Front wheel bearing races

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Front wheel bearing races
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Seelman on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 08:44 am:

Hey Guys,

Over hauling the front end on my '15 touring. found the bearing races can move within the hub. I'd rather not get new hubs at $250+ per hub. Do they make thickened races? I also know loctite makes a cylindrical locking compound (loctite 609) for just such situations, up to .006" of slop. I have about .003". Has anyone ever used this? It's supposed to be good for up to 3000psi

Thanks

John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Wolf on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 09:03 am:

Years ago, I used to use a center punch and hit a few places around the hub and then use Loctite.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 09:06 am:

Yes, I've used loctite and other brands for cylindrical locking with good results. When the play was larger than recommended I've used steel shim stock to fill up the play and glued it on both sides - if the hole where the bearing should fit was nice, round and concentric, that is.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charlie B actually in Toms River N.J. on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 10:07 am:

I've tried the shiming routine and it's tough to do as the material needed in my case was very thin. 0.02 was all I could get in there. Ended up with jb weld. probably should have tried a new race.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 10:10 am:

Loctite 609 is ideal for this situation. It's exactly what it's made for.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 10:22 am:

I like to do the glueing on a clean hub without grease, put everything together so the bearings straightens up and the glue hardens in the correct position - then, a couple of days later, I can take it apart and fill with grease.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 10:33 am:

Please don't use JB Weld. I've seen the result of doing that; a huge mess. JBW can't stand the pressure exerted by the bearing on the hub and will crumble.

Loctite 609 would probably be o.k.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Seelman on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 10:43 am:

A mechanic here said Permatex 6400 is equivalent to the Loctite product, and I can find it here


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Randy Myers on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 01:52 pm:

I had this same issue but not on a model T. What I did was have the outer diameter of the race industrial hard chromed. This adds about .003 - .005 to the outside diameter. If you need more than that you can dip it a second time. It cost me about $20.00 per race but I felt is was worth it as it's a permanent fix.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 04:38 pm:

Randy,

The potential problem with that, can be that the worn area in the hub is only where the bearing race rides. The bore will not be worn where the seal sits. So, the larger race might not pass the unworn area of the bore.

John,

Are both bearings, (inner & outer), loose? Or, just the inners, (big ones)?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By John Seelman on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 04:47 pm:

Jerry,

Just the inners on both wheels

John


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 04:58 pm:

John,

For hubs with the relatively small amount of wear you've got, I've done the following. Rest the outer diameter, adjacent to the bearing area, on a hard firm surface. With a moderate sized ball peen hammer, (or better yet, a machinist's hammer, with somewhat of a chisel head), hit the outside diameter of the hub, over the area where the bearing would be riding, (try not to hit over the area where the seal rides). Don't hit too hard. Just a moderate strike. Then turn the hub just a bit and hit it again. Repeat this until you gone around the hub a few times and try the bearing again.

The idea is to close up the bore and reestablish a press fit.

Again, the idea is not to hit it hard, just to hit it many times. If you get carried away, you'll get the hole out of round and/or too small. It works faster & easier than you might imagine.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Monday, November 02, 2015 - 05:01 pm:

A machinists' hammer, as I mentioned above...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 02:56 am:

Loctite Stud and Bearing mount(at least that is what it used to be called) is amazing stuff. We used to use it in a past life (in the '90's) to hold an unbelievable load on a briquette making machine. It was the only thing that would hold the mold wheels, which were made from a hard chrome alloy, to the hubs. They had to withstand tremendous pressure as they were pressed against each other. That made a believer out of me. JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 02:57 am:

I used it on my TT front wheels and worked great. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Philippe BROST, France on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 03:34 am:

Loctite is great and the bearing will be very tight but you have to think how you will be able to get it out in the future. It has to be heated up to 480 F if you cannot use a press.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Tuesday, November 03, 2015 - 04:25 am:

Philippe, an oxy-acetylene torch will do that in a heart beat. Most car guys have one, or at least access to one. If it needs to come out, most likely the race is toast any way. JMHO. Daved


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