodate the tubing connection and obviously so too is the compression nut thread. Original compression nuts and elbows are commonly available from Model T parts suppliers.
I have one question before I do the final assembly; is there a gasoline resistant thread sealant that works well?
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mike Walker, NW AR on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 10:19 am:

Ron -- Aviation Fuel Lube. The major T parts vendors carry it, or get it from Aircraft Spruce Supply.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 10:29 am:

Ron I use a product called "seals all"
This is a tube of c,ear sealant that can be had auto or home stores to repair gas tanks works like rtv gasket sealant get hard when curved but don't worry it will not be hard if you need disassemble the union
I been using it on old fittings for over ten years and as a side note makes great repair to those brass floats or seal cork ones I also used it to seal a radiator tube but this radiator on a test stand


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Smith on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 10:53 am:

You shouldn't need any sealant anywhere. First of all the 1/8 NPT doesn't need it because it is a tapered thread, and the other end doesn't need it either if the packing is doing it's job.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 11:02 am:

I use cusil It is an easily bent brake line tubing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 11:20 am:

I use the 1/4" brass ferrules with the original fittings and nuts. Use the steel brake tubing. Never any leaks, works great, no sealant required.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 11:43 am:

I think ALL auto parts stores have brake tubing.
I have probably done 100 fuel line replacements using brake line.
As Jack says, "Easy to work with, it's inexpensive, etc."
Actually, you can use copper tubing if you just use a short piece of hose on each end, but I don't see why you'd want to when brake line is so cheap, unless you happen to have some spare copper tubing.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Weisgerber on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 01:28 pm:

Thanks everyone for taking the time to share all of this great information. I like the steel brake line and neoprene compression idea.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 04:47 pm:

Larry, I'm with you. No sealant needed with neoprene compressed seals. Sometimes it could be insurance when the carb elbow wants to be tightened a bit more, but doing so would end up with it mis-aligned with the fuel line.

Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 01:53 am:

The vendors sell a neoprene "sleeve" to replace the felt. It is very inexpensive. I have also used a couple of different sizes of "o" rings, stacked alternately, that has worked very well in a pinch. There is no reason to use felt, ferrules, string or anything else. No need for short sections of hose in the line. If it starts to leak, just snug it up a bit. No use in trying to make this a complicated fix. JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 09:06 am:

Just after I got the T my daughter stopped at Lang's in Winchendon.
After a brief conversation Don gave her a catalog and two neoprene sleeves saying he will most likely need these.
He was right! :-)


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