Old Photo - Model T Era Blacksmith/Machine Repair Shop

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Old Photo - Model T Era Blacksmith/Machine Repair Shop
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jay - In Northern California on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 10:47 am:


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kevin Holland, Utah on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 11:29 am:

Cold in the winter and hot in the summer.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Herb Iffrig on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 11:54 am:

I like it.
Looking around that room I have most of what you see.
I always wanted to set it up in a period setting. This could be my model!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By P. Jamison- PA on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 12:04 pm:

What's the machine on the left? A mechanical hammer?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 12:12 pm:

You call what you have a bandsaw??? Now HERE's a bandsaw!!! Wow, must be 16" throat on that puppy. I once had some "wheels" that size that I thought I'd build such a saw, but I don't have enough space for one!
Love the overhead lineshaft. Back then we didn't worry so much about heated shops, etc. Right now I'm on the net because it's only 37 outside & my shop has no heat, nor insulation & it's too cold to glue stuff out there! Hmm, gotta finish this project too, may have to do it in the house, but where??? (and keep my marriage!)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Larry Bohlen, Severn MD on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 12:12 pm:

Love the Edison bulb hanging in the foreground.
Neat photo.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dennis Seth - Ohio on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 12:15 pm:

Very nice picture.

Herb,
The only thing I could restage in that picture would be the five old grumpy guys!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Richard Eagle Ida Fls on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 12:48 pm:

Jay has been posting Zillions of these wonderful photos since before I was on the Forum. These "Shop" photos really take us to some wonderful places in time. I'm glad to see them each time. He posted this one before but many missed it and I'm sure the newer members are enjoying it. This is what was said a few years ago:

http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/331880/380016.html?1376179724

The expressions on their faces while being interrupted from work for a photo is as priceless as all the wonderful items in the place.

Again, Thanks Jay.
You made my day.
Rich


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 01:02 pm:

David, here's a saw I recently saved from the scrapper, 1920 Fay and Eagan 36".


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 01:44 pm:

Keith,
Dang'd!!! THAT's a BANDSAW!! Wow, did you get the table with it? Hmm, nothing OSHA about that one!!
Interesting the difference between the drive wheel and the slave wheel.
Looks like it barely fits in your shop/storage area!
I'm guessing you're going to put it to good use?
Uh oh, drool shorting out my keyboard. . .
Well, it's 43 outside, almost time to go work!
:-)
David


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 01:52 pm:

Yes, got the table but have to make a new trunnion to mount it. It was damaged in moving and part of the upper wheel was broken along with several spokes. I have welded the spokes back in place, also looking for a single phase motor for it. The bearings have all been reworked at some time and replaced with modern bearings instead of Babbitt. I figured it was worth the 50 bucks to keep the scrapper from getting it. Was a pretty good job to move though as it probably weigh about 800 lbs. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Carl Sorenson-Montrose,CO on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 02:52 pm:

A friend of mine's family owned a Blacksmith's Shop that started back in the late 1800s...Allen & Son Iron Works,San Bernardino CA....Since I was a kid I had heard stories about the place and the projects they did ..I could only make up in my mind what the shop would have looked like ...Not that this is their shop ,but I'll bet this is what it looked like...They built wagons,shoed horses,built gates,had a wheel shop,and later automobile frame welding...
When it was cold outside, some of the workers wanted to gather around the large stove burning the scraps from the wood working department...My friend still has the 100+ year old sign that hung in there that stated,," Absolutely No Loafing in This Area",,,,,Managment.... He told me when his all his Grandfather did was walk through the Area,,,and point at the Sign.....With that the sound of the Blacksmith's shop got back to normal...
Thanks Jay,,from another great Old Time look at the Past....
Carl


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 02:59 pm:

Keith -- that should have been like picking up a feather for that 6,000 lb'ish Towmotor you have parked in front of it....


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 04:05 pm:

P. Jamison. Yes, otherwise known as a trip hammer. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 06:20 pm:

Walter I agree but there is a reason the Towmotor is in front. So many projects, so little time! KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Sullivan on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 06:59 pm:

K.G.Barrier these days it's probably cheaper to buy a variable frequency drive, changes your juice to three phase costs around a hundred bucks, If you have 220 volts. Find em on ebay. Dave in Bellingham, Wa


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 07:07 pm:

David, I will look into that, thanks for the info. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 07:57 pm:

Keith -- I figured as much! Just went through mine last summer and hope I never have to do a forklift brake job ever again. It sure is nice to have when things like 800 lb. bandsaws come along, though. The bad part is that once the deterrent of an inoperable forklift is gone, you get bold and start dragging home all kinds of things that were best left untouched.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Burger in Spokane on Wednesday, November 04, 2015 - 11:31 pm:

Mr. Higgins,

THAT, Sir, was profound ! I often marvel at my friends with minimal-to-zero "handy"
skills and am pleased that I can do this work (whatever it is) myself. However, the
thought occasionally sneaks in that my perpetual level of "busy" is largely of my own
making .... tools, skills, or just fool enough to think I can do it ! :-)

Some times the idea of just loafing sounds pretty good ! ... and then I remember
that I have 40 projects that I need to get finished !!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Dexter Doucet on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 12:34 am:

P Jamison, that is indeed a power hammer and a fine one at that. Step on the hoop thingy and it goes to smashing. I wish could have one ...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 02:04 am:

Kieth, Ah, yes, I can see the repairs now--looks like you did an admiral job.
I thought that was trip hammer on the other side, and now I notice the forge right next to it for heating the metal. What a neat shop!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robbie Price on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 06:03 am:

Keith,
We have one of those saws where I work. We use it as a band knife instead of a saw in order to cut cloth patterns for suits.
My company has been in business since 1880 so I am not sure but they could have bought it new.

Robbie


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Garnet on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 08:40 am:

I feel fortunate that in my prairie hometown we still had a blacksmith in the mid 60's. I remember standing beside him inside his little building (nothing more than a shack) and watching him use the trip hammer. I'd watch his foot and listen to how the sound changed as he let up on the hoop or pressed harder on it. He (Pete Heibert) was a very old fellow and probably didn't live far into the 1970's. What I could have learned from him if I wasn't just a snotty kid - especially now that I'm getting deeper and deeper into the great hobby of aluminum casting - making my own crucible tools etc.etc. What a hoot this is - even the wife likes watching aluminum melt!

Garnet


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 10:24 am:


You could spend several hours watching videos David Richards has made of his 1925 steam-powered machine shop. One of my favorite details is the ticktock of the wall clock.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2zI0iozg3Ns


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Walter Higgins on Thursday, November 05, 2015 - 10:30 am:

Burger, I guess the positive way to look at it is I've never had enough self-control to not drag home something I wanted.... at least the forklift keeps one from potentially getting into a worse situation they might have found themselves in otherwise.


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