American Pickers

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: American Pickers
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 07:48 am:

This may have already been discussed, but did anyone else see last weeks episode where Mike and Frank sold that 1911 Touring that they picked up last year? They apparently sold it in June to a Ford agency in Iowa call Dahl. The car had a 1915 engine and the rear axle was much later, but otherwise it looked pretty darn good. They only got 12K for it, which is what they paid for it. Can anyone confirm this? I thought I heard that they had sold it for a whole lot more than that. 12 thousand for a complete 1911 is pretty darn cheap if you ask me, even with the wrong motor and axle!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Fred Dimock, Newfields NH, USA on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 07:52 am:

I doubt that American Pickers real!
Most of the "Reality shows" are entertainment only and have little to do with real life.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Wrenn-Monroeville OH on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 07:55 am:

Best way to confirm it Bill I guess would be to call their business. I saw it also, I have no reason to doubt it's legitimacy. I understand they were in Ohio mid October. Would've liked to have met them. It did look like a nice car for the money, if I'd have known they still had it for sale, and could've got it for that price, I'd have snatched it up so fast it wouldn't be funny.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jim Dix on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 08:15 am:

There was a local sighting of Mike and Frank passing thru the local airport when they were "working" in New York.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Georgetown TX on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 08:20 am:

They often stumble badly when buying and selling old cars. It's more real than you think, and yes they get paid big bucks for allowing the film to take place, but no, the negotiations are not scripted.

The part that IS scripted is when they narrate about the story or history behind an item. All that takes place long after negotiations are done.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 08:52 am:

The places are scouted before hand for content. Don't know how that's done but their not driving around in that small van keeping 2 locations going. May have started out that way but no more. Losers have to be tossed in now & then for interest/"reality". They do seem to get beat up on cars a lot. I'd like to find a Model A at that price.

(Message edited by chaney7 on November 02, 2015)

(Message edited by chaney7 on November 02, 2015)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 08:54 am:

They had a shoot set up at a local collector. The entire process was a "set up".

While there was no exact script for the seller, the producers went through his collection picked some items then told my friend what they would pay for the items. Then they wanted to take those items and salt the pieces in various places in his barn.

When the 2 guys showed up they were given the script of what to say what to offer and where the items were stashed.

My friend was treated so shabbily and the prices were so below market he threw them off his property.

They don't drive around in the van, they show up in huge motor homes driven by staff. The only time they drive the van is quick shots pulling up to the "find" or driving down a local road.

Folks it's all Hollywood like all other reality TV. If you believe it the real deal, I'm still selling shares in the Brooklyn Bridge 1/2 price if you act quickly.

You do have to admire these 2 guys that have a middle of nowhere little collectables shop and turned it into a huge money maker, the all American dream.

just sayin'

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 08:59 am:

By the way, I did try to contact Antique Archaeology as soon as I saw the episode last year when they bought the car. I called several times and sent numerous emails, but didn't hear back until a month later, when they politely told me the car was sold. This was probably November of last year, but according to last weeks episode (which supposedly took place in June of this year) they just sold it to the Dahl family in Iowa. I guess what happened is as soon as Mike and Frank bought the car they contacted this Dahl family and sold it to them, but didn't show the scripted selling until they could film it for us, which happened in June.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By brass car guy on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 09:15 am:

My above post was told to me by the person that had the experience, I was not there and, it was not me personally. I should have made that clear in my original post.

brasscarguy


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 09:35 am:

To make a show like American Pickers I would think you would have to contact the owners before hand in some kind of way. In this day and time of litigation and possible lawsuits for just about anything a national TV show has to be careful.
Besides going up to someones house or property unannounced might get you in bad trouble in some parts of the country.

There has to be type of script before hand.

It doesn't bother me one way or another.
I enjoy the show and I'm not complaining about it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 09:56 am:

I enjoy the show too. You get to see and learn about things you might never get to see at all. It's what I really like about Pawn Stars. You get a bit of history on some pretty odd items. Although it doesn't look it they've gone WAY beyond the original pawn shop story. I understand the shop is a tourist attraction and the guys don't actually work the counters any more.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 10:11 am:

I like the idea of the show. I HATE the format of constantly flashing back to one of the
two running his gob about the item, the other guy, the neighbor's cat, the weather ... just
shut the #@! up and show what's in the barn !!!!

It's no different than the gold mining shows, the cooking countdowns, the Raving B!tches
of Corndog County .... apparently this is what has been determined as "what America WANTS
to see". Stupid people, talking about their "feelings".

