Installing Timken inner and outer races.

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: Installing Timken inner and outer races.
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Charles Weisgerber on Wednesday, November 11, 2015 - 11:56 pm:

I'm doing a total refurbishing of the front suspension on my 25 Tudor. I plan on replacing the inner and outer bearings and naturally the races as well. The bearings were over-tightened in the past and well....you could imagine. My question is this. Is there a good method to properly install both the inner and outer races to assure that are properly seated in place, and are in fact parallel to each other? Should I leave it up to a machine shop? I would be inclined to try it myself, but I noticed Lang's and other other suppliers do not offer a tool for this purpose.

Thanks in advance for your help.

Charles


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 12:19 am:

Ford had a special tool for the dealers to use, but I've had success using old races as a punch to knock on for seating new races.. I've ground the outside of the old races slightly so they don't get stuck in the hub.

Here's the proper tool,
gg
(lucky those who have all the right tools :-) )


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 12:29 am:

Be careful hammering on bearing races with a hammer. Hard steel races and steel hammers don't play well together. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Roger Karlsson, southern Sweden on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 03:08 am:

Indeed. I think I had a piece of hardwood over the races when hammering them in as far as possible, then in cases I didn't have a bad race as a distance so I could use the wood even further until they seated, I've used a brass drift on alternating sides.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Stroud on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 05:49 am:

I have used bearing races for different things in a past life, other than what they were designed for. Heating them red hot and letting them cool slowly(annealing)makes them much more "useable" for such things. Dave


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Ron Patterson-Nicholasville, Kentucky on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 07:51 am:

Anyone have one of those tools to loan?
Ron the Coilman


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jack Daron - Brownsburg IN on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 08:49 am:

I have one I had Tony Wilshire make for me.I need to use it on a 15 touring. I think he made an extra also.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 09:06 am:

That looks like it would be an easy tool to make.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Kenneth W DeLong on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 09:19 am:

for 50+ years i have used a brass drift? Bud in Wheeler,Mi.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mack Cole ---- Earth on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 09:23 am:

I grind down the outside of old races,use a little lithium grease on the inside of the hub and a brass hammer on the old race to wack it in.
I now wonder if using a press of some kind giving it a straight down push would be better.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Travis E. Towle on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 10:37 am:

I own a replica of that tool and was using it when an old timer jumped all over me saying I was going to destroy my bearings etc... Mine used the bearings to compress the cups - it worked,,,


Travis


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Steve Jelf, Parkerfield KS on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 11:04 am:

I've always used a brass drift too, but the tool applying pressure equally all around is probably better than whacking one side at a time. As for squeezing it in with the bearing, I'm with the old timer. Maybe it won't damage the bearing, but maybe it will. I'd rather put the force directly on the cup and leave the bearing out of it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Jerry VanOoteghem - SE Michigan on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 11:31 am:

What Steve said.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Mark Strange - Hillsboro, MO on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 11:53 am:

The cheap 12 ton Harbor Freight press that I bought 20 years ago has paid for itself many times over. :-)


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Royce in Dallas TX on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 11:58 am:

I use a race driver kit that came from Harbor Freight. They are also on eBay for very reasonable prices:

http://www.ebay.com/itm/ALUMINIUM-WHEEL-BEARING-RACE-SEAL-BUSH-DRIVER-SET-17PC-K IT-/201312710139?hash=item2edf2c2dfb:g:FDoAAOSwrklVDHfT

Race Driver.jpg


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Robb Wolff on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 01:34 pm:

A few years ago I pulled apart and old T axle that came from a wagon. One of spindles was badly worn and used a non-threaded Model A outer bearing. I kept the spindle and bearings and use them as a tool to draw new races into T hubs.

I clamp the spindle in the vice, tap the races lightly into the hub using a hardwood drift or brass hammer and assemble everything on the spindle using the old bearings. Then it is simply a matter of tightening the nut.

This is a productive use of worn out parts. I wouldn't recommend using new bearings in the jig and don't think the threaded T outer bearing would work that well for this procedure.

DSC_6782.jpg

DSC_6786.jpg

DSC_6788.jpg


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