Old Photo - Home Made Rail Car

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Home Made Rail Car
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 12:53 pm:

Not sure it is even a Ford, but could not resist the crudeness of this beast !


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 01:09 pm:

Gee Burger I thought you meant this kind of rail car! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 01:49 pm:

Pretty much the same thing, right ? ;-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Henry Petrino in Modesto, CA on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 02:17 pm:

I'm trying to be objective, but I can't for the life of me figure out what purpose that thing was intended to serve. I doubt if it could pull much more than itself and there's no place for cargo, so beyond use as a self propelled rail passenger car that's hard to get in and out of, what the heck was it for?

Of course on the other hand, it's a very interesting thing. Clearly, someone went to a lot of effort to create it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 02:42 pm:

My old man built what would today be called a "helicopter" (he called it "the whirligig")
using little more than a desk chair, a prop and shaft, and an old Hudson engine. What
purpose did it serve ? He wanted to see the land around him from "above".

The rail car was likely to get "brass" in and out of the woods where the logging camps
were.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 04:59 pm:

Any pictures of your father's "whirligig", Burger? Sounds like fun - and very, very dangerous :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 05:23 pm:

Mom has those photo albums. I was too young to have a camera back then.

Dangerous ? Just an early "lightweight" aircraft.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 05:41 pm:

Interesting to see the chain sprocket on the front wheels. Do you suppose they took the car off and turned it around so it could go back down the track?

brassscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Plank - Three Way, TN on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 05:43 pm:

Looks like there might be a pivot in the center. Maybe the whole thing rotated on the frame to reverse direction.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Layden Butler on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 05:46 pm:

Hence the sprockets on all wheels.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 05:50 pm:

I think you guy's have nailed it!! What at first glance looked rather crude actually was well thought out!! Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 06:06 pm:

I can't make out a 4 spring chassis so it may have cross springs, besides, it looks like it has a fuel filler cap on the cowl. Even the door handles look model A.
It also has 5 lug bolts, like an A, and you can see right through under the rear of the rear fender to the jack that tightens the chains, i.e. no spring blocking the view.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 08:48 pm:

Guys, it's a '29 Model A Ford Briggs-bodied Deluxe Fordor. (I can tell it's a Deluxe because of the cowl lamp holes in the cowl.)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 09:19 pm:

It looks like my wifes 29 Briggs town sedan but i have cowl lamps.Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Putnam, Bluffton, Ohio on Sunday, November 01, 2015 - 10:42 pm:

I think you can see the dome light also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 01:24 am:

There's a lot of mass there.bet stopping it would be interesting...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 01:31 am:

Note the slightly off-balance design, favoring the nose of the car, that tensions
the chain when allowed to find it's natural balance.

I think they could have used heavier timbers, don't you ? Those look kinda flimsy ! :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By G.R.Cheshire on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 10:48 am:

Burger looking at the picture it looks like it had "sprockets" on both ends and there seems to be a pivot in the middle with some kind of jack at the back end to tension the chain so I guess when you hit the end of the line you un-did the chains spun the car around and hooked the chains back up to go the other way!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 04:05 pm:

Could this heavy-duty rail base car have been built to move steam donkeys out to lumber areas? My understanding is that they often used their own steam power to be moved. I have heard and read that they had special rail cars made to carry them as far as the rails were laid. It would have been simple to rig a drive sprocket to the car's rear hubs if the rail car was already set up for it.
Those people worked hard! The steam donkey was built on heavy wooden skids. I have seen numerous photos of the lumber camps and riggings. Linda's mother was born and grew up in one such camp called Falk's Mill.
From the convenient place on the rail-line (or dirt road), the donkey was unloaded, and then dragged up the hill by its own power using rigging anchored in the trees. Once the donkey was in position, and leveled, it was anchored into place, and rigging tied into the trees was used to drag logs back down to the rail line or road to be loaded and hauled to the mill.
For what it is worth.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 08:02 pm:

Donkey of that era in the (northwest at least) would probably weigh 30 to 40 tons if not more, way beyond the capacity of even a Model T


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 09:02 pm:

I think it is just the equivalent of a speeder to get the company brass, parcels,
mail, or whatever up and down the line quicker than riding the log trains. These
were not uncommon on all but the smallest of operations. This one just has a
monstrously cumbersome carriage built under it. Most car-based examples sat
down on their own hubs with flanged wheels.


Yes, I noticed the pivot rigging and tensioners.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 09:52 pm:

Ford didn't have a deluxe 4 door, it's just a 1929 Briggs Town Sedan. The only thing that really different then a regular 4 door sedan is the fold down middle seat divider on the back cushion back, rear arm rest, dome light in the rear over the seat and of course the cowl lights. Looks like the one I had less the carriage under it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 02:39 am:

I have a '29 Briggs Town Sedan Mark, and it has the "extras" that you listed, plus a strip of stainless trim around the front edge of the cowl, and it also has a "robe rail" (actually, more like a cloth covered rope) on the back of the front seat, and those hand straps or "loops" on both of the door pillars between front and rear doors.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James E Smitherman on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 06:48 am:

When they turn the car around on the trucks there is a jack to tighten the chain at either end.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 07:25 am:

Not to forget the roll down shades one of which is down!! When the law stoped us he said do you know you only have one tailight?? Bud in Wheeler,Mi.PS,Suger Beets are done no it's slip seating in corn! Bud.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 10:54 am:

Mark,

This one plied the rails down around Vernonia. Not too far from you. Perhaps it
survives somewhere ? Imagine taking THAT on tour ? :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Husa on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 12:11 pm:

I wonder how they "steered" it? :-) :-) :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Hal Davis-SE Georgia on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 12:22 pm:

I bet the sprockets were already on the wheels from some other application and that's what they had to work with. No sense taking it off the front just 'cause you didn't need it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Gregush Portland Oregon on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 10:45 pm:

Ya I knew I forgot a few things. :-) While it's the twin of the one I had right down to the missing cowl lights, mine came Iowa to Portland Or sometime in the 60's. Who knows it might.


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