Once again I feel like a foreigner in my own land.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John F. Regan on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 11:11 am:

I can't help but think back when I was involved with TV repair and knew about the early headaches that the engineers had in trying to make color TV a reality for the world. Those guys worked long and hard to perfect a scheme to broadcast and receive color TV but also they had to have a scheme which would not make all Black and White TVs in existence obsolete so the scheme had to be such that a Black and White TV got a normal B/W version of the program while those with color sets received it in color. What a fantastic invention that allowed programs and video right in the home of great events everywhere on the planet. What a fantastic medium of communication. It used to be used to spread only truth and journalists saw that as a sacred duty. What a fantastic heartache those engineers probably would feel if they saw their tons of hours of effort reduced to a crowd of duds yelling "Jerry Jerry Jerry in a studio where 2 females are wrestling on stage and screaming profanities at each other. For the simple minded the simple programs are the easiest and cheapest to produce. I don't blame Jerry Springer because these shows cannot exist unless people are willing to waste valuable time of their lives watching. I see more value in the picker show than Jerry Springer but "reality" shows in general are super cheap to produce and it is no surprise that the dialog is staged since the purpose of the producers is to get you to watch it - not to teach you anything.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 11:22 am:

Always liked the show and enjoy as much, the banter that ensues here every time it's mentioned :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 11:55 am:

Pickers I like - Pawn Stars is stomach turning! I used to watch it but those greasy, fat folk and their inane banter was too much!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gene Carrothers Huntington Beach on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 12:13 pm:

I did the same as Bill and contacted the shop about the car soon after it first aired. I was told the same but a bit quicker than Bill that the car was already sold.

Since being an Iowa Farm boy I always like to see the shows but only for its entertainment value. Sometimes it gets pretty "corny"

I was recently contacted by a show scout for Check It Out by Dr Brulet along with some other forum guys here about appearing on a comedy show. They were looking for guys with some Model T knowledge. I ended up getting the spot but there was not much Model T info allowed since it was a strictly an adult sort of comedy show making fun of old car and the guys that like them.

I just got my check so it was all worth the time.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Myers on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 12:29 pm:

I was involved (behind the scenes) of a show they filmed in Wisconsin. Mike and Frank did drive their van up from Iowa however... they also had several vans of TV crew. The filming took two long days and it was 99% scripted, they looked at everything first and even buried a few items to find during the show.
Long story short don't believe everything you see on TV. I still like the show and try and watch it when I can.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Howard D. Dennis Byron, Georgia on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 02:47 pm:

Several years ago an episode showed Frank buying a Samurai sword for $100 and saying he'd sell it for $250. I called the Iowa store for 3 days and no answer. I then tried the new Nashville store and was told Frank had NO connection with the store it was all Mike's. After explaining what I wanted and much begging I was put in touch with Frank. I was quoted $650 for the sword. After sending the money I was promptly chewed out for wasting his time by requesting the money be signed for, lets just say my dealings with Frank do NOT leave me calling him "The Bearded Charmer" as they call him on the show!

Howard Dennis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Manuel, Lafayette, La. on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 03:01 pm:

I was contacted by a show about using my place in an episode about a year ago. I agreed over the phone then promptly received a packet of liability release forms and forms giving them unlimited use of all filming and so on. With that in mind you can at least be sure they aren't just dropping in on people.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 03:16 pm:

Did you get info on when the show you were in will air, Gene?
(If it's fun, I hope it'll be available online :-) )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 05:13 pm:

I got stuck in a medical lab waiting room about a week ago, with a TV playing some sort of unreality Alaska type show. I wanted to puke. SO scripted. People that stupid would not live in the Alaskan wilderness. People that stupid would DIE in the Alaskan wilderness.
I have met and known people that have lived there, and I have a great deal of respect for them.

It does not surprise me that John Regan was connected to early television. My respect for John R's knowledge of electricity and electronics is very high indeed. My father was a color television and cable television pioneer (not well known by well known standards). I grew up on the edges of those early days.

John R, Are you familiar with the legend of the "blue bananas"?

Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 05:43 pm:

The guys are responsible for killing the gas pump collector hobby because of stupid price inflation and guys with too much money tossing out what these guys say things are worth. Plus now every farmer that has a pump thinks it's gold.


Travis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 10:57 pm:

Yea same with Ford Mustangs and Barret Jackson. My neighbor,a handicapped Vietnam vet, has a couple mustangs. He saw 1 sell for big money on Barret Jackson and he thinks his is worth the same.
His are 6 cylinder,the low end 1's.Decent cars but not worth Barret Jackson prices.

