How to attach 26/27 Door Glass to Winder Channel ?

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Model T Ford Forum: Forum 2015: How to attach 26/27 Door Glass to Winder Channel ?
Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Thursday, November 12, 2015 - 10:25 pm:

Can some body please tell me what is the correct way to keep my window glass attached to the lower winder channel.

I have all new parts in my door including new steel winder channel and correct rubber.
I pressed it in good, but still under load of winding it wants to pull off the glass.

My buddy tells me I need to add something to the rubber to make it swell and grip better.
Is that true and if so what do I add???


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 06:21 am:

Russell, I've used Loctite pl-s30 for the window channel. It cures to a soft rubber and can be cut with a razor blade if needed. Just my 2 cents...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 03:37 pm:

What did Ford use in the old days to make this rubber grip to the winder channel?


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 04:05 pm:

As far as I know they pressed it. But, I've always been worried about cracking the glass. So I just use a moderate amount to seal it.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 04:12 pm:

I wonder if spraying some WD40 or similar onto the rubber would be enough to get it to swell and become tighter on the glass for grip...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 07:49 pm:

Russell, I can't answer that. The original glass I've replaced had a gasket that was rubber and cloth combination. They have a firm grip on the glass like it was glued or had some kind of sticky tape. However they were so dried out and chemically broken down that I couldn't tell with confidence what it was originally. Sorry I can't be of better help to you. I took the easy route with the adhesive sealer. It would be a real pain in the posterior to have the channel come off after it was upholstered.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 08:25 pm:

Yeah, that is where I am up to finishing my door trim and wanted not to have to revisit fixing the door glass if I lose the channel later.
I called a guy in a hot rod shop in CO who said something similar to you regarding the composite rubber material.
Sadly, I have not received that kind of rubber in my purchase, it is kinder soft and slightly grippy but does not have any kind of gum or adhesive surface to it.
He said on later year cars that he works on he just uses that black urethane that comes in a tube and leaves it a day or two to set before using the winder.
I was hoping for something less messy and more in line with what Henry Ford was doing.
I used a smear of that urethane between my fixed window rubbers and my body to ensure no leaks.
I guess we are running out of old timers who know all these little tricks...


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By keith g barrier Savannah Tn. on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 08:45 pm:

I go to a local body shop(they always have an open tube of urethane) and get them to run a bead then put the glass in and let set over night. You can buy a tube of urethane rubber but it's expensive and the left over will have set by the time you need it again. KGB


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 10:40 pm:

Here's what to do.
Fill the channel with RTV in three places and set the glass in and roll the window all the way up.
Let it set a couple of days. It's that simple. I have done it maybe forty to sixty times in the last 30 years.

The old way was to set the glass up side down on a wooden plank and with the rubber strip on the glass you pound the channel onto the glass with a rubber hammer or pound on a foot long piece of 2 by 4 against the channel.
I have done it both ways.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Friday, November 13, 2015 - 10:43 pm:

Guys, thanks heaps.
I think I will go with the urethane and just hope I don't need to replace a window glass any time soon.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By David Dewey, N. California on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 01:10 am:

I was taught to oil the fabric/rubber material just before you install the channel to the glass. The oil makes the rubber swell & the glass is then (usually) nice & tight.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 01:33 am:

Wouldn't you know it, I posted this same question on another forum I belong to and below is the reply to my question.
This was something like what I was anticipating.
I thought I'd post it here as well in the hope of giving something back to this forum for others to read into the future should this question come up again.

"Use a product called "Glass Setting Tape", available in various thicknesses from automotive glass installers. It is available in various thicknesses to get the correct fit."

"Fold tape in half and insert glass into the Vee. Form tape snuggly to the glass. You need a tight fit into the channel. If loose get a thicker tape or add a additional layer. Your glass shop can help you with the thickness of tape if you take the glass and channel in with you. Lubricate the tape with engine oil and gently tap the channel over the tape and glass working you way back and forth until the glass is firmly seated, have the top of the window on a piece of carpet on a firm surface. Take a utility knife with a sharp blade and dull the tip with emery or a stone so it does not scratch the glass and trim the excess setting tape from around the channel. Clean the surplus oil up. The oil will continue to act on the rubber causing it to swell even tighter."

"Got this info from a retired glass man that cut my glass for me. Worked good for me."

Canuck.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Don Booth@ Bay City, Mi on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 06:05 am:

Aaron, that is exactly how I've done the widow channels. Loctite PL-S30 is a urethane and remains soft enough to cut with a razor blade in case the glass needs to be replaced. The original channels I've seen are very rusted up, some to the point of ruin. I feel its best to seal the channels good to prevent water from being trapped and causing damage.


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Russell Ritchie on Saturday, November 14, 2015 - 04:59 pm:

I got another reply outside this forum from a good friend at Bert's Model A Center in CO who offered this method which is similar to what somebody on here proposed.

"Take the glass out of the channel. Take the metal channel and squeeze it in a vise. Not a lot, just a little bit, Then turn the glass upside down and put your setting tape on the top of the glass and beat the channel onto the glass. IF you can pull it off ANY WAY by hand, then it is too loose and you need to squeeze the channel a bit more in the vise."


Top of pagePrevious messageNext messageBottom of page Link to this message  By Aaron Griffey, Hayward Ca. on Sunday, November 15, 2015 - 02:00 am:

Often the channel is too rusted out to be squeezed in a vice or any other way.
That's why you should use RTV or urethane.
I have taken several widows out after they had been set with RTV. Like Don Booth says above, you can always cut it out with a razor. That is a lot easier than taking the glass out after it was pounded in with real tight glass setting tape.
RTV NEVER dries hard. It always stays like rubber.
But it will stick to the channel and the glass VERY WELL.


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