Crank sleeve removal

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Crank sleeve removal
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin C. Miller on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 06:48 am:

I have reviewed several past threads on the removal of the crank sleeve bearing. The one in my 1914 is so melted into the nose that the only way I know to get it out is drill it out. Is this a big No No? The sleeve removal tools etc, will not even budge it. Any suggestions?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 07:09 am:

Marvin, the original sleeves were split. If you use a pad saw to make a cut opposite the split, it should enable you to take the sleeve out in two pieces. I replace the steel sleeve with a bronze bush. These often have to be machined down a little on the outside diameter to fit the nose of the pan.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin C. Miller on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 07:38 am:

I used the hack saw and turned the blade upside down. Inserted it through the sleeve then reconnected the blade to the hacksaw. That did help, but the sleeve is so "melted" into the nose it is impossible to get out. Is a reamer a better option over a drill bit? Thanks Allan for the suggestion.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By john kuehn on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 09:45 am:

Marvin you may have to remove the sleeve in pieces.

Use the hacksaw blade in different places around the sleeve to cut through the sleeve.
Then use a small chisel to carefully peel the sleeve pieces out.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 09:58 am:

More hacksaw. Cut in two places. The bushing extends back into the pan so you can reach it with a drift and bash it with a hammer to collapse it and pull it out.


Because of the way this sleeve was installed from the rear and "peeled", a puller wouldn't pull it. The black paint here shows how much of the sleeve extends back into the pan where you can reach it with a drift to collapse it.


If you happen to have a mechanical hacksaw it makes the job less of an ordeal.


I was lucky, and didn't need to go all the way through with the second cut. As stuck as your sleeve is, you may need to make two complete cuts and remove the small piece.


A little grease and the all-thread squeezer made installing a new bushing easy.


Squeezing in the bushing compressed it a little so the crank didn't want to go in. Running a reamer through it made for a nice fit. It's a very pleasant improvement, not having a floppy crank handle.


I bought some extras in case I need to do this job again. I added the chamfer on one end to ease installation.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin C. Miller on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 10:18 am:

Thanks everyone! I do have an all thread bolt, which I used to remove the sleeve, didn't work, but to put the new one in is what will use. I think you guys are right, use the hack saw and be patient and keep chipping away at it. You guys are the greatest!!!


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Wayne Sheldon, Grass Valley, CA on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 04:04 pm:

Steve Jelf is the greatest! Excellent posts with so many tips and points to make the tough tasks easier.

One thing I would like to elaborate upon, your original question.
A drill (or end mill, reamer, etc) can be used. However, IT MUST BE DONE WITH GREAT CARE that way. The problem is that the crank handle and bushing both wear heavily on one side, and crooked. That moves the center of the hole over (up?) to one side. Any use of a drill (etc) will try very hard to follow the current center of the hole. The drill will try VERY HARD to cut into the material you want to remain untouched.
I have done it both ways. I thought carefully making multiple cuts with a hack saw was easier. Believe it or not.
Drive carefully, and enjoy, W2


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Chad Marchees _____Tax Capital, NY on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 04:42 pm:

Steve, What size bronze bushings did you end up using? Great post.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin C. Miller on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 08:24 pm:

Thanks Wayne you are so right about Steve Jelf! Great help.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Allan Bennett - Australia on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 08:24 pm:

Chad, the ones I use are 3/4" id, 1" od, and the standard length is 3". This is a bit long but easily rectified. They can be really tight in the crankcase hole. I often have to turn a little off the outside diameter to get a fit with less interference. If you just turn down the width of the crankcase hole, the bush can be drawn in from behind, and the rest of the od left as it comes.

Hope this helps.
Allan from down under.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 10:22 pm:

The bushings I bought are like Allan's, 1" OD, 3/4" ID, 3" long. I trimmed 3/8" off the end to match the length of the stock bushing. Generic bushings from a bearing store in Wichita.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Friday, November 06, 2015 - 11:32 pm:

I turned a driver out of an old rear axle shaft and I drive them inward to remove and outward to install Had one I had to heat some to get started,but otherwise it works fine.I just buy the replacement sleeves.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Saturday, November 07, 2015 - 03:51 am:

If the sleeve is rusted in tight, a bit of heat on the I.D. of the sleeve with an oxy-acetylene torch(use a small welding tip to keep the heat concentrated) will break down the rust. Heat the sleeve red hot(be careful to not get so much heat that you melt the solder on the crankcase dam, use a wet rag as a heat sink), preferably in sections, and let it cool between each application.The heat will break down the rust, and shrink the sleeve. If done correctly, the sleeve will most likely slide out with minimal persuasion. Using a hacksaw will help somewhat too. JMHO. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin C. Miller on Saturday, November 07, 2015 - 02:35 pm:

FINALLY got the old crank sleeve out!Old sleeve
Got the new sleeve in using Steve Jelf's method of an all thread bolt!New sleeve


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Marvin C. Miller on Sunday, November 08, 2015 - 09:19 am:

Final post


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