I know someone who was on Pickers a few years ago. You may remember the guy with the 1939 Airstream camper.I don't remember the exact price Mike quoted him but the picker guy shut quick.
Mike did it for the publicity for his place but it really didn't do much good.
They bought a few things but ,again,nothing spectacular.
I know I may have even said it here once before,if that bunch of crappy hooks comes pulling in here, they are going to be shown the way out.
Once that show came out it made it hard for folks like me to get anything old for it's authentic value or fair price taking condition in consideration.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 11:35 pm:

Scripted or not it's ok TV
And I will bet there more legwork then what you think


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 12:49 am:

My wife and I went on a road trip early this summer up through southwestern IA. We stopped at a convenience store in Bedford IA. and there was a poster on the bulletin board that said they were going to be in the area and if anyone had anything interesting to give them a call. So far, haven't seen anything about that. We did see the episode when they stopped in Murdo S.D. and bought the cycle car. We saw that car (very interesting place) and visited with the owner. Very nice gentleman. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dan B on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 08:05 am:

I was just in their Nashville shop a couple days ago. It was full of stuff that I recognized from watching the show and other items that had historical significance. It was also full of people ranging from the very young to the old.

If anything is gained from the show, it's that a new generation has been exposed to the importance of preserving things from the past, even if the motivation is money. How many collections do you think have met their end in a dumpster or scrap yard after the next of kin were oblivious to its significance?

It is amazing to me that the same people who are drawn to this forum because of their interest in preserving Model T's fail to see this. Every few months another post shows up complaining that these two guys are ripping people off, right after claiming that it's all staged! Try to figure that one out!

Maybe we can all be grateful that something close to our hobby is even on prime time television and that we get to see other people's collections from across the country instead of finding fault.




Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 10:25 am:

Let's set the record straight on this "American Pickers" episode that aired last Wednesday night. I live in Davenport and was asked by my friend K.V. Dahl to look this 1911 Model T over when it arrived last winter after the original airing of the "American Pickers" episode when the car was found by the guys and purchased. It was subsequently sold to K.V., as you saw on last week's episode. K.V. Dahl and his father Vinjy own a local Ford dealership, whose family has been Ford dealers since 1911, hence the desire last year to add a 1911 to their Old Car Home Museum stable. (Wow! What a place, by the way!) I work on K.V.'s Model A's and T's, including getting an original 1914 touring back on the road again after being in the family's possession since the late 1940's or early 1950's, at which time the T's owner traded it in on a new Ford. (!) The top and upholstery are still original!
Anyway, I have looked over the 1911 Model T seen on "American Pickers", as well as it being examined in detail by a TRUE brass car local expert, Craig Beek. His museum in this area consists solely of award-winning brass Model T's and his expertise in this area is second to none. As a true brass car expert, Craig spotted a lot of things wrong that I missed. While the car is basically good, it was an amateur restoration that used numerous incorrect parts, a couple of which were mentioned in this recent broadcast. Yes, the engine is a true 1915 and the rear end is a later version. Those are the two biggest dings against this being a high dollar car. But legitimate 1915 engines aren't exactly commonly encountered these days and has a great deal of value in itself! Some of the brass parts are not correct, but I believe Craig was able to help K.V. replace some of them with the right ones.
I also watched the show the other night (I missed the original episode when the car was bought). I don't think I am telling any tales out of school here by saying what you saw was pretty darned close to the truth all the way around, as I know it, including the price and condition. There had to be some element of "drama" added to keep the viewers glued to their boob tubes, but everything K.V. and his father said during the show was 100% accurate and truthful. This show in the final analysis is all about entertainment, NOT reality. Anybody who thinks this show is "reality" needs a caretaker and to be kept away from the voting booth. We all have long ago identified this animal and know what to expect when we watch "American Pickers".
K.V. has since acquired a 100% correct original 1911 Model T and will be putting the "American Pickers" Model T up for sale in the spring next year. He has asked me to get it running properly and fix a few little things before he offers it for sale so that the new owner gets a better car than he got. K.V. is as honest as you can get and whoever buys this car from him will not only be paying a fair price for it, he will also be getting a safer, more authentic and better running car than what you saw on "American Pickers".
If you Model T guys ever get to the Quad Cities area (Iowa-Illinois border on the Mississippi River), arrange ahead of time to see the Dahl family's Old Car Home and Craig Beek's brass Model T museum. They are not open to the public on a regular hour basis, so appointments need to be pre-arranged. Both K.V. and Craig are very amenable to receiving visitors and will make you feel welcome. While the Old Car Home does has a few "antique" cars, their main thrust is 1950's-1970's muscle cars. But K.V. has been coming around in the last couple years and has been adding Model A's and T's to the museum. He has seen the light! And you will not find a better brass Model T museum anywhere than Craig's!
Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 11:20 am:

Marshall, thank you so much for clearing things up for me, since I'm the one who started this whole thread! I really like that car, and it's good to know what's wrong with it and the true story behind it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marty Bufalini - Grosse Pointe, MI on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 06:20 pm:

I work in the entertainment industry. I used to watch Pickers but don't anymore. Of course, it's scripted and planned well in advance. It has to be to meet production and airing schedules. When I did watch pickers, I looked at all the stuff in the background that was ignored/passed over and could not believe they passed up on many, many collectible items in favor of rat traps and other meaningless items. I have to believe that the items I saw in the background were purchased off camera. If they weren't those two on the show are bigger fools than I thought. There is far more the this show than is aired.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By bob middleton on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 10:38 pm:

They are showing collecting is not museum relics
One man's treasure junk or hoards is another man's gold
Scripted or whatever we can agree this show just might help spark a younger generation to take a look back at the history beyond video games


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Craig Anderson, central Wisconsin on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 11:06 pm:

Of course some of it is scripted.
Nobody could afford to have the guys traipse all over the country with a production crew if there wasn't a guarantee of some purchases to help make the show.
A friend of mine was featured in an episode and he flat out said they all knew in advance of SOME purchases so some acting skills, all around, are helpful too....... :-O


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Gary Schreiber- Santa Isabel Ecuador on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 04:15 pm:

It isn't the pickers purchases that fund the show, it's the sponsors who pay millions in advertising air time. The stuff they find and sell is a drop in the bucket


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By George John Drobnock on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 05:11 pm:

It will be interesting to see how the Picker car is offered when sold - a 1911 or a 1915.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By James A. Golden on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 12:30 pm:

Marshall, some photos would add a lot to this thread.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By charley shaver- liberal,mo. on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 12:58 pm:

they wanted to come to my place, i guess you know what i told them,$##%^^%$%^& no. charley


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marshall V. Daut on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 02:29 pm:

James Golden -
I don't have any photos of the "American Pickers" 1911 Model T yet. I need to fix a few things before photos become public.
If you are asking about Craig Beeks' brass Model T museum, here is the link to an earlier discussion and visit report to Craig's:
http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/257047/328389.html?1355799133.
I'll see if K.V. has any photos of his Old Car Home that I can post. Nothing much on the website page.
Marshall


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Darel J. Leipold on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 04:41 pm:

The pawn shop show is rigged to some extent. I only view it when on vacation and the motel has cable. Someone who does watch it reported that one time when someone brought in a item to sell, it had a price tag on it. Also the "cast" earns big $$$ for "acting on the show. Also the Storage Wars bidders earn big $$ and I have been told that they are not bidding with real $$, the producers cover all costs. Do you notice that it is always the same people bidding? The people in the back ground are there just to fill out the scene.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 05:07 pm:

All I know is that the pickers came to a friend of mine and spent better than four grand, sure it was partly rehearsed but the purchases were real. He was happy and they were too. Has to be enhanced a little to make good tv. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Michael Garrison - Rice Minnesota on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 10:19 pm:

I like the show. I like Mike, he seems like a pretty good guy. The tattooed lady is a skanky old roller derby queen but she's got a good personality. Mikes brother Robby is an okay fella. Their expert "Dave" is a legend in his own mind and doesn't know what he's talking about and Frank wouldn't be allowed at my place.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Tim Williams, Hillsboro Oregon on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 02:36 am:

Did anyone see the one where they got the Rajo Head with both the intake and exhaust manifold and carb for just a hair over 2000 bucks? I just happened to see it the other day. if the head is not cracked or minor crack, I say they practically stole it. looks like it had all the valves and rocker arms also. I could not tell what model of Rajo it was though.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Bill Elliott on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 05:49 am:

Marshall, could you please send me a pm?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, November 07, 2015 - 04:32 am:

I know these so called "reality shows", aren't, but I enjoy some of them a lot. Much better than most of the "regular" (as my wife calls them) TV programs. Thankfully, we have a satellite system that has a lot of old shows and movies to add to the mix. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Harold Schwendeman - Sumner,WA on Saturday, November 07, 2015 - 11:12 am:

David - Well stated,....it boils down to just exactly what you said,.....that "these so called reality shows, aren't".

If it were actually "reality", the show would go something like this:

"Hey Mike,.....look at this old (whatever) I just found stashed here under this other stuff".

"I know dummy,.....I'm the one who stashed it there yesterday when we staged all this stuff for the show, remember?"

However, I'm like you David,....I still like to watch those type of shows just to see some of the old really neat stuff that actually really "IS" laying around someplace,.......harold